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By Douglas Birch and Douglas Birch,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | August 6, 2005
MOSCOW - Seven sailors aboard a miniature Russian submarine that sank off the Kamchatka Peninsula on Thursday were still trapped in the cold, dark waters of the North Pacific early today, as their air supply steadily dwindled. The stubby, red-and-white-striped Priz tangled its propeller in fishing nets during naval exercises and sank in 625 feet of water, a Russian navy spokesman said. The accident triggered an international rescue effort joined by Britain, Japan and the United States.
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NEWS
March 5, 2014
Whatever the outcome in Ukraine, I'll bet most Americans want us to keep hands off. I'm sorry for everyone in that beleaguered country, but dragging the United States into a military confrontation with Russia would be reckless ( "Obama, Kerry condemn Russian 'aggression' in Ukraine as U.S. readies aid," March 4). Right now, it looks like President Barack Obama is the only one standing up to President Vladimir Putin. Instead, I think we should "lead from behind" since the Ukraine conflict is in Europe's neighborhood, not ours.
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NEWS
August 19, 2000
THE RUSSIAN NAVY will struggle mightily to recover from the loss of the nuclear submarine Kursk, which sank in Arctic waters with 118 crew members aboard. The catastrophe was the worst in the history of that country's nuclear fleet. Even after the pain heals, the memory of the disaster may make Kremlin policy-makers hesitant to beef up its navy. In the post-Cold War rejuggling, high-maintenance navy has become increasingly expendable. The Kremlin has slashed its share of the military budget to 12 percent.
NEWS
By Douglas Birch and Douglas Birch,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | August 6, 2005
MOSCOW - Seven sailors aboard a miniature Russian submarine that sank off the Kamchatka Peninsula on Thursday were still trapped in the cold, dark waters of the North Pacific early today, as their air supply steadily dwindled. The stubby, red-and-white-striped Priz tangled its propeller in fishing nets during naval exercises and sank in 625 feet of water, a Russian navy spokesman said. The accident triggered an international rescue effort joined by Britain, Japan and the United States.
NEWS
By Will Englund and Will Englund,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | August 22, 2000
MOSCOW - Norwegian divers found the stranded submarine Kursk to be flooded throughout yesterday, and the Russian navy declared the entire 118-man crew dead, bringing to an end the drawn-out rescue drama that has left Russians in puzzlement and despair. The wreck of the nuclear submarine in the Barents Sea shook this country more than the far deadlier apartment house bombings a year ago, more than the war in Chechnya that followed, more than the explosion in a busy pedestrian underpass in Moscow two weeks ago. The navy repeatedly showed itself unable to come up with a consistent or satisfactory explanation as to what had happened or what was going on. The country's president, Vladimir V. Putin, showed a lack of political horse sense by staying away on vacation while the crisis was under way. The press, controlled by business tycoons who have recently turned against Putin, showed itself willing to take on the popular president.
NEWS
By Will Englund and Will Englund,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | August 21, 2000
MOSCOW - Three Norwegian divers opened the stubborn outer hatch of the stricken Russian submarine Kursk this morning, finally succeeding after a long day of little progress yesterday. They found the space below the hatch filled with water. Russian navy officials had said that would find a body of a sailor who had tried to make a desperate attempt at escape. But no one was there. Admiral Vyacheslav Popov, head of Russia's Northern Fleet, said this morning that the divers would go right to work on trying to open the inner hatch into the submarine.
NEWS
By Norman Polmar | August 23, 2000
WASHINGTON -- How could it have happened? The Kursk was one of the most modern submarines of the Russian fleet. A giant, 19,000-ton, 505-foot underwater missile cruiser, it was designed to attack U.S. aircraft carriers with long-range missiles. Except for the Russian Typhoon strategic missile submarines, the Kursk and its sister boats are the largest submarines ever built -- larger in volume than even the Trident missile submarines, the largest U.S. undersea craft. The Kursk was new, completed in 1995, and its crew was considered one of the best in the Navy.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | January 24, 2003
MOSCOW - A Russian journalist and environmental whistle-blower whose conviction sparked international protests was paroled yesterday after serving more than two-thirds of a four-year term. A military court had convicted Grigory Pasko of treason for attending a 1997 meeting of Russian naval commanders and taking notes, which the court ruled he had intended to pass to Japanese reporters. Pasko's backers say he was punished in reprisal for his reporting on environmental abuses by the Russian navy, including the dumping of radioactive waste into the sea. Pasko's imprisonment had been seen as part of a tightening of pressure against independent reporting in recent years.
NEWS
March 5, 2014
Whatever the outcome in Ukraine, I'll bet most Americans want us to keep hands off. I'm sorry for everyone in that beleaguered country, but dragging the United States into a military confrontation with Russia would be reckless ( "Obama, Kerry condemn Russian 'aggression' in Ukraine as U.S. readies aid," March 4). Right now, it looks like President Barack Obama is the only one standing up to President Vladimir Putin. Instead, I think we should "lead from behind" since the Ukraine conflict is in Europe's neighborhood, not ours.
NEWS
By Will Englund and Will Englund,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | November 22, 2000
SHCHERBINKA, Russia - The people who run this little city a few miles south of Moscow want to put it on the map and figure that John Paul Jones is just the man to do it for them. Here - across from the railroad tracks, next to the new church built by a philanthropic entrepreneur, not far from the Otis Elevator factory, and about 500 miles from the nearest salt water - Shcherbinka hopes to raise a memorial to the fiery hero of the American Revolution. John Paul Jones? The one who's buried at the Naval Academy in Annapolis?
