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NEWS
By Clara Germani and Clara Germani,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | February 15, 1996
YEKATERINBURG, Russia -- When Boris N. Yeltsin left this city in the Urals for the Communist Party big time in Moscow, everyone here was delighted, so much did they admire him. They wanted to see him bludgeon the Soviet establishment the way he bludgeoned local bureaucrats into being honest and fair."
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FEATURES
March 20, 2003
March 20 1727: Physicist, mathematician and astronomer Sir Isaac Newton died in London. 1852: Harriet Beecher Stowe's influential novel about slavery, Uncle Tom's Cabin, was first published. 1976: Kidnapped newspaper heiress Patricia Hearst was convicted of armed robbery for her part in a San Francisco bank holdup. 1987: The Food and Drug Administration approved the sale of AZT, a drug shown to prolong the lives of some AIDS patients. 1995: In Tokyo, 12 people were killed, more than 5,500 others sickened when packages containing the poisonous gas sarin leaked on five separate subway trains.
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NEWS
March 21, 1998
A headline in yesterday's editions of The Sun misstated an action by Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin. As the article accurately said, he did not fire governors and mayors, but rather stripped them of their bodyguards.The Sun regrets the errors.Pub Date: 3/21/98
FEATURES
February 7, 2002
Today in history: Feb. 7 In 1812, author Charles Dickens was born in Portsmouth, England. In 1931, aviator Amelia Earhart married publisher George P. Putnam in Noank, Conn. In 1936, President Franklin Roosevelt authorized a flag for the office of the vice president. In 1943, the government announced that shoe rationing would go into effect, limiting consumers to buying three pairs per person for the remainder of the year. In 1944, during World War II, the Germans launched a counteroffensive at Anzio, Italy.
NEWS
August 25, 1991
At dawn last Monday, Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev's trusted advisers tried to topple him because they feared he was embarking on a course that would destroy the centralized power of the Communist Party.Within 63 hours, the coup was undone by demonstrations from simple, unarmed Russians who would stand for no more tyranny. Led by Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin, they stood their ground against tanks and soldiers.By the end of the week, Mr. Gorbachev was restored to his post but it was Mr. Yeltsin who had won the day as the Communist Party's 73-year hold on power was being dismantled.
NEWS
June 20, 1991
Russian President Boris Yeltsin is currently visiting the United States, where he is finding strong support in Congress for upgraded U.S. relations with the Soviet republics. President Bush, however, is seen as walking a fine line as he seeks to maintain good relations with Soviet President Mikhail Gorbachev, head of the central government.The Evening Sun wants to know what you think about Yeltsin, Gorbachev and U.S.-Soviet relations.To register your opinion, call SUNDIAL at 783-1800 (or 268-7736 in Anne Arundel County)
FEATURES
March 20, 2003
March 20 1727: Physicist, mathematician and astronomer Sir Isaac Newton died in London. 1852: Harriet Beecher Stowe's influential novel about slavery, Uncle Tom's Cabin, was first published. 1976: Kidnapped newspaper heiress Patricia Hearst was convicted of armed robbery for her part in a San Francisco bank holdup. 1987: The Food and Drug Administration approved the sale of AZT, a drug shown to prolong the lives of some AIDS patients. 1995: In Tokyo, 12 people were killed, more than 5,500 others sickened when packages containing the poisonous gas sarin leaked on five separate subway trains.
FEATURES
February 7, 2002
Today in history: Feb. 7 In 1812, author Charles Dickens was born in Portsmouth, England. In 1931, aviator Amelia Earhart married publisher George P. Putnam in Noank, Conn. In 1936, President Franklin Roosevelt authorized a flag for the office of the vice president. In 1943, the government announced that shoe rationing would go into effect, limiting consumers to buying three pairs per person for the remainder of the year. In 1944, during World War II, the Germans launched a counteroffensive at Anzio, Italy.
FEATURES
July 10, 1999
Today in history: July 10In 1850, Vice President Millard Fillmore assumed the presidency, following the death of President Taylor.In 1890, Wyoming became the 44th state.In 1919, President Wilson personally delivered the Treaty of Versailles to the Senate, and urged its ratification.In 1925, the official news agency of the Soviet Union, TASS, was established.In 1940, during World War II, the 114-day Battle of Britain began as Nazi forces began attacking southern England by air.In 1943, during World War II, U.S. and British forces invaded Sicily.
NEWS
June 1, 1998
RUSSIAN President Boris N. Yeltsin has temporarily stopped the ruble's free fall, but even a generous bailout from the West won't be sufficient to maintain the Russian currency for long. Unless the government begins to balance its budget and starts collecting taxes, no amount of external shoring up will prevent the ruble's devaluation.The Russian government has been financing its operations by selling bonds. Creditors have grown wary that the government does not have the resources to pay the interest or the principal on the bonds.
