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By Kathy Lally and Kathy Lally,Moscow Bureau of The Sun | March 19, 1995
ST. PETERSBURG, Russia -- After 75 years of exhausting liberation, Russian women are longing to put down their jackhammers and go back to their kitchens and children.Western-style feminism is widely regarded with suspicion here, where women found drudgery instead of opportunity when communism opened the world of work to them. The emancipated Soviet woman was expected to lay bricks all day, then shop, cook, clean, and coddle her husband and children.Today, she's ready for a little role reversal.
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FEATURES
By Michael Gold and The Baltimore Sun | August 18, 2013
Let's start with facts: Two members of the Russian women's 4x400-meter relay team, Kseniya Ryzhova and Tatyana Firova, kissed on the podium after their team won gold Saturday at the World Athletics Championship in Moscow. The smooch sparked a huge response, with many on Twitter and in several media outlets (especially Spanish-language ones, judging by my search last night) framing it as a protest against Russia's "gay propaganda" law. It may have been a stand of solidarity with the LGBT community.
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NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | February 11, 1993
MOSCOW -- Lyudmila Zakharevich, 16, tops her class at an elite Moscow high school, but instead of planning a career, she dreams of becoming a full-time housewife.Lena Guzeeva, 22, on the other hand, desperately wants a professional position in one of the new private businesses in her central Russian city but worries that sexual exploitation has become so accepted that she will be jobless unless she agrees to submit to a potential employer's advances.And Natalya Zhdanova, 48, who was laid off from her job as a top engineer at a military-industrial plant and is working as an after-school, day-care supervisor at the local school, is bitter that the career she had for 25 years under Soviet rule is now out of her reach because it is part of the men-only world of the new Russia.
NEWS
By Erika Niedowski and Erika Niedowski,Sun staff | February 4, 2007
MOSCOW -- Vladimir Rakovsky glides around dressed in black with the air of a guru -- albeit a self-appointed one -- as he holds forth before a group of admiring students on the virtues of womanly wiles. This softly lit room on the second floor of a Moscow theater is as appropriate a place as any to stage a master class for women on how to act -- literally -- to get men, and what they want from men. This, according to the name of Rakovsky's class, is known as stervologiya, or the art of being a sterva,which in Russian means, literally, "bitch."
NEWS
By Erika Niedowski and Erika Niedowski,Sun staff | February 4, 2007
MOSCOW -- Vladimir Rakovsky glides around dressed in black with the air of a guru -- albeit a self-appointed one -- as he holds forth before a group of admiring students on the virtues of womanly wiles. This softly lit room on the second floor of a Moscow theater is as appropriate a place as any to stage a master class for women on how to act -- literally -- to get men, and what they want from men. This, according to the name of Rakovsky's class, is known as stervologiya, or the art of being a sterva,which in Russian means, literally, "bitch."
NEWS
By Dan Rodricks | March 10, 2000
SIX WORDS I never thought I'd write, about something I never thought I'd see: eight Russian women on pogo sticks. The Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey Circus is back in town, once again, bringing to the Baltimore Arena (nee Civic Center) death-defying aerialists, dancing poodles, clowns in big pants, a guy in tight pants who does a backward somersault on a high wire, a motorcycling family inside a steel cage and ... And eight Russian women on pogo sticks. Sorry for the emphasis on what's listed in the Ringling media guide as "Pogo Stick Act," but it stunned my sleep-deprived eyes and jarred my weary midwinter mind.
FEATURES
By Bill Marvel and Bill Marvel,Dallas Morning News | November 13, 1991
American media have not been kind to Soviet women over the decades. In magazines and newspapers, on television and in movies, they have been depicted as drab, dour, built like locomotives those, at any rate, who were not gymnasts, ballet dancers or Raisa Gorbechev. They are always working over a tractor on the collective farm or standing on line for a loaf of bread, stockings at half-mast, clutching a shopping bag.On the contrary, according to American beauticians and cosmetologists who recently visited Leningrad and Moscow, Russian women are as eager as their Western counterparts to look glamorous and alluring.
NEWS
By SARA ENGRAM | January 16, 1994
President Clinton's visit to Russia last week caused less stir than once greeted Western leaders. Many Russians were eager to meet the new president, but more memorable than the photo ops were the street scenes from Moscow depicting ordinary Russians preoccupied with the twin trials of winter and economic turmoil.Many of the grim faces belonged to women, who in Russia (as in many societies) shoulder most of the day-to-day burdens of keeping a household running. Much of the talk about the Russian economy these days focuses on the ratio of shock to therapy in pushing along the economy.
FEATURES
By Michael Gold and The Baltimore Sun | August 18, 2013
Let's start with facts: Two members of the Russian women's 4x400-meter relay team, Kseniya Ryzhova and Tatyana Firova, kissed on the podium after their team won gold Saturday at the World Athletics Championship in Moscow. The smooch sparked a huge response, with many on Twitter and in several media outlets (especially Spanish-language ones, judging by my search last night) framing it as a protest against Russia's "gay propaganda" law. It may have been a stand of solidarity with the LGBT community.
NEWS
By Deutsche Presse-Agentur | November 22, 1990
FERRARA, Italy -- The name of Luciano Peverati's marriage agency here sounds at once homey and futuristic: the Domestic Hearth 2000. But it's no more odd than the agency's latest service: Russian women for Italian men.Matchmaker Peverati, an energetic, well-traveled 47-year-old, said he began importing brides because the home-grown variety is not mobile."
