Advertisement
HomeCollectionsRussian Revolution
IN THE NEWS

Russian Revolution

FEATURED ARTICLES
FEATURES
By ANTERO PIETILA | December 23, 1990
The Russian Revolution.Richard Pipes.Knopf.946 pages. $40.The crisis in the Soviet Union is unfolding so fast now that any book-length discussion of Mikhail S. Gorbachev's perestroika attempt is doomed to be badly out of date by its publication date. In this situation a thoughtful newspaper reader will need a reliable guide that informs and fills gaps but is up to date. This book is it -- it tells us how the Soviet Union got into this mess.It is ironic that "The Russian Revolution," the second volume of a contemplated historical trilogy covering the last years of czarist rule and early years of communism, is likely to make its strongest impact not in this country but inside the Soviet Union.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Richard Eder and Richard Eder,Los Angeles Times | February 4, 2007
Surveillance Jonathan Raban Pantheon / 258 pages / $24 Cross Lincoln Steffens on the Russian Revolution ("I have seen the future and it works") with Pogo ("We have met the enemy and he is us"), and you pretty much come out at Jonathan Raban's new novel. "I have met the future and it's the enemy and it's us," in other words. This is the dystopian theme of Surveillance, a current that does not so much run beneath the fiction as flood it. The compass virtually pre-empts the ship, eclipsing such features of an ocean trip as sunlight on cobalt waves, storm clouds on black ones, salt air, flying fish, seasickness and the onboard affair.
Advertisement
FEATURES
By Vida Roberts and Vida Roberts,Staff Writer | April 2, 1993
All parties were winners in Ralph Lauren's revisionist interpretation of the Russian Revolution.Cossacks, grand duchesses, tweedy intellectuals, peasants anGypsies did a grand march in his fall collection.Most of the recurring trends of the season were evident in his presentation, but the master American designer had shaped them into beautiful clothes, instead of costumes. He cut the military look into a Cossack general's greatcoat. He dressed his dandies as sensitive intellectuals in pure white shirts and small velvet vests.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | February 22, 2003
Sergei Mikhailovich Eisenstein completed only seven films before dying at age 50 in 1948, but they were enough to make him one of the most revered and influential directors the world has ever seen. Evidence of his genius will be on display tonight at Shriver Hall on the campus of the Johns Hopkins University, with a 7:30 p.m. screening of October, his 1928 dramatization of the Bolshevik Revolution, loosely based on American journalist John Reed's book, Ten Days That Shook the World. The movie, being shown as part of Baltimore's Vivat!
NEWS
By GILBERT SANDLERE | January 14, 1992
THE RUSSIAN Revolution, and the Communist Party that both won and lost it, are history now. But the Marxist idea, nurtured by the revolution, caught fire around the world and helped to bring about what is now known as McCarthyism in the United States. That dreaded "ism" found its way to Baltimore via Washington, D.C., and Johns Hopkins University. Does anybody remember Owen Lattimore?On the evening of Feb. 9, 1950, against a background of communism marching across Europe and Asia, Sen. Joseph McCarthy of Wisconsin stood up at the McClure Hotel in Wheeling, W. Va., and said, "I have here in my hand a list of 205 names known to the secretary of state as being members of the Communist Party."
NEWS
August 21, 1991
How incredibly fitting, that in the end, after 70 years of botched rule in Russia, the Old Bolsheviks even botched their final effort to do what they've always done best -- rule by terror. The successors to Stalin, in their dying gasp, became the Gang That Couldn't Shoot Straight.At this early stage of the breathtaking events that are unfolding today in the Soviet Union, these observations seem safe:1. Mikhail Gorbachev, if and when he returns to power, will owe not only his position but probably his life as well to the courageous stand of his erstwhile nemesis, Boris Yeltsin.
NEWS
By Robin Miller | November 11, 1991
LOS ANGELES was once a minor-league haven for czarist Russian refugees. By the time I came along in the 1950s, their tales were old and had been told many times, but were still thrilling.One of the best storytellers among them was Nicolai, who owned a fruit stand at the old farmer's market on Wilshire Boulevard. When I was 5 or 6, my grandmother would leave me with Nicolai as she shopped at other stalls, and he'd tell me of the Russian revolution, of the crowds in the streets and the workers who deposed the czar.
