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Russian Roulette

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NEWS
By James Gleick | December 15, 1993
THERE'S a kind of self-deception familiar to gamblers everywhere.You make a rule for yourself ("I'm going to leave the roulette table when I'm down $200") and when the crucial moment comes, you find a reason to break it ("I just remembered that red is my lucky color").The late physicist Richard Feynman caught the space agency at precisely this game in 1986, when he served on the presidential commission investigating the explosion of the space shuttle Challenger.He found that the National Aeronautics and Space Administration was setting safety standards and then bending them at the last minute as needed.
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NEWS
By Thomas Sowell | August 18, 2005
IMMIGRATION HAS joined the long list of subjects on which it is taboo to talk sense in plain English. At the heart of much confusion about immigration is the notion that we "need" immigrants - legal or illegal - to do work that Americans won't do. What we "need" depends on what it costs and what we are willing to pay. Leaving prices out of the picture is probably the source of more fallacies in economics than any other single misconception. At current wages for low-level jobs and current levels of welfare, there are indeed many jobs that Americans will not take.
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NEWS
By Del Quentin Wilber and Del Quentin Wilber,SUN STAFF | March 27, 2003
A 15-year-old West Baltimore boy was charged yesterday as a juvenile with second-degree murder in the accidental shooting of a friend Tuesday night, police said yesterday. The shooting occurred about 9 p.m. in the boy's house in the 1500 block of Myrtle Ave. where he and his friend Terron Braxton, 18, were playing Russian roulette, police said. Police said the boy and Braxton had been playing the game for about a week with an empty .38-caliber revolver. They decided Tuesday to put a single round in the cylinder, police said.
SPORTS
By David Steele | November 4, 2004
IT TOOK JUST one upset, one titanic tumble from the top of the polls, one stampede of students toward the goal posts, to make the Atlantic Coast Conference realize that the sky is indeed the limit. OK. Two, actually. Two upsets, tumbles and stampedes, three hours apart in College Park, Md., and Chapel Hill, N.C., last Saturday night. The twin killings of Florida State and Miami, respectively, shook up the newly aligned, still-mutating conference nicely. Shook it up so well that even the honchos at the vanquished schools appreciated and admired what had happened.
NEWS
By Del Quentin Wilber and Del Quentin Wilber,SUN STAFF | April 26, 2003
A 15-year-old boy admitted yesterday in Baltimore juvenile court that he accidentally shot and killed a friend during a game of Russian roulette last month. The boy quietly admitted to manslaughter and handgun possession charges in the killing of Terron Braxton, 18. Admitting to charges in juvenile court is the equivalent of pleading guilty in adult court. In exchange for admitting to manslaughter and handgun possession, prosecutors dropped a second-degree murder charge. The Sun does not report the names of children charged with crimes as juveniles.
SPORTS
By Joe Strauss and Joe Strauss,SUN STAFF | October 12, 2001
New York Yankees manager Joe Torre resurrected an old debate yesterday by likening the best-of-five Division Series format to "Russian roulette" that can neutralize stronger teams. "I think you're under the gun. It's very tough. You'd like to have it four-of-seven in the first series, but which one do you make three-of-five? I don't know. I've never been fond of these things but you understand that these things are very tough," said Torre. "You can't think beyond today at all in a best-of-five series.
SPORTS
By Ross Peddicord | October 2, 1993
Pimlico/Laurel president Joe De Francis again said yesterday that he will not trigger the Russian Roulette clause of a stockholders agreement that he has with his minority partners, Tom and Bob Manfuso, that could lead him to sell or buy them out."Theoretically it is possible that the Manfusos could gain control of the tracks," De Francis said. "But it would only come after all judicial procedures were exhausted and if they offer to sell at an outrageous price. I won't pay any price unimaginable to buy them out. But I will pay a reasonable amount."
SPORTS
By Ross Peddicord and Ross Peddicord,Staff Writer | November 22, 1993
Laurel/Pimlico track operator Joe De Francis said yesterday he will drop an attempt to appeal the Russian roulette clause of a stockholders' agreement and all other litigation that he has filed against his estranged partners, Tom and Bob Manfuso, if they will end the legal and track ownership disputes that they have with him.It is part of the settlement offer that he has made to the Manfusos in an attempt to hasten the resolution of the ownership feud that...
SPORTS
By ROSS PEDDICORD and ROSS PEDDICORD,STAFF WRITER | September 15, 1993
Bob and Tom Manfuso, minority partners in the ownership of '' Pimlico and Laurel race courses, are ready to trigger a "Russian roulette" clause in a stockholders agreement that could lead them to either take over or sell their interests in the two tracks.In a letter dated Sept. 1 and received by the Maryland Racing Commission on Sept. 3, the Manfuso brothers formally notified the board that they "intend to invoke a buy/sell" provision in a stockholders agreement "on or about Oct. 1."Under the provision, also known as a "Russian roulette" clause, the Manfusos can set a price and offer to sell their stock to majority owner Joe De Francis and his other partners, Karin De Francis Van Dyke and Martin Jacobs.