SPORTS
By PAUL MCMULLEN and PAUL MCMULLEN,SUN REPORTER | October 16, 2005
A man from Ukraine and a Russian woman used their local knowledge to claim the marathon titles in the fifth annual Under Armour Baltimore Running Festival. Mykola Antonenko, 33, jogged through a mediocre half-marathon here a year ago, but made a mental note about a hilly stretch in the northeast section of the city. That's where he began a prolonged surge yesterday morning in the marathon that separated him from a lead pack of eight. He finished in 2 hours, 15 minutes, 40 seconds, and ended Kenya's grip on the men's title.
SPORTS
By Diane Pucin and Diane Pucin,LOS ANGELES TIMES | September 11, 2004
NEW YORK - Lindsay Davenport had played all summer without the pain in her knee or foot that had troubled her for nearly two years. Since Wimbledon, Davenport had been sound. Her ground strokes were flawless. Her serve had become a major plus, winning her easy points and making the game fun. Until yesterday, a day that belonged to the Russians, with two of their women advancing to the U.S. Open final for the first time - each defeating an American. For Davenport, a groin muscle that was stiff after practice Thursday was achy after warm-ups yesterday and became punishingly painful by the middle of her semifinal match against 19-year-old Svetlana Kuznetsova, a strong, athletic opponent.
FEATURES
By Rob Hiaasen and Rob Hiaasen,SUN STAFF | March 21, 2001
BETHESDA - Cruising a video library, two older men sit behind a strategically placed bookshelf. Beyond this partition, a party is in full swing, people mixing with their mixed drinks in a room where a full-length bearskin hogs a wall. But the television screen is the focus, lighting the faces of the men as they stare at a young Russian woman, who, for business purposes, is known as No. 2. No. 2 sways on a stool, posing. Beautiful, no? The men picked her out from a photo album. Finding the corresponding tape, the men then plugged in the video.
NEWS
By Hal Piper and Hal Piper,SUN STAFF | August 25, 2000
In 1974 a New York Times reporter named Christopher Wren was among the first American mountaineers permitted to climb the 23,405-foot Lenin Peak in Soviet Tajikistan, on the Chinese border. High on the mountain a two-day storm forced the party to dig in and wait. When the weather cleared and the ascent resumed, Wren and his colleagues began to find bodies in the snow. There were eight in all - a Russian women's team that had been only 1,000 feet above the Americans, but too exposed to ride out the storm.
NEWS
By Dan Rodricks | March 10, 2000
SIX WORDS I never thought I'd write, about something I never thought I'd see: eight Russian women on pogo sticks. The Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey Circus is back in town, once again, bringing to the Baltimore Arena (nee Civic Center) death-defying aerialists, dancing poodles, clowns in big pants, a guy in tight pants who does a backward somersault on a high wire, a motorcycling family inside a steel cage and ... And eight Russian women on pogo sticks. Sorry for the emphasis on what's listed in the Ringling media guide as "Pogo Stick Act," but it stunned my sleep-deprived eyes and jarred my weary midwinter mind.
NEWS
By Kathy Lally and Kathy Lally,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | February 8, 2000
MOSCOW -- During the Cold War era, Soviet women looked like so many ballistic missiles, their bodies molded into hard, imposing lines by the unlovely and unforgiving underwear of the day. All that changed after Russia began to project a come-hither image to the rest of the world. Now, women's underwear is soft, beautiful and sexy, especially the bra. The bra has shed its rocket-ship-nose-cone past and has turned up on advertising posters all over Moscow -- lacy, racy, round, usually French or Italian.
FEATURES
By Rob Hiaasen and Rob Hiaasen,SUN STAFF | March 21, 2001
BETHESDA - Cruising a video library, two older men sit behind a strategically placed bookshelf. Beyond this partition, a party is in full swing, people mixing with their mixed drinks in a room where a full-length bearskin hogs a wall. But the television screen is the focus, lighting the faces of the men as they stare at a young Russian woman, who, for business purposes, is known as No. 2. No. 2 sways on a stool, posing. Beautiful, no? The men picked her out from a photo album. Finding the corresponding tape, the men then plugged in the video.
NEWS
By Hal Piper | February 15, 1997
THE LATEST LETTER from Natasha in Moscow is like the others. Things are bad and getting worse. ''We don't know what will become of us.''Russians were always a pessimistic people, but then they have always had much to be pessimistic about. A Moscow joke: The optimist sighs, ''At least things can't get worse.'' ''Sure they can,'' beams the pessimist.Liberation from communism has been a mixed blessing. Russians lost an empire and an ideology. Most Russians were savvy enough to mock the state myth that they were history's favored children, leading mankind's happy march to a radiant future.
NEWS
By Will Englund and Will Englund,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | February 1, 1998
MOSCOW -- Fascinated by Bill Clinton and Monica Lewinsky, Russians are examining their own sexual morals in light of the big American scandal -- and not finding too much to worry about.Adultery? A status symbol for the new rich.Sexual harassment? So common that hardly anyone can see it as such.Even women's advocates agree that a sex scandal like the one consuming Washington could never happen here."Of course there should be limits," Iren Andreyeva, a former member of parliament, said in Izvestia last week, "but if it became known that Yeltsin paid extra attention to a woman in his office, I wouldn't consider it a minus.
NEWS
March 16, 1997
ONCE there was another Cal playing for the Orioles: left-handed, and an outfielder, but a favorite with the fans. Cal Abrams, this was, the team's leading hitter in 1954.In that first year of the Orioles' return to the American League, they lacked for offense (52 was the whole team's homer total; afterward, the fence was moved in). With his team playing most of the season in last place, it was nice having one man who could hit -- Abrams, in what turned out to be the high point of his eight-year career, batted .293.
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