NEWS
January 24, 1993
Sidney RapoportRetired accountantSidney Rapoport, a retired accountant and Jewish refugee from the Russian Revolution who participated in the invasion of Normandy in World War II, died Jan. 5 at his home in Columbia after suffering from cancer and a heart ailment. He was 77.Mr. Rapoport was an accountant who worked for 27 years for the Army and Air Force Exchange Service, first as an auditor in the service's European headquarters in Nuremberg, Germany, in the late 1940s.In the early 1970s, he worked for the service in a field office in southern Indiana, where he retired after a heart attack 2 1/2 years later.
NEWS
By GEORGE F. WILL | March 24, 1993
Washington. -- In London's Putney Vale Cemetery, eight mile south of Marx's grave in Highgate Cemetery, rest the remains of Alexander Kerensky, who might have spared Russia a 70-year secession from civilization. Boris Yelstin seems to understand the moral of Kerensky's failure.In July 1917, at a moment of extreme fluidity in the dissolution of the old regime, Kerensky became Russia's premier. Perhaps he would have been brushed aside anyway, but his cautious centrism, his insufficient radicalism, doomed him.He would not remove Russia from the war or boldly multiply property owners by redistributing land.
NEWS
By RAY JENKINS | September 1, 1991
Anyone with a speaking acquaintance with Russian history and literature can hardly escape a deep sense of foreboding these frenetic days that the old Russian proclivity for botching things monumentally will once more reassert itself.Look at the history of this century alone. Between 1914 and 1918 -- years which encompassed the First World War and the Russian Revolution -- 60 million Russians lost their lives. Between 1930 and 1940, another 20 million perished during the Stalinist purges. And between 1941 and 1945, 25 million more died during the Second World War. So within the memory of living people more than a 100 million Russians -- one out of four who have lived in this century -- died from war, terror and revolution.
NEWS
By Douglas Birch and Douglas Birch,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | November 11, 2002
MOSCOW - The Kremlin dismisses him as a terrorist and a bandit. But Shamil Basayev, who plotted the seizure of more than 800 hostages in a Moscow theater last month, represents more than just another gunman with a grudge. The guerrilla leader is the product of a fierce mountain culture hardened by two centuries of struggle against Russian rule. And he has proven himself one of Moscow's most skillful and determined foes. The 37-year-old warlord, thought to be hiding in Chechnya's snow-capped mountains, says the hostage seizure - which led to at least 169 deaths - was justified by the Russian military's record of attacks on Chechen civilians.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Scott Shane and Scott Shane,Sun Staff | October 31, 1999
Could life after communism have turned out better for Russia and its former Soviet neighbors? Mikhail Gorbachev insists that it could have. And things are so dismal today that his argument, tainted as it is by self-justification, is worth a fair hearing.In the eight years since Boris Yeltsin used the aftermath of the failed coup against Gorbachev to maneuver his rival from power, the Russian economy has shrunk steadily and natural riches have been spirited abroad. Wealth has been monopolized by a handful of unprincipled oligarchs while millions have slipped into destitution.
NEWS
By Joe Mathews and Joe Mathews,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 20, 1997
NEW YORK -- Every Tuesday at 2 p.m., a revolution from Russia arrives by Internet in Sam Chen's press room, a warehouse with the distinct smell of fresh blood, the result of its ,, location in Manhattan's meat-packing district.Chen is the Taiwanese-born godfather of another bloody business: New York City's immigrant-run, foreign language press. For two decades his company -- Expedi -- has printed more than half of New York's 100 or so ethnic papers, in languages from Creole to Arabic. But Chen says Moscow-based Argumenty I Fakty, the weekly that arrives in his office by Internet, is something entirely new.Argumenty I Fakty (Arguments and Facts)
FEATURES
By Vida Roberts and Vida Roberts,Staff Writer | April 2, 1993
All parties were winners in Ralph Lauren's revisionist interpretation of the Russian Revolution.Cossacks, grand duchesses, tweedy intellectuals, peasants anGypsies did a grand march in his fall collection.Most of the recurring trends of the season were evident in his presentation, but the master American designer had shaped them into beautiful clothes, instead of costumes. He cut the military look into a Cossack general's greatcoat. He dressed his dandies as sensitive intellectuals in pure white shirts and small velvet vests.
