Advertisement
HomeCollectionsRustic Furniture
IN THE NEWS

Rustic Furniture

FEATURED ARTICLES
EXPLORE
By Janene Holzberg | October 5, 2012
As a young girl visiting her grandmother's cabin on the Delaware River in the 1960s, Elizabeth Clarke-Shaw fashioned necklaces from acorns, crafted fairy gardens on old aluminum pie plates, and collected rocks in the time-honored tradition of adventurous children everywhere. “Nature really sang to me,” says the longtime Columbia resident. That persistent melody inspired Clarke-Shaw, now 57, to create one-of-a-kind furniture pieces that sprout branches in all their pristine glory as they pay homage to those halcyon days of innocence and imagination.
ARTICLES BY DATE
EXPLORE
By Janene Holzberg | October 5, 2012
As a young girl visiting her grandmother's cabin on the Delaware River in the 1960s, Elizabeth Clarke-Shaw fashioned necklaces from acorns, crafted fairy gardens on old aluminum pie plates, and collected rocks in the time-honored tradition of adventurous children everywhere. “Nature really sang to me,” says the longtime Columbia resident. That persistent melody inspired Clarke-Shaw, now 57, to create one-of-a-kind furniture pieces that sprout branches in all their pristine glory as they pay homage to those halcyon days of innocence and imagination.
Advertisement
FEATURES
By Marty Ross and Marty Ross,UNIVERSAL PRESS SYNDICATE | September 28, 1997
Blake Warner is an artist with an eye for twigs and branches. Warner makes rustic garden ornaments and furniture for a growing number of enthusiastic clients in the Seattle area. He's one of a great many artisans across the continent contributing to the strong revival of "nature's twisted treasures."Since at least the 17th century, people have been putting together tables, benches, gates and gazebos using branches and lots of imagination.It's not just an American craft. In the late 18th century, well-to-do Europeans began to replace the classical temples and sculptures in their gardens with rustic bridges and other structures made of materials found in woods and copses.
NEWS
By Maria Blackburn and Maria Blackburn,Sun Staff | March 11, 2001
When former President Bill Clinton and his senator wife wanted to buy a few knickknacks (OK, $3,000 worth of knickknacks) for their two new homes several months ago, they headed to historic downtown Frederick. When area antiques dealers and boutique owners are looking for that certain something to spice up their shops, many head to Frederick's dozens of antiques stores. Well-heeled Washington types have long made the 50-mile jaunt to Frederick to search for original treasures in a city center filled with small shops.
FEATURES
By Rose Bennett Gilbert and Rose Bennett Gilbert,Copley News Service | October 27, 1991
Q: Do I have to use curtains on the windows? We have a lovely view of the woods and a mountain beyond, and I'd rather throw an extra log on the fire (it does get breezy in the living room in dead winter) and keep the view open.Now even my brother-in-law has asked when I'm going to "finish decorating" -- by which he means hang curtains. What do you think?A: What with all of us getting back to nature in the '90s, undressed windows are very much in vogue -- and a great relief, to my eye at least, from the overwrought Victorianesque layers we began seeing in the '80s.
NEWS
By Traci A. Johnson and Traci A. Johnson,Staff Writer | November 19, 1992
No one would want to meet one of John Bottomley's creations on a dark night."I like gargoyles," he said. "They definitely grow on you."Mr. Bottomley, who has indulged in the art of making the hideous figures for the last three years, will show how he makes his grotesquely deformed human- and animal-like creations Friday through Sunday during the New Windsor Holiday Open House.He will be one of five craftsmen demonstrating skills at Customs Last Stand and Rustic Furniture, two Marston craft shops participating in the event.
NEWS
By Kathy Curtis and Kathy Curtis,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 26, 1998
WITH A BOX OF tree branches and a fanciful chair named Emily behind her, Elizabeth Shaw helped children try her tenon cutter last week at the Howard County Fair. Shaw, who represented Howard County Woodworkers Guild, was demonstrating how she makes her rustic furniture.The Hickory Ridge resident is a newcomer to woodworking. Her work with wood started with a dream.After studying art in college, Shaw worked in a hobby store at The Mall in Columbia.One night she dreamed about a wooden folding screen, decorated with copper panels and handmade paper.
NEWS
By Maria Blackburn and Maria Blackburn,Sun Staff | March 11, 2001
When former President Bill Clinton and his senator wife wanted to buy a few knickknacks (OK, $3,000 worth of knickknacks) for their two new homes several months ago, they headed to historic downtown Frederick. When area antiques dealers and boutique owners are looking for that certain something to spice up their shops, many head to Frederick's dozens of antiques stores. Well-heeled Washington types have long made the 50-mile jaunt to Frederick to search for original treasures in a city center filled with small shops.
