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By Kathy Lally and Kathy Lally,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | June 5, 2000
MOSCOW - They showed the beginning of the official summit on the news last night - two presidents, each with the requisite entourage of advisers and translators and note-takers and secretaries of state, purposefully striding into the gilded and heavily embossed czarist splendor of a Kremlin hall, preparing to get nowhere on nuclear missile defense systems. The other summit started several hours later, after President Clinton complimented President Vladimir V. Putin on the clarity of their disagreement and said farewell.
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NEWS
By Jules Witcover | April 11, 2014
The report that protesters have declared two eastern Ukraine cities to be independent republics questions President Obama's assurance that there is no "military solution" to the crisis that began with Russian President Vladmir Putin's land grab of Crimea. "If Russia moves into eastern Ukraine, either overtly or covertly," White House press secretary Jay Carney said Monday, "this would be a very serious escalation. " But what does that mean? A State Department spokesperson said only that such a move "would result in additional costs" to Moscow.
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NEWS
By DAN BERGER | October 5, 1992
Don't ask again why they call him Magic.Before Ross got back in, it was just a two-way race. Now it is a two-way race.If they didn't fear the U.S. Mediterranean fleet before, they do now.Dr. Ben Carson repudiated his advertisement on the abortion law referendum, which is like Cal coming out against milk.The Russian people are told that capitalism is good for them by the same people who said that communism was, and accord it the same credibility.
NEWS
February 27, 2014
Regarding your reader who expressed disappointment over President Obama's lack of "engagement" in Ukraine, America must not forget the Cuban Missile Crisis, when the world came as close to Armageddon as hopefully we will ever get ( "Obama must not abandon Ukraine's democrats," Feb. 24). The primary reason for that crisis was the U.S.' refusal to tolerate under any circumstances Soviet military influence in a region we considered our own. We justified this by citing the 200-year-old Monroe Doctrine.
NEWS
August 21, 1991
How incredibly fitting, that in the end, after 70 years of botched rule in Russia, the Old Bolsheviks even botched their final effort to do what they've always done best -- rule by terror. The successors to Stalin, in their dying gasp, became the Gang That Couldn't Shoot Straight.At this early stage of the breathtaking events that are unfolding today in the Soviet Union, these observations seem safe:1. Mikhail Gorbachev, if and when he returns to power, will owe not only his position but probably his life as well to the courageous stand of his erstwhile nemesis, Boris Yeltsin.
NEWS
March 27, 1993
The idea of a constitution survived this week in Russia. So did President Boris Yeltsin. Absolutism, a great tradition in Russia, lost.Mr. Yeltsin did not get to scrap the Congress of People's Deputies and its creature, the Supreme Soviet. The Congress did not get to depose Mr. Yeltsin. (The word used was "impeach," but it did not mean accuse and try; it meant kick out.)On the surface, Mr. Yeltsin appears a winner. His legend as a heroic politician facing down an armed coup or hostile Congress is burnished.
NEWS
April 2, 1993
President Clinton put the issue forcefully -- "a strategic alliance with Russian reform" is vital to American national interests. He told the American Society of Newspaper Editors meeting at the U.S. Naval Academy in Annapolis that the struggle to build free societies in the former Soviet Union "presents the greatest security challenge for our generation," and "offers one of the greatest economic opportunities of our lifetime."Not an act of charity but an investment in our future. What American, hearing it put that way, could say no?
NEWS
By Donald M. Rothberg AP diplomatic writer | January 26, 1992
Not that long ago the Russians were the nuclear-armed enemy. "We almost hated them," recalls Jack Provost.But now Provost, like thousands of other volunteers and members of charitable groups around the country, is intent on feeding Russian people who need help to get through a hard winter."
NEWS
By Sherry Graham and Sherry Graham,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 21, 1996
A CENTENNIAL birthday is surely something worth noting in a big way.Springfield Hospital Center marked its 100th year Sunday afternoon with a celebration on the hospital grounds. A parade featured nearly 58 entries, from Baltimore, Carroll and Howard counties. They included marching bands, majorette corps, color guards, floats, clowns, 4-H clubs and Scout groups.Other festivities included demonstrations by the state police K-9 units, a dance troupe and karate exhibitions.The hospital auxiliary and the rehabilitation staff worked hard to provide a variety of food, plenty of games and entertainment for the whole family.
NEWS
April 5, 1993
In the 50 years since Franklin D. Roosevelt met Josef Stalin at Tehran, leaders of the United States and (Soviet) Russia have come together two dozen times to deal with the military and ideological confrontations of the Cold War. Moods varied from the menace of the Kennedy-Khrushchev face-off in Vienna to the no-nukes mysticism of the Reagan-Gorbachev seance at Reykjavik. But always, the numbers on the table concerned warheads and missile range and throw-weight and all the arcana of nuclear war gamesmanship.
