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By Jackie Powder and Jackie Powder,Sun Staff Writer | May 30, 1994
American World War II veteran Victor Ostrow embraced Russian soldiers yesterday for the first time since a meeting at the Elbe River in Germany nearly 50 years ago.The occasion was a Memorial Day observance at the Owings Mills Jewish Community Center organized by the American Jewish War Veterans. About 150 American veterans and 40 of their Russian comrades attended."What made me very happy was when I saw my Russian brethren," said Mr. Ostrow of Silver Spring, who fought with the Army's 69th Infantry Division in Europe.
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NEWS
By FROM SUN NEWS SERVICES | October 19, 2008
Russian soldiers killed by rebels near Chechnya ROSTOV-ON-DON, Russia : At least two Russian soldiers were killed and 10 others were wounded yesterday when rebels ambushed a military convoy in a volatile Russian province near Chechnya, officials said. The Russian Interior Ministry in the southern province of Ingushetia said about a dozen militants ambushed a military convoy on a forest road in the Sunzha region yesterday. It said in a statement that the attackers fired automatic weapons and grenades at military trucks, killing two soldiers and wounding others.
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NEWS
By Kathy Lally and Kathy Lally,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | November 4, 1999
MOSCOW -- The women, babies in their arms, children at their sides, stand against the coils of barbed wire, shouting at the Russian soldiers before them in anger and desperation, crying in helplessness and fear or simply shocked into miserable silence.Behind them, perhaps 10,000 other refugees press forward, straining to escape the destruction of war-torn Chechnya. The women at the front struggle to stand up. The barbed wire tears at their skirts. The soldiers let only a few stumble through.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | April 28, 2007
MOSCOW -- A Russian military helicopter crashed during a combat mission against separatist guerrillas in Russia's southern republic of Chechnya yesterday, killing at least 18 soldiers, authorities said. Initial reports said the craft was brought down by rebel fire, but officials said later that mechanical failure was more likely the cause. Three insurgents were also reported killed in the battle, but others apparently escaped into nearby mountains. The exact death toll remained unclear, with the Russian news agency RIA Novosti citing an unnamed local security source, reporting yesterday evening that 20 severely burned bodies had been found near the crash site.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | January 23, 1996
TERECHNOYE, Russia -- Shopkeeper Vakhid Umarov was watching the aerial bombardment of Pervomayskoye from the bird's-eye view of this adjacent village last week when two Russian soldiers scampered out of their frozen foxhole to propose a deal."
NEWS
By Will Englund and Will Englund,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | November 27, 1999
MOSCOW -- The heaviest bombardment of the war rained onto Grozny yesterday, as a Russian general said his forces were about to open a new and presumably final phase of the fighting in Chechnya.Gen. Valery Manilov talked of pursuing Chechen rebels into the mountains and wrapping up the war before New Year's.Until now Russian tactics have met with success and federal forces have penetrated deep into the breakaway republic without having to fight a pitched battle. There's a full-speed-ahead mood in Moscow.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | March 20, 1995
ACHKOI-MARTAN, Russia -- If Russian forces have suffered heavy casualties in their three-month war with secessionist Chechnya, they can start by looking at themselves. Across the breakaway republic, Russian troops are selling weapons to the very rebels they are fighting."It's nonsense. They sell us weapons that are used to kill them," said Lom-Ali Shamayev, a 34-year-old Chechen businessman with a New York address who bankrolls his own band of 116 guerrillas.Mr. Shamayev is one of the Russians' best customers, but there are reportedly many others.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | October 31, 1992
MOSCOW -- Rebuffed by international criticism, Russia yesterday retreated from its decision to link a withdrawal of troops from the Baltic states to improved conditions for Russians living in Latvia, Lithuania and Estonia.But Col. Gen. Boris V. Gromov, the Russian deputy defense minister, warned it was "unlikely" that all Russian soldiers would be gone by 1994, as the Baltic states demand.Housing shortages in Russia and the immense cost of relocating troops have forced Moscow to push back its troop withdrawal plans.
NEWS
By Will Englund and Will Englund,Moscow Bureau of The Sun | March 11, 1995
MOSCOW -- Powerless to hasten a Russian victory in Chechnya or do anything else that might affect the fighting there, the lower house of parliament lashed out yesterday at the war's most prominent critic, Sergei Kovalyov, by stripping him of his post as Russia's human rights commissioner.Mr. Kovalyov had spent the early weeks of the war in the Chechen capital, Grozny, interposing himself between the Russian military and the president of the breakaway republic, Dzhokhar M. Dudayev. Mr. Kovalyov called on Russian soldiers not to attack; after the assault began, he began documenting human rights abuses and calling them to the world's attention.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | December 5, 1999
MOSCOW -- As Russian troops completed their encirclement of Chechnya's capital yesterday, new accounts from survivors bolstered charges that Russian soldiers had killed about 40 civilians Friday in an attack on a convoy of refugees.Russian military officials continued to deny the reports, which first appeared on the semiofficial Itar-Tass news service, calling them disinformation.Radio Liberty, the U.S. broadcast service, quoted witnesses who said the soldiers opened fire on the white-flagged convoy of seven automobiles and a bus Friday morning as the vehicles paused at a military checkpoint south of the Chechen capital, Grozny.
