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By Ellen James Martin | November 8, 1991
Lauren Utkin speaks fluent Russian. The Baltimore woman is completing a graduate program in Soviet studies at Washington's Georgetown University. She's visited the Soviet Union many times. And she's married to a Russian biologist.Yet Ms. Utkin, 24, gets nervous thinking about risks that could await Russian Adventures, the business she's launching. Along with a joint-venture partner in St. Petersburg, she hopes to soon begin sending U.S. tourists to the Russian Republic."The whole legal structure in the Soviet Union is unstable," she said.
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NEWS
By Douglas Birch and Douglas Birch,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | July 17, 2005
NALCHIK, Russia - Dzhamed Tsakoyev knelt on the carpet and laid the paperwork out like tarot cards, as if shuffling medical and police reports might make sense of his son's brutal death. Last year, police in the southern Russian republic of Kabardino-Balkaria arrested Tsakoyev's son, Rasul, a cell phone dealer who was also a devout Muslim. Rasul Tsakoyev's captors allegedly shocked him with electric wires, put cigarettes out on his skin and beat him unconscious. They left him for dead on a trash heap.
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NEWS
By Jay Merwin and Jay Merwin,Evening Sun Staff | December 10, 1991
Baltimore's Ukrainians were cleaning up after a momentous celebration of Ukraine's new-found independence from the Soviet Union when they were startled by news that their homeland was joining a commonwealth with Byelorussia and the Russian republic."
NEWS
By Alex Rodriguez and Alex Rodriguez,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 23, 2003
SLEPTSOVSK, Russia - The Russian government will ask thousands of Chechens today to map the future of their small, strongly independent republic through a constitutional referendum. But Vakha Shokarov can't summon the will to vote. The body of his son, Murat, 31, turned up at a city morgue last month, three weeks after Russian authorities whisked him away in a raid. The body had been dismembered and blackened with a blowtorch. His other son, Vicit, 37, vanished after he asked police about Murat's disappearance.
NEWS
By Clara Germani and Clara Germani,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | January 16, 1996
MOSCOW -- As Russians watched television coverage of government helicopter gunships mercilessly pounding a tiny southern village with rockets all day yesterday, suspicions grew about whether the assault was calculated to save hostages held by Chechen rebels, or to save beleaguered President Boris N. Yeltsin's reputation.And if the long and messy Chechen war has offered any lessons, yesterday's government assault on the Chechen rebels certainly will not be the end of the separatist movement.
NEWS
June 14, 1991
Boris N. Yeltsin's landslide victory is a watershed event in the dismantling of the Soviet Communist system. Seventy-three years after Bolsheviks deposed Russia's standing government, voters have returned the Russian republic and Moscow and Leningrad city governments to non-Communist hands. They also want St. Petersburg, the pre-revolutionary name of Leningrad, restored.These expressions of popular will change the very dynamics of Soviet politics at a time when future power-sharing between the Kremlin and the republics is still to be defined.
NEWS
March 15, 1991
Watch out for Ukraine, Uzbekistan and Kirghizia in Sunday's Soviet elections. Instead of asking the question President Mikhail S. Gorbachev wants to ask -- should the Soviet Union be a "renewed federation of equal, sovereign republics?" -- those three states want their voters to decide whether they should remain part of the federation at all.A "no" vote could produce a chain reaction and unglue the empire the czars, Lenin and Stalin forged together. Even a lukewarm "yes" would be a setback to Mr. Gorbachev, who wanted a non-binding referendum to muster legitimacy for his efforts to keep the Soviet Union together.
NEWS
By David Conn and Ted Shelsby | August 20, 1991
Two far-reaching Maryland-related business ventures that could be worth up to $16 billion are among the potential casualties of the overthrow of Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev, state and private-sector officials said yesterday.The initial stage of a six-year food-processing deal worth as much as $6 billion to U.S. companies and foreign nations and up to 200,000 jobs to the Soviet Union was signed last month by U.S. and Russian Republic officials, but it now is in doubt because of the events unfolding in Moscow, Maryland officials ,, said yesterday.
NEWS
By Will Englund and Will Englund,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | September 24, 1999
MOSCOW -- Russia was on the verge of a second war in Chechnya yesterday after the air force bombed the airport in Grozny, capital of the breakaway republic.Frustrated in its attempts to wipe out Islamic rebels who have twice seized villages in neighboring Dagestan, Moscow seems intent on escalating the fighting and bringing it home to Chechnya.Military leaders said they were determined to avoid a repetition of the disastrous war of 1994-1996, which left as many as 80,000 dead and led to the virtual independence of the Caucasus republic.