NEWS
By Thomas M. Barrett | February 16, 2014
The Olympics have begun, and it's clear already that one sport is still flourishing - Russia bashing. Or more precisely, awkward American back flips over exactly how to depict Russia. Only a few days in, NBC committed factual errors, gross distortions and patronizing enthusiasms. During a fluff piece on the Trans-Siberian Railway, the tsar who initiated its construction was referred to as "Nicholas III. " There never was a Nicholas III; anyone with a passing familiarity with Russian history knows that Nicholas II was the last tsar.
NEWS
By David Horsey | August 20, 2013
Pandering to the Russian Orthodox Church and to the homophobia of a huge share of the Russian people, President Vladimir Putin's government has approved new laws that tighten the screws on gays and lesbians. While this may gain him political points at home, Mr. Putin has further darkened the image of his country internationally -- at least in the parts of the world where human rights are valued. In the United States, Europe and elsewhere, pro-gay activists are pushing a boycott of Russian vodka and discussing a boycott of the 2014 Winter Olympics set to be held in Sochi, Russia.
NEWS
May 10, 2005
PRESIDENT BUSH is hitting all the right notes on Russia. It's a welcome change from his first term. He was right to go to Moscow to attend the V-E Day events yesterday - despite the creepy Stalinization under way there and the refusal of the Russians to recognize the harm they brought to Eastern Europe in the wake of World War II. He was also right to visit Latvia and Georgia - despite the Russian accusations that the United States is meddling too much...
NEWS
May 13, 2004
THE BEHEADING of Nicholas Berg, and the anticipatory videotape image of five captors standing over him, provoke within us a deep and nearly instinctual response. This is so ugly and wrong we want to twist away from it. First the Abu Ghraib prison photos, now this - not that they are in any way equivalent, because they are not. They are each in their own world of darkness. They are connected, yes, but neither outrage justifies or mitigates or balances the other. Together, they are almost too much to grasp.
NEWS
July 8, 2000
THE PAST WEEK has been particularly lethal in Russia's attempt to reconquer secessionist Chechnya. At least 33 troops were killed in a series of suicide bomb attacks. The guerrillas' success has once again demonstrated that the war in the Caucasus mountains, despite Moscow's early victories, is far from over. Russians may have overwhelming conventional troop strength and technology, but the Islamic insurgents know the terrain and fight with passion. Journalists and analysts have described the war in Chechnya as Russia's Vietnam, just as Moscow's 10-year occupation of Afghanistan was also described.
NEWS
By Kathy Lally and Kathy Lally,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | June 5, 2000
MOSCOW - They showed the beginning of the official summit on the news last night - two presidents, each with the requisite entourage of advisers and translators and note-takers and secretaries of state, purposefully striding into the gilded and heavily embossed czarist splendor of a Kremlin hall, preparing to get nowhere on nuclear missile defense systems. The other summit started several hours later, after President Clinton complimented President Vladimir V. Putin on the clarity of their disagreement and said farewell.
NEWS
July 8, 2000
THE PAST WEEK has been particularly lethal in Russia's attempt to reconquer secessionist Chechnya. At least 33 troops were killed in a series of suicide bomb attacks. The guerrillas' success has once again demonstrated that the war in the Caucasus mountains, despite Moscow's early victories, is far from over. Russians may have overwhelming conventional troop strength and technology, but the Islamic insurgents know the terrain and fight with passion. Journalists and analysts have described the war in Chechnya as Russia's Vietnam, just as Moscow's 10-year occupation of Afghanistan was also described.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | September 20, 1999
MOSCOW -- In a tense standoff, Russian and Chechen forces confronted one another along their mutual border yesterday, as Russian Prime Minister Vladimir V. Putin told a national television audience that the nation's 1996 peace deal with Chechnya was a mistake.In heated language reminiscent of the kind used by Russian officials at the height of the 1994-1996 Russian war with the separatist republic, Putin said that Chechnya is a criminal state and that Russia must crush its bandit gangs decisively.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | September 20, 1999
MOSCOW -- In a tense standoff, Russian and Chechen forces confronted one another along their mutual border yesterday, as Russian Prime Minister Vladimir V. Putin told a national television audience that the nation's 1996 peace deal with Chechnya was a mistake.In heated language reminiscent of the kind used by Russian officials at the height of the 1994-1996 Russian war with the separatist republic, Putin said that Chechnya is a criminal state and that Russia must crush its bandit gangs decisively.
NEWS
By Will Englund and Will Englund,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | July 16, 1998
MOSCOW -- When they lower the bones of Nicholas II into an imperial vault in St. Petersburg tomorrow, solemnly laying to rest the czar whose murder symbolized Russia's most terrible century, Vladimir Kopytov won't care.Kopytov is a Ural Mountain coal miner who has other things to worry about -- he hasn't worked since January or been paid since September.Nadya Zernina won't care, either. She's a 20-year-old university student from Perm, and she'll be enjoying a chance to study abroad this summer in Oxford, England.
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