NEWS
By Douglas Birch and Douglas Birch,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | October 3, 2003
GROZNY, Chechnya - With an election for choosing the next president of Chechnya only days away, officials in this broken, pulverized city are gripped by an almost surreal optimism. Everything is secure, they cheerfully say, despite frequent attacks on Russian troops by Chechen rebels and the nightly crackle of gunfire. Civilians feel increasingly safe, the officials boast, though Chechens themselves say they fear both the rebels fighting for independence and the Russian soldiers. And voters feel confident that the election Sunday will be fair, organizers insist, even though human rights groups allege that the vote is rigged to favor the Kremlin's favored presidential candidate, Akhmad Kadyrov.
NEWS
By David Holley and David Holley,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 18, 2003
MOSCOW - A top official in Chechnya's Moscow-backed government said yesterday that Russian soldiers there may be responsible for as many as 300 kidnappings of civilians last year - but that he saw nothing unusual in that. "Yes, there are crimes, there are kidnappings, and some of them involve servicemen," Chechen Prime Minister Anatoly Popov said at a Moscow news conference, citing statistics from a report by Chechen prosecutor Vladimir Kravchenko. "This is not a classified report, but the results of the prosecutors' work in 2002.
NEWS
By Alex Rodriguez and Alex Rodriguez,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 28, 2002
MOSCOW - Two suicide bombers in trucks rammed through security gates at the headquarters for Chechnya's Kremlin-backed government yesterday and detonated powerful blasts, killing at least 46 people in an attack Moscow linked to Chechen separatists. Many of the victims were in the building's first-floor dining hall. Dozens of dazed survivors staggered from the rubble, some with faces covered in blood. Bodies were found hundreds of yards from the building. Emergency rescue officials estimated the number injured at 70, though they said that count would probably rise.
NEWS
By Douglas Birch and Douglas Birch,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | July 25, 2002
MOSCOW - A prominent human rights group says Russian authorities are pressuring tens of thousands of Chechen refugees living in camps to return to their homes, where they risk being kidnapped and murdered by Russian troops. "The situation in Chechnya is really desperate," said Aaron Rhodes, executive director of the International Helsinki Federation for Human Rights. "The population of Chechnya is terrorized by the Russian forces, and these people in the camps are terrified of returning there."
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | October 22, 2000
GROZNY, Russia - Zura Uzuyeva was cleaning the dishes in the courtyard of her small brick home in the Oktyabrsky district of the Chechen capital last week when the staccato drone of a Russian attack helicopter permeated the neighborhood, the volume rising as it approached. "My wife had called us to dinner, and we had been sitting at the table, all four of us," said her husband, Shamsudin Uzuyev, a former high school principal and teacher of chemistry and biology. "My sons and I then went inside, and she stayed there in the courtyard to wash.
TOPIC
By LEONARD S. RUBENSTEIN AND NATHANIEL RAYMOND | May 14, 2000
DR. HASAN Baiyev opened a small war hospital in the village of Alkhan-Kala, his hometown in Chechnya, at the first clash between Chechen insurgents and the Russian army in 1994. The one-story cement block building contained few medical supplies and a staff of just eight nurses and a handful of volunteers. Baiyev was the sole physician. Refusing to side with either, he treated soldier and civilian, Chechen or Russian. "My plan was to stay despite the bombs and the shelling, to stay until the last minute," he said.
TOPIC
By LEONARD S. RUBENSTEIN AND NATHANIEL RAYMOND | May 14, 2000
DR. HASAN Baiyev opened a small war hospital in the village of Alkhan-Kala, his hometown in Chechnya, at the first clash between Chechen insurgents and the Russian army in 1994. The one-story cement block building contained few medical supplies and a staff of just eight nurses and a handful of volunteers. Baiyev was the sole physician. Refusing to side with either, he treated soldier and civilian, Chechen or Russian. "My plan was to stay despite the bombs and the shelling, to stay until the last minute," he said.
NEWS
By FROM SUN NEWS SERVICES | October 19, 2008
Russian soldiers killed by rebels near Chechnya ROSTOV-ON-DON, Russia : At least two Russian soldiers were killed and 10 others were wounded yesterday when rebels ambushed a military convoy in a volatile Russian province near Chechnya, officials said. The Russian Interior Ministry in the southern province of Ingushetia said about a dozen militants ambushed a military convoy on a forest road in the Sunzha region yesterday. It said in a statement that the attackers fired automatic weapons and grenades at military trucks, killing two soldiers and wounding others.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | December 5, 1999
MOSCOW -- As Russian troops completed their encirclement of Chechnya's capital yesterday, new accounts from survivors bolstered charges that Russian soldiers had killed about 40 civilians Friday in an attack on a convoy of refugees.Russian military officials continued to deny the reports, which first appeared on the semiofficial Itar-Tass news service, calling them disinformation.Radio Liberty, the U.S. broadcast service, quoted witnesses who said the soldiers opened fire on the white-flagged convoy of seven automobiles and a bus Friday morning as the vehicles paused at a military checkpoint south of the Chechen capital, Grozny.
NEWS
By Will Englund and Will Englund,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | November 27, 1999
MOSCOW -- The heaviest bombardment of the war rained onto Grozny yesterday, as a Russian general said his forces were about to open a new and presumably final phase of the fighting in Chechnya.Gen. Valery Manilov talked of pursuing Chechen rebels into the mountains and wrapping up the war before New Year's.Until now Russian tactics have met with success and federal forces have penetrated deep into the breakaway republic without having to fight a pitched battle. There's a full-speed-ahead mood in Moscow.
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