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | January 24, 2003
MOSCOW - A Russian journalist and environmental whistle-blower whose conviction sparked international protests was paroled yesterday after serving more than two-thirds of a four-year term. A military court had convicted Grigory Pasko of treason for attending a 1997 meeting of Russian naval commanders and taking notes, which the court ruled he had intended to pass to Japanese reporters. Pasko's backers say he was punished in reprisal for his reporting on environmental abuses by the Russian navy, including the dumping of radioactive waste into the sea. Pasko's imprisonment had been seen as part of a tightening of pressure against independent reporting in recent years.
NEWS
By Will Englund and Will Englund,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | November 22, 2000
SHCHERBINKA, Russia - The people who run this little city a few miles south of Moscow want to put it on the map and figure that John Paul Jones is just the man to do it for them. Here - across from the railroad tracks, next to the new church built by a philanthropic entrepreneur, not far from the Otis Elevator factory, and about 500 miles from the nearest salt water - Shcherbinka hopes to raise a memorial to the fiery hero of the American Revolution. John Paul Jones? The one who's buried at the Naval Academy in Annapolis?
NEWS
September 16, 2000
Does a Kursk lurk in our own future? As a longtime student of Norman Polmar's writings, I was greatly interested in his comments regarding the Kursk tragedy ("American Navy missed chance to rescue sub," Opinion Commenatary, Aug. 23). However, I would ask Mr. Polmar and others interpreting the incident as an indicator of the dangerous state to which Russia's military has declined, to apply the Kursk's lessons closer to home. There is a Kursk in our own future. Since the end of the Cold War, our military budgets have shrunk considerably.
NEWS
By Norman Polmar | August 23, 2000
WASHINGTON -- How could it have happened? The Kursk was one of the most modern submarines of the Russian fleet. A giant, 19,000-ton, 505-foot underwater missile cruiser, it was designed to attack U.S. aircraft carriers with long-range missiles. Except for the Russian Typhoon strategic missile submarines, the Kursk and its sister boats are the largest submarines ever built -- larger in volume than even the Trident missile submarines, the largest U.S. undersea craft. The Kursk was new, completed in 1995, and its crew was considered one of the best in the Navy.
NEWS
By Will Englund and Will Englund,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | August 22, 2000
MOSCOW - Norwegian divers found the stranded submarine Kursk to be flooded throughout yesterday, and the Russian navy declared the entire 118-man crew dead, bringing to an end the drawn-out rescue drama that has left Russians in puzzlement and despair. The wreck of the nuclear submarine in the Barents Sea shook this country more than the far deadlier apartment house bombings a year ago, more than the war in Chechnya that followed, more than the explosion in a busy pedestrian underpass in Moscow two weeks ago. The navy repeatedly showed itself unable to come up with a consistent or satisfactory explanation as to what had happened or what was going on. The country's president, Vladimir V. Putin, showed a lack of political horse sense by staying away on vacation while the crisis was under way. The press, controlled by business tycoons who have recently turned against Putin, showed itself willing to take on the popular president.
NEWS
By Will Englund and Will Englund,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | August 21, 2000
MOSCOW - Three Norwegian divers opened the stubborn outer hatch of the stricken Russian submarine Kursk this morning, finally succeeding after a long day of little progress yesterday. They found the space below the hatch filled with water. Russian navy officials had said that would find a body of a sailor who had tried to make a desperate attempt at escape. But no one was there. Admiral Vyacheslav Popov, head of Russia's Northern Fleet, said this morning that the divers would go right to work on trying to open the inner hatch into the submarine.
NEWS
By Will Englund and Will Englund,Moscow Bureau | June 28, 1992
MOSCOW -- The empires cracks and dissolves, but the army goes on.Here, army life begins where it always has, in a dispiriting, dim building set in a gruesomely industrial district of southeast Moscow.Worn-out buses from all over the city pull up every morning, bringing in stoic young men, doing what's expected of them, their minds seemingly blank and definitely hung over.Soviet law said that every young man had to serve his nation. Now there is no Soviet law, and today it's a Russian army and a Russian navy -- and there's some question as to whether there actually exists a Russian law requiring service -- but still the draftees wearily show up.They don't know what awaits them.
NEWS
September 16, 2000
Does a Kursk lurk in our own future? As a longtime student of Norman Polmar's writings, I was greatly interested in his comments regarding the Kursk tragedy ("American Navy missed chance to rescue sub," Opinion Commenatary, Aug. 23). However, I would ask Mr. Polmar and others interpreting the incident as an indicator of the dangerous state to which Russia's military has declined, to apply the Kursk's lessons closer to home. There is a Kursk in our own future. Since the end of the Cold War, our military budgets have shrunk considerably.
NEWS
August 19, 2000
THE RUSSIAN NAVY will struggle mightily to recover from the loss of the nuclear submarine Kursk, which sank in Arctic waters with 118 crew members aboard. The catastrophe was the worst in the history of that country's nuclear fleet. Even after the pain heals, the memory of the disaster may make Kremlin policy-makers hesitant to beef up its navy. In the post-Cold War rejuggling, high-maintenance navy has become increasingly expendable. The Kremlin has slashed its share of the military budget to 12 percent.
NEWS
By Neal Thompson and Tom Bowman and Neal Thompson and Tom Bowman,SUN STAFF | December 1, 1999
A 40-year-old Navy cryptography expert, formerly based at the National Security Agency, has been arrested on espionage charges after admitting that he mailed a computer floppy disk containing U.S. secrets to Russian officials.News of the arrest followed reports in Russia and Europe that Moscow had arrested a U.S. diplomat at the embassy there and accused her of spying. U.S. officials declined to say whether there is a connection between the events.In the NSA case, Petty Officer 1st Class Daniel M. King, apparently despondent over a failing marriage and a stalled Navy career, confessed after failing a lie detector test during a routine security clearance review last summer.
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