FEATURES
By Yolanda Garfield | October 21, 1990
Trends ride in like waves, then disappear. During the '80s, Southwestern design was a fad that took the form of hokey coyotes in pastel colors, and baskets made in Taiwan. Today, Southwestern style is calmer, more honest. Colors are not merely pastel, but have traditional significance, such as the Santa Fe blue taken from Indian religious rituals. Just as primitive design and symbolism play against the light of the Southwest, the deep shadows and amber sunlight of late afternoon play against the brilliant hues of Southwestern artisans.
NEWS
By Al Winn and Al Winn,HARRISBURG PATRIOT NEWS | December 8, 2002
LEBANON, Pa. -- Pioneers in Daniel Boone's day built log cabins in the woods using little more than an ax. For modern-day Daniel Boones trying not to leave civilization too far behind when they trek into the woods, Conestoga Log Cabins Inc. has the answer. The 7-year-old company produces prefabricated log cabin kits in part of the former Bethlehem Steel plant in Lebanon. Conestoga, according to the owners, is moving successfully into a niche in recreational lodging somewhere between families getting rained on in tents and those making huge investments in recreational vehicles.
NEWS
By Kathy Curtis and Kathy Curtis,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 26, 1998
WITH A BOX OF tree branches and a fanciful chair named Emily behind her, Elizabeth Shaw helped children try her tenon cutter last week at the Howard County Fair. Shaw, who represented Howard County Woodworkers Guild, was demonstrating how she makes her rustic furniture.The Hickory Ridge resident is a newcomer to woodworking. Her work with wood started with a dream.After studying art in college, Shaw worked in a hobby store at The Mall in Columbia.One night she dreamed about a wooden folding screen, decorated with copper panels and handmade paper.
FEATURES
By Marty Ross and Marty Ross,UNIVERSAL PRESS SYNDICATE | September 28, 1997
Blake Warner is an artist with an eye for twigs and branches. Warner makes rustic garden ornaments and furniture for a growing number of enthusiastic clients in the Seattle area. He's one of a great many artisans across the continent contributing to the strong revival of "nature's twisted treasures."Since at least the 17th century, people have been putting together tables, benches, gates and gazebos using branches and lots of imagination.It's not just an American craft. In the late 18th century, well-to-do Europeans began to replace the classical temples and sculptures in their gardens with rustic bridges and other structures made of materials found in woods and copses.
NEWS
By Traci A. Johnson and Traci A. Johnson,Staff Writer | November 19, 1992
No one would want to meet one of John Bottomley's creations on a dark night."I like gargoyles," he said. "They definitely grow on you."Mr. Bottomley, who has indulged in the art of making the hideous figures for the last three years, will show how he makes his grotesquely deformed human- and animal-like creations Friday through Sunday during the New Windsor Holiday Open House.He will be one of five craftsmen demonstrating skills at Customs Last Stand and Rustic Furniture, two Marston craft shops participating in the event.
FEATURES
By Rose Bennett Gilbert and Rose Bennett Gilbert,Copley News Service | October 27, 1991
Q: Do I have to use curtains on the windows? We have a lovely view of the woods and a mountain beyond, and I'd rather throw an extra log on the fire (it does get breezy in the living room in dead winter) and keep the view open.Now even my brother-in-law has asked when I'm going to "finish decorating" -- by which he means hang curtains. What do you think?A: What with all of us getting back to nature in the '90s, undressed windows are very much in vogue -- and a great relief, to my eye at least, from the overwrought Victorianesque layers we began seeing in the '80s.
FEATURES
By Ralph Kovel and Terry Kovel and Ralph Kovel and Terry Kovel,KING FEATURES SYNDICATE | June 30, 1996
I have an old flag that measures 16 1/2 inches by 20 1/2 inches. It has red and white stripes and a blue square with stars. The stars circle one big star and go around the edge of the square. The names Hayes and Wheeler are embroidered on one of the stripes. Do you know about this?You own a rare political campaign flag for presidential candidate Rutherford B. Hayes and his running mate, William Wheeler. The pair ran successfully in 1876.My uncle has a bentwood-style chair made of branches and twigs.
NEWS
By Traci A. Johnson and Traci A. Johnson,Staff Writer Judy Reilly contributed to this article | November 19, 1992
Holiday shoppers looking for gifts this weekend could find some deals at New Windsor's Open House Friday through Sunday.Several stores in and around the town will participate in the three-day festival, providing snacks and entertainment for those looking for handcrafted and specialty items."
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.