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Russian Mafia

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NEWS
By Jonathan Power | October 14, 1997
VIENNA, Austria -- The fuss over Iran -- the major investment by the French oil company, Total, and the alleged indirect support of Russia for Iran's nuclear bomb program -- is taking our eyes off the real ball.It was the same three years ago when Central Intelligence Agency leaks about North Korea's bomb ambitions were part of an effort to steamroller President Clinton into ordering the bombing of North Korea's nuclear installations.The real issue in terms of imminent danger, both then and now, is the Russian mafia.
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NEWS
By Bruce Wallace and Bruce Wallace,LOS ANGELES TIMES | October 28, 2006
SEOUL, South Korea -- Much of the world may have dismissed him as a scientific charlatan, but discredited stem cell scientist Hwang Woo Suk is still not conceding a thing to his accusers. And those human stem cells he claimed to have cloned in 2005 that his former university later found to have been fabricated? They were human stem cells, Hwang insisted in Seoul's District Court this week, which is hearing charges that the scientist broke bioethics laws and embezzled more than $2 million from money donated to his research program.
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SPORTS
By Milton Kent and Milton Kent,SUN SPORTS MEDIA CRITIC | November 2, 1996
BRISTOL, Conn. -- If you watched the special first-hour simulcast of ESPNEWS last night on ESPN and are thinking of putting the heat on the local cable operator to add the channel on the basis of what you saw, hold on a minute.What the country saw in that breathless first hour, with special interviews, a major investigative story and appearances from the likes of Chris Berman, Dick Vitale, NBA Commissioner David Stern and New York Yankees shortstop Derek Jeter, bears little similarity to what the new channel will look like.
NEWS
By Thomas L. Friedman | October 2, 2001
WASHINGTON - The day after the World Trade Center bombings, an Egyptian TV show called and asked me to explain the impact on Americans. I scanned my brain for an analogy and finally said: Imagine how Egyptians would feel if three suicide bombers rammed airplanes into the Pyramids, with thousands of people inside. New York's twin towers were our Pyramids, built with glass and steel rather than stones, but Pyramids to American enterprise and free markets, and someone has destroyed them.
NEWS
By Newsday | July 3, 1995
WASHINGTON -- The CIA has stepped up its counternarcotics operations abroad and assisted Colombian authorities last month in tracking down a kingpin of the notorious Cali cartel, according to senior U.S. intelligence officials.Providing a rare glimpse of the Central Intelligence Agency's recent clandestine efforts at slowing the flow of drugs into the United States, the officials acknowledged that the agency had penetrated several drug cartels and boosted its caseload from a couple of operations annually in the 1980s to "more than a dozen" each year in the 1990s.
NEWS
By Thomas L. Friedman | October 2, 2001
WASHINGTON - The day after the World Trade Center bombings, an Egyptian TV show called and asked me to explain the impact on Americans. I scanned my brain for an analogy and finally said: Imagine how Egyptians would feel if three suicide bombers rammed airplanes into the Pyramids, with thousands of people inside. New York's twin towers were our Pyramids, built with glass and steel rather than stones, but Pyramids to American enterprise and free markets, and someone has destroyed them.
SPORTS
By SANDRA McKEE | December 28, 1993
When Washington Capitals left wing Dimitri Khristich went home to Kiev, Ukraine, last summer, he was warned to be on guard for extortionists."I had heard Alexei Khristich of the L.A. Kings had had some trouble," said Khristich, who has been told by general manager David Poile to let the Capitals know if he has any trouble. "But no one knew I was in Kiev, and I had no trouble. When I saw Khristich here after our game with Los Angeles, he said it had happened, but it was over."Khristich told the Los Angeles Times on Sunday that he was targeted for extortion last summer in his homeland.
NEWS
By Bruce Wallace and Bruce Wallace,LOS ANGELES TIMES | October 28, 2006
SEOUL, South Korea -- Much of the world may have dismissed him as a scientific charlatan, but discredited stem cell scientist Hwang Woo Suk is still not conceding a thing to his accusers. And those human stem cells he claimed to have cloned in 2005 that his former university later found to have been fabricated? They were human stem cells, Hwang insisted in Seoul's District Court this week, which is hearing charges that the scientist broke bioethics laws and embezzled more than $2 million from money donated to his research program.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Craig Eisendrath and By Craig Eisendrath,Special to the Sun | April 11, 1999
"Bella Tuscany: The Sweet Life in Italy," by Frances Mayes. Broadway Books. 286 pages. $25.A year and a half after her best-selling "Under the Tuscan Sun" (Broadway Books, 1997, 697,000 books in print), Frances Mayes continues her love affair with Italy. Now in her ninth summer in Cortona, a hilltown in rural Tuscany, the poet and professor of creative writing at San Francisco State University practices her craft in rich, sensual descriptions of gourmet meals, fine wines, exquisitely planned gardens, crumbling walls, ancient churches, and the bluest skies in the world.
NEWS
By Sarah Koenig and Sarah Koenig,SUN STAFF | December 11, 2000
NEW YORK - Open an issue of the nation's oldest foreign-language newspaper, and you find articles about strokes, diagrams of intestines and ads for anti-aging pills. Novoye Russkoye Slovo, the Russian-language daily first published in 1910, knows its core audience: elderly immigrants who follow news in Brooklyn, Kiev and Tel Aviv and whose health could be better. Recently, though, the revered paper has begun courting these loyal readers' grandchildren. Tucked between the health pages of a recent issue were an article about the hottest band from Novosibirsk, a column titled "How to Make Sex More Fun" (one suggestion: scatter the bed