FEATURES
July 10, 1999
Today in history: July 10In 1850, Vice President Millard Fillmore assumed the presidency, following the death of President Taylor.In 1890, Wyoming became the 44th state.In 1919, President Wilson personally delivered the Treaty of Versailles to the Senate, and urged its ratification.In 1925, the official news agency of the Soviet Union, TASS, was established.In 1940, during World War II, the 114-day Battle of Britain began as Nazi forces began attacking southern England by air.In 1943, during World War II, U.S. and British forces invaded Sicily.
NEWS
June 1, 1998
RUSSIAN President Boris N. Yeltsin has temporarily stopped the ruble's free fall, but even a generous bailout from the West won't be sufficient to maintain the Russian currency for long. Unless the government begins to balance its budget and starts collecting taxes, no amount of external shoring up will prevent the ruble's devaluation.The Russian government has been financing its operations by selling bonds. Creditors have grown wary that the government does not have the resources to pay the interest or the principal on the bonds.
NEWS
March 21, 1998
A headline in yesterday's editions of The Sun misstated an action by Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin. As the article accurately said, he did not fire governors and mayors, but rather stripped them of their bodyguards.The Sun regrets the errors.Pub Date: 3/21/98
NEWS
By COX NEWS SERVICE | October 4, 1997
MOSCOW -- Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin issued a veiled threat yesterday that he would disband the Russian parliament for its failure to act on key economic reform proposals.Yeltsin used his weekly nationwide radio address to criticize parliament's lower house, the State Duma, which is controlled by Communists and hard-line nationalists opposed to the president's efforts to cut government spending and broaden rights to private land ownership."The patience of people, the patience of the president, is not unlimited," Yeltsin said.
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | March 19, 1997
WASHINGTON -- At a brief but important summit, President Clinton and Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin meet in the Finnish capital of Helsinki tomorrow and Friday for talks that may help determine whether the West and Russia will enter the next century as adversaries or friends.Even if no major agreements are reached, the two-day session on the Baltic coast will begin to chart a course for the long-term military and security relationship of the two former Cold War enemies.The leaders will try to bridge a deep divide over the planned expansion of the U. S.-dominated NATO alliance, end an impasse over reductions in their Cold War-era nuclear arsenals and defuse a growing disagreement over missile defenses.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,SUN STAFF | September 22, 1996
In 1967, Eugene Pottenger was lifting boxes of fruits and vegetables at his wholesale produce business in DeKalb, Ill., when he felt a strange tightening in his neck. It seemed like no muscle strain he had known.Pottenger, then 53, was about to gain an accidental place in the annals of medicine.Pottenger mentioned the tightening to his doctor. Initially, the physician thought the problem was trivial, but a treadmill test found signs that Pottenger's coronary arteries were dangerously clogged -- the possible precursor to a heart attack.
NEWS
By COX NEWS SERVICE | October 4, 1997
MOSCOW -- Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin issued a veiled threat yesterday that he would disband the Russian parliament for its failure to act on key economic reform proposals.Yeltsin used his weekly nationwide radio address to criticize parliament's lower house, the State Duma, which is controlled by Communists and hard-line nationalists opposed to the president's efforts to cut government spending and broaden rights to private land ownership."The patience of people, the patience of the president, is not unlimited," Yeltsin said.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | June 12, 1992
MOSCOW -- Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin said that he would soon issue decrees lifting some of the major barriers to privatization. But he declared he would not permit the West to dictate economic policy to Russia, even if this meant delays in Western aid.Mr. Yeltsin made the statements in an interview four days before he is to leave for a state visit to the United States in which money and arms will be the central issues.He spoke on the eve of the first anniversary of his election as Russia's president -- a day he has proclaimed a national holiday and Russian Independence Day.The combination of a Russian's native pride and Mr. Yeltsin's yearning to bring democracy and economic freedom to his country surfaced repeatedly in an 85-minute meeting with representatives of five foreign news organizations.
NEWS
By Clara Germani and Clara Germani,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | February 15, 1996
YEKATERINBURG, Russia -- When Boris N. Yeltsin left this city in the Urals for the Communist Party big time in Moscow, everyone here was delighted, so much did they admire him. They wanted to see him bludgeon the Soviet establishment the way he bludgeoned local bureaucrats into being honest and fair."
NEWS
January 5, 1995
If Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin had managed to crush the Muslim rebellion in the Caucasus Mountain enclave of Chechnya with dispatch, he would be hailed today for the success and decisiveness of his brutal action.But more than three weeks after blitzing into that region, Russian troops still seem hopelessly bogged down. Despite heavy, indiscriminate aerial bombing and artillery barrage, a ragtag army of descendants of ancient mountain people is making a mockery of the Russian Army, the top military brass and President Yeltsin himself.
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