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NEWS
By James Gerstenzang and Ronald Brownstein and James Gerstenzang and Ronald Brownstein,LOS ANGELES TIMES | October 27, 2006
WARREN, MICH. -- President Bush and his predecessor, Bill Clinton, campaigned for congressional candidates across the nation's Rust Belt yesterday, speaking on issues that could spell the difference in determining control of the House and the Senate in the midterm election. At fundraising receptions in Iowa and Michigan, Bush returned to "family values," denouncing a New Jersey Supreme Court ruling that same-sex couples are guaranteed the rights and benefits of marriage. Clinton, speaking at a rally for Democratic congressional and state legislative candidates in Syracuse, N.Y., responded to Bush's recent characterization of the Democrats as "the party of cut and run" in Iraq.
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NEWS
By Andrew Wainer | December 26, 2013
In the midst of the debate over the largest potential immigration reform legislation in 50 years, American communities struggling with decades of population loss and economic decline are being revitalized by newcomers. The economic contribution of immigrants in high-skilled fields is relatively well-known, but less acknowledged are the contributions that "blue collar" immigrants make in revitalizing depressed communities and economies, both as manual laborers and small business entrepreneurs.
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NEWS
By Jack W. Germond & Jules Witcover | March 13, 1996
YOUNGSTOWN, Ohio - Pat Buchanan, having failed with his imitation of a gun-toting cowpoke in Arizona and as a son of the Old South across Dixie, is now playing the redeemer of the Rust Belt, where he hopes his colorful harangue against foreign trade competition will lubricate his creaking presidential campaign.On the surface, there is no better place to take the message. This old steel town is a skeleton of its former self, with many large plants shut down, block after block of abandoned buildings and stores, and a downtown that often looks as if it is under an evacuation order.
NEWS
By Thomas F. Schaller | August 26, 2008
DENVER - In the 1930s, Colorado officials realized they were facing a long-term water problem because the Continental Divide channels about 80 percent of rain and snowmelt westward toward neighboring states and, ultimately, the Pacific Ocean. But most of the population of the state lives east of the Rockies, in the Front Range. So Colorado politicians decided to dig tunnels through the Rockies, creating man-made arterials that redirect waters eastward to those burgeoning, thirsty counties.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover and Jules Witcover,Staff Writer | October 25, 1992
DETROIT -- When you hear or read the term Rust Belt, yo think of Detroit. It is a city that, for all the valiant local efforts to keep it up and running, is in many ways simply rusting away. Its shuttered windows and abandoned auto plants give parts of downtown and environs a ghost-town look, and it symbolizes the political challenge that faces President Bush all across the industrial Midwest in this election, and even into the adjacent Plains states.Four years ago, George Bush carried nine of the 12 states in the Midwest, sweeping the most heavily industrial of them -- Michigan, Ohio and Illinois -- and losing only Minnesota, Wisconsin and Iowa.
BUSINESS
By Sylvia Nasar and Sylvia Nasar,New York Times News Service | February 6, 1991
In the last recession, America's aging industrial heartland was widely considered to be incapable of saving itself.But a government report issued Monday suggests that the Rust Belt has staged a renaissance on the factory floor. Thanks to a wrenching contraction in payrolls and plants, productivity -- the measure of output per hours worked -- climbed to a record level in 1990.What is more, factories making everything from chemicals to cars now account for a robust 23.3 percent of the nation's gross national product, or the total cost of goods and services sold.
NEWS
By Andrew Wainer | December 26, 2013
In the midst of the debate over the largest potential immigration reform legislation in 50 years, American communities struggling with decades of population loss and economic decline are being revitalized by newcomers. The economic contribution of immigrants in high-skilled fields is relatively well-known, but less acknowledged are the contributions that "blue collar" immigrants make in revitalizing depressed communities and economies, both as manual laborers and small business entrepreneurs.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins and Jamie Smith Hopkins,Sun reporter | November 16, 2007
Baltimore left the Rust Belt behind years ago, but local economic development marketers think the metro area has yet to shed the reputation of a struggling manufacturing hub. They want to get out-of-town companies and locals to think of the Baltimore region as an equal of affluent Seattle, Denver and San Diego, rather than besieged Cleveland and Detroit, its historical peers. The Economic Alliance of Greater Baltimore, a nonprofit partnership between government and business to encourage economic growth, released a "progress report" last night that makes the argument by marshaling facts about changes in the Baltimore area since the start of the decade.
NEWS
By Scott Wilson and Scott Wilson,SUN STAFF | May 2, 1996
Despite months of bickering between his administration and the school board, County Executive John G. Gary presented yesterday a budget for the coming fiscal year that looks to education as the county's financial savior.At the same time, Mr. Gary rekindled a long-standing political fight with Annapolis officials by formally proposing an increase in the property tax rate that Anne Arundel charges city landowners. The City Council is expected to meet privately this morning to consider filing a lawsuit challenging Mr. Gary's plan.
NEWS
By THEO LIPPMAN JR | July 23, 1992
THE RUST BELT tour of Bill Clinton and Albert Gore Jr. is a reminder that there's more to the Electoral College, despite what wise guys like me keep saying, than the South and the West.If the Democrats are going to win the presidency in November they have to carry most of the states along the route of this week's bus-capade: New Jersey, Pennsylvania, West Virginia, Ohio, Kentucky, Indiana, Illinois and Missouri.Those eight states have 117 electoral votes. The South has more (147), but the Rust Belt (that 117 plus Michigan's 18)
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins and Jamie Smith Hopkins,Sun reporter | November 16, 2007
Baltimore left the Rust Belt behind years ago, but local economic development marketers think the metro area has yet to shed the reputation of a struggling manufacturing hub. They want to get out-of-town companies and locals to think of the Baltimore region as an equal of affluent Seattle, Denver and San Diego, rather than besieged Cleveland and Detroit, its historical peers. The Economic Alliance of Greater Baltimore, a nonprofit partnership between government and business to encourage economic growth, released a "progress report" last night that makes the argument by marshaling facts about changes in the Baltimore area since the start of the decade.