NEWS
By Kris Antonelli and Kris Antonelli,Staff writer | April 5, 1992
A 12-year-old girl was shot to death yesterday afternoon by a 15-year-old boy playing with a handgun in a West Baltimore rowhouse, city police said.Janet Paula Edwards of the 1300 block of Riggs Ave. was pronounced dead shortly after she arrived at University of Maryland Medical Center, said her grandmother, Beatrice Banks."
FEATURES
By Lisa Pollak and Lisa Pollak,SUN STAFF | July 11, 2003
RICHMOND, Va. - The war is over. Or so people have told him, yelling out car windows - Don't you read the paper? - as they drive past his sign. Of course, if the war were over, Larry Syverson wouldn't be out there in the first place. He could spend his lunch hours sitting in an air-conditioned restaurant instead of standing on the sidewalk in front of the federal courthouse in the midday heat. He could stop fearing the crunch of an unfamiliar car on his gravel driveway, followed by the knock of a stranger with news about his sons.
NEWS
By Del Quentin Wilber and Del Quentin Wilber,SUN STAFF | April 26, 2003
A 15-year-old boy admitted yesterday in Baltimore juvenile court that he accidentally shot and killed a friend during a game of Russian roulette last month. The boy quietly admitted to manslaughter and handgun possession charges in the killing of Terron Braxton, 18. Admitting to charges in juvenile court is the equivalent of pleading guilty in adult court. In exchange for admitting to manslaughter and handgun possession, prosecutors dropped a second-degree murder charge. The Sun does not report the names of children charged with crimes as juveniles.
NEWS
By Del Quentin Wilber and Del Quentin Wilber,SUN STAFF | March 27, 2003
A 15-year-old West Baltimore boy was charged yesterday as a juvenile with second-degree murder in the accidental shooting of a friend Tuesday night, police said yesterday. The shooting occurred about 9 p.m. in the boy's house in the 1500 block of Myrtle Ave. where he and his friend Terron Braxton, 18, were playing Russian roulette, police said. Police said the boy and Braxton had been playing the game for about a week with an empty .38-caliber revolver. They decided Tuesday to put a single round in the cylinder, police said.
SPORTS
By Joe Strauss and Joe Strauss,SUN STAFF | October 12, 2001
New York Yankees manager Joe Torre resurrected an old debate yesterday by likening the best-of-five Division Series format to "Russian roulette" that can neutralize stronger teams. "I think you're under the gun. It's very tough. You'd like to have it four-of-seven in the first series, but which one do you make three-of-five? I don't know. I've never been fond of these things but you understand that these things are very tough," said Torre. "You can't think beyond today at all in a best-of-five series.
NEWS
By George F. Will | June 22, 2001
WASHINGTON -- Fred Allen, a mordantly sophisticated radio performer, died (mercifully, if not causally) just as television was permeating America, in 1956. He warned us: "Imitation is the sincerest form of television." So there will be imitations of "Fear Factor." That NBC program, in its first episode last week, attracted nearly 12 million voyeurs to watch simpletons confront their fears, for a fee. In that episode, confronters were covered by a swarm of biting rats. This week the program featured a willingness to eat worms.
NEWS
By Joan Jacobson and Joan Jacobson,SUN STAFF | September 12, 1997
Mary Chambers never believed what Baltimore County police told her about her daughter's death -- that Brandy Lynn Noel committed suicide in May 1996 by shooting herself in the head.Yesterday, police detectives' original theory of suicide was proved wrong as a 20-year-old West Virginia man pleaded guilty to involuntary manslaughter in the death of the 16-year-old Dundalk girl.Nicholas Jachelski -- who faces a possible 10-year sentence -- admitted participating in Noel's death during a Russian roulette game at the Dundalk home of a Jachelski relative, where Noel had spent the night.
SPORTS
By Ross Peddicord and Ross Peddicord,Staff Writer | August 11, 1993
Is anyone ready to play Russian roulette -- with racetracks?Now that a Baltimore City Circuit Court judge has declared that a disputed buyout clause between the estranged partners of Pimlico and Laurel race courses is valid, is either side ready to trigger a deal to buy out the other?Under a provision made four years ago in a stockholders agreement between majority owner Joe De Francis and his minority partners, Bob and Tom Manfuso, either side may offer its share for sale at any price after Oct. 1, 1993.
SPORTS
By Ross Peddicord and Ross Peddicord,Staff Writer | October 12, 1993
Eight days after the Oct. 1 trigger date, Bob and Tom Manfuso have informed Laurel/Pimlico operator Joe De Francis that they are exercising their rights under a Russian Roulette clause in a stockholders agreement and are offering to sell him their shares in the two race tracks.The Manfusos said yesterday that they sent a certified letter to De Francis on Saturday.The brothers also said, in a separate letter, that they resigned their positions as officers and directors of Laurel and Pimlico.
NEWS
By Kris Antonelli and Kris Antonelli,SUN STAFF | May 30, 1997
A teen-age runaway believed to have shot herself to death a year ago, actually was killed by a friend during a game of Russian roulette, Baltimore County police said yesterday.Two teen-agers were being held in jail yesterday in the slaying of Brandy Lynn Noel, 16, a runaway struggling with family problems.The girl was staying temporarily with a family who lived in the 1600 block of Sollers Point Road when she was shot in the head May 24, 1996. The gun was apparently put in her right hand to make it look as if she killed herself, according to police and court records.
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