NEWS
By Douglas Seay | November 6, 1990
TOMORROW, the Soviet Union will celebrate the 73rd anniversary of the Bolshevik Revolution.Standing, as they always do, atop Lenin's mausoleum in Moscow, the top-ranking Soviet leaders will have an appropriate vantage point. For despite the appearance of a celebration, they will be presiding over a funeral.Indeed, any Communist Party official attending should wear black, for the omens are unmistakable that the Soviet Union almost certainly will not live to see its 74th birthday, or even another summer.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | December 12, 1999
KAVKAZ CHECKPOINT, Russia -- A top commander of Russian forces in Chechnya said yesterday that the Russian military was determined to destroy the Islamic militants in Grozny by the end of the winter, signaling that while the Russians have backed off from threats to bombard the Chechen capital this weekend, they still seek an early and decisive victory over the rebels."
NEWS
By Will Englund and Will Englund,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | September 24, 1999
MOSCOW -- Russia was on the verge of a second war in Chechnya yesterday after the air force bombed the airport in Grozny, capital of the breakaway republic.Frustrated in its attempts to wipe out Islamic rebels who have twice seized villages in neighboring Dagestan, Moscow seems intent on escalating the fighting and bringing it home to Chechnya.Military leaders said they were determined to avoid a repetition of the disastrous war of 1994-1996, which left as many as 80,000 dead and led to the virtual independence of the Caucasus republic.
NEWS
By Kathy Lally and Kathy Lally,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | October 4, 1998
ELISTA, Russia -- Kirsan Ilyumzhinov roams his small domain like royalty, resplendent in a white Rolls Royce, his warrior-guards mounted behind him on a formidable Humvee, stirring clouds of dust as they race across the dry, empty steppe.Little wonder that he worships chess. The name of the game comes from the Persian word for king, and Ilyumzhinov luxuriates in the notion. He uses the Mongol word to describe himself: the khan of Kalmykia. His is a modest kingdom. He is president of the ethnic republic of Kalmykia, a region of 350,000 mostly poor shepherds and farmers in southern Russia.
NEWS
By Clara Germani and Clara Germani,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | January 16, 1996
MOSCOW -- As Russians watched television coverage of government helicopter gunships mercilessly pounding a tiny southern village with rockets all day yesterday, suspicions grew about whether the assault was calculated to save hostages held by Chechen rebels, or to save beleaguered President Boris N. Yeltsin's reputation.And if the long and messy Chechen war has offered any lessons, yesterday's government assault on the Chechen rebels certainly will not be the end of the separatist movement.
NEWS
By Georgie Anne Geyer | February 21, 1992
Karan, Tatarstan -- THIS IS the place where "Russia" now falls apart or stays together. This is the next act in the endless melodrama of the death of communism. This is . . . where? Well, let me back up a few steppes.Moscow -- the hated "center" or, as some of its former peoples colorfully call it, the "black hole" -- still considers Tatarstan to be an autonomous republic that is part of Russia. But Tatarstan, as declared unanimously by its own parliament on Aug. 30, 1990, says it is an independent state.
NEWS
By Jay Merwin and Jay Merwin,Evening Sun Staff | December 10, 1991
Baltimore's Ukrainians were cleaning up after a momentous celebration of Ukraine's new-found independence from the Soviet Union when they were startled by news that their homeland was joining a commonwealth with Byelorussia and the Russian republic."
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | December 12, 1999
KAVKAZ CHECKPOINT, Russia -- A top commander of Russian forces in Chechnya said yesterday that the Russian military was determined to destroy the Islamic militants in Grozny by the end of the winter, signaling that while the Russians have backed off from threats to bombard the Chechen capital this weekend, they still seek an early and decisive victory over the rebels."
NEWS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,Washington Bureau of The Sun | August 28, 1991
WASHINGTON -- Behind President Bush's caution in dealing with the rapidly shifting Soviet crisis lies a series of dangers and dilemmas involving security, territory and personalities, according to administration officials and regional experts.Question marks range from continuing confidence in Soviet nuclear safeguards to protection of ethnic minorities in a country where central control is fast giving way to local autonomy.Uncertainty pervades U.S. policy as events outpace analysis daily, making rapid realignment of the U.S. approach difficult.
BUSINESS
By Ellen James Martin | November 8, 1991
Lauren Utkin speaks fluent Russian. The Baltimore woman is completing a graduate program in Soviet studies at Washington's Georgetown University. She's visited the Soviet Union many times. And she's married to a Russian biologist.Yet Ms. Utkin, 24, gets nervous thinking about risks that could await Russian Adventures, the business she's launching. Along with a joint-venture partner in St. Petersburg, she hopes to soon begin sending U.S. tourists to the Russian Republic."The whole legal structure in the Soviet Union is unstable," she said.
NEWS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,Washington Bureau of The Sun | August 28, 1991
WASHINGTON -- Behind President Bush's caution in dealing with the rapidly shifting Soviet crisis lies a series of dangers and dilemmas involving security, territory and personalities, according to administration officials and regional experts.Question marks range from continuing confidence in Soviet nuclear safeguards to protection of ethnic minorities in a country where central control is fast giving way to local autonomy.Uncertainty pervades U.S. policy as events outpace analysis daily, making rapid realignment of the U.S. approach difficult.
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