NEWS
By ERIC SIEGEL | May 3, 2007
WITH LAST WEEK'S news that Toyota had surpassed General Motors as the world's most prolific carmaker, and the coming 40th anniversaries of many of the urban riots of the 1960s, I decided to reread Thomas Sugrue?s The Origins of the Urban Crisis: Race and Inequality in Postwar Detroit. First published in 1996 by Princeton University Press, and reissued two years ago, the widely acclaimed book is about the erstwhile Motor City but has broader applications; as Sugrue wrote in the original version, "Detroit's journey from urban heyday to urban crisis has been mirrored in other cities across the nation."
NEWS
By James Gerstenzang and Ronald Brownstein and James Gerstenzang and Ronald Brownstein,LOS ANGELES TIMES | October 27, 2006
WARREN, MICH. -- President Bush and his predecessor, Bill Clinton, campaigned for congressional candidates across the nation's Rust Belt yesterday, speaking on issues that could spell the difference in determining control of the House and the Senate in the midterm election. At fundraising receptions in Iowa and Michigan, Bush returned to "family values," denouncing a New Jersey Supreme Court ruling that same-sex couples are guaranteed the rights and benefits of marriage. Clinton, speaking at a rally for Democratic congressional and state legislative candidates in Syracuse, N.Y., responded to Bush's recent characterization of the Democrats as "the party of cut and run" in Iraq.
BUSINESS
By JAMIE SMITH HOPKINS and JAMIE SMITH HOPKINS,SUN REPORTER | January 4, 2006
The Baltimore region is looking less and less like its struggling Rust Belt peers as it adds to its population, employment base and R&D prowess, but high crime remains a stumbling block as it competes for business development, according to a study released yesterday by three local groups. The Greater Baltimore State of the Region 2005 report, compiled approximately every other year by the Greater Baltimore Committee, the Economic Alliance of Greater Baltimore and the Baltimore Metropolitan Council, highlights local strengths and weaknesses by ranking the area against 19 other regions, including neighbors such as Washington, high-tech hubs such as Seattle and other old manufacturing strongholds such as Cleveland.
NEWS
July 7, 2004
FLIRTATIONS with Republican John McCain aside, the selection of North Carolina Sen. John Edwards as John Kerry's running mate seems so natural that one can only wonder why it took months to make the decision. In the Democratic primaries, the 51-year-old Mr. Edwards proved a sizzling campaigner. He wasn't a Washington insider, or a multi-star general, or even a candidate who necessarily would broaden the party's base. Yet his "two Americas" message excited hard-core Democrats and working-class voters this spring in a way that Mr. Kerry hasn't always been able to match.
NEWS
By Francis X. Clines and Francis X. Clines,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | March 11, 2002
CHESTER, W.Va. - The sense of mortality can seem overwhelming along the depressed Ohio River Valley as Big Steel heads into the Big Sleep and hundreds of dish and pottery factories - the valley's old artisan glory - dwindle to a precious few. But wait: A gray-haired retiree bused in from Pittsburgh has just hit the big payoff in nickels over at the video slots in a flourishing gambling oasis called Speakeasy. Outside, beyond the gleeful bonging and beeping of the 2,000 slot machines, an ultramodern racetrack is being groomed for another night of thoroughbred betting by blue-collar commuters from Ohio searching for merciful odds along a riverfront dotted with snow patches and abandoned factories.
NEWS
February 28, 1991
J. Fife Symington III has been elected governor of Arizona in a runoff election. He is from Lutherville, and his Maryland upbringing may help him in his tough new job.Arizona is to this era what Maryland was in a previous one -- best known nationally for high-level political high-jinks. The last elected governor was impeached, both its U.S. senators are under investigation for ethical lapses in connection with the savings and loan scandals, and seven members of the state legislature recently got caught in a televised "sting" operation involving bribes and campaign contributions.
NEWS
By Thomas F. Schaller | August 26, 2008
DENVER - In the 1930s, Colorado officials realized they were facing a long-term water problem because the Continental Divide channels about 80 percent of rain and snowmelt westward toward neighboring states and, ultimately, the Pacific Ocean. But most of the population of the state lives east of the Rockies, in the Front Range. So Colorado politicians decided to dig tunnels through the Rockies, creating man-made arterials that redirect waters eastward to those burgeoning, thirsty counties.
NEWS
By Jack W. Germond and Jack W. Germond,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | July 13, 2000
HARRISBURG, Pa. - Vice President Al Gore turned up in Philadelphia one day last week and then in Pittsburgh two days later. The presumed Democratic presidential nominee is spending a lot of time in Pennsylvania these days - a dozen visits in the past year or so. As T. J. Rooney, the 35-year-old state legislator from Bethlehem serving as Gore's point man for the state, puts it, "He's definitely spending the requisite amount of time." Gov. George W. Bush of Texas, Gore's Republican rival, is here almost as often.
NEWS
By Jack W. Germond and Jules Witcover | April 10, 2000
WASHINGTON -- This is the silly season in the presidential campaign. It is like spring training for baseball teams when anything seems possible. The campaigns of Vice President Al Gore and Gov. George W. Bush of Texas are purveying ideas about the shape of the race that are either uninformed nonsense or deliberate misinformation. Thus, Mr. Gore and his managers are behaving as if there were a realistic chance that he could carry Florida in the general election in November. Mr. Bush and his strategists are taking a similar tack about California.
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