NEWS
By GEORGE F. WILL | March 24, 1993
Washington. -- In London's Putney Vale Cemetery, eight mile south of Marx's grave in Highgate Cemetery, rest the remains of Alexander Kerensky, who might have spared Russia a 70-year secession from civilization. Boris Yelstin seems to understand the moral of Kerensky's failure.In July 1917, at a moment of extreme fluidity in the dissolution of the old regime, Kerensky became Russia's premier. Perhaps he would have been brushed aside anyway, but his cautious centrism, his insufficient radicalism, doomed him.He would not remove Russia from the war or boldly multiply property owners by redistributing land.
NEWS
January 24, 1993
Sidney RapoportRetired accountantSidney Rapoport, a retired accountant and Jewish refugee from the Russian Revolution who participated in the invasion of Normandy in World War II, died Jan. 5 at his home in Columbia after suffering from cancer and a heart ailment. He was 77.Mr. Rapoport was an accountant who worked for 27 years for the Army and Air Force Exchange Service, first as an auditor in the service's European headquarters in Nuremberg, Germany, in the late 1940s.In the early 1970s, he worked for the service in a field office in southern Indiana, where he retired after a heart attack 2 1/2 years later.
NEWS
By Will Englund and Will Englund,Moscow Bureau | November 14, 1992
MOSCOW -- A Warner Bros. executive stopped at a sidewalk kiosk outside the Kievski train station here and picked up a videocassette of a Warner Bros. movie that won't even be released in the United States until December.And that was two months ago.That's when the executive, Gerhard Weber, knew that piracy of tapes had gotten out of hand here.Yesterday he was back in Moscow, part of a delegation of Western business executives who had come to preach the doctrine of copyright law."Piracy levels in this country are virtually 100 percent," said Eric Smith, executive director of a Washington organization that brings together film, music, publishing and software trade organizations.
NEWS
By Richard Eder and Richard Eder,Los Angeles Times | February 4, 2007
Surveillance Jonathan Raban Pantheon / 258 pages / $24 Cross Lincoln Steffens on the Russian Revolution ("I have seen the future and it works") with Pogo ("We have met the enemy and he is us"), and you pretty much come out at Jonathan Raban's new novel. "I have met the future and it's the enemy and it's us," in other words. This is the dystopian theme of Surveillance, a current that does not so much run beneath the fiction as flood it. The compass virtually pre-empts the ship, eclipsing such features of an ocean trip as sunlight on cobalt waves, storm clouds on black ones, salt air, flying fish, seasickness and the onboard affair.
FEATURES
By Joan Jacobson and Joan Jacobson,Staff Writer | January 7, 1993
Rudolf Nureyev's zealous mission to dance drove him on a frenzied 30-year tour of the world, changing how audiences saw ballet and how dancers performed it.The legendary Mr. Nureyev died yesterday in Paris at the age of 54, just two months after receiving his last standing ovation at the Paris Opera.His doctor, Michel Canesi would say only that Mr. Nureyev died of "cardiac complications" following a long, "devastating illness.Following Mr. Nureyev's wishes, I can't say any more."Previous press reports said the gaunt, Russian dancer suffered from the AIDS virus.
NEWS
By Will Englund and Will Englund,Moscow Bureau | November 14, 1992
MOSCOW -- A Warner Bros. executive stopped at a sidewalk kiosk outside the Kievski train station here and picked up a videocassette of a Warner Bros. movie that won't even be released in the United States until December.And that was two months ago.That's when the executive, Gerhard Weber, knew that piracy of tapes had gotten out of hand here.Yesterday he was back in Moscow, part of a delegation of Western business executives who had come to preach the doctrine of copyright law."Piracy levels in this country are virtually 100 percent," said Eric Smith, executive director of a Washington organization that brings together film, music, publishing and software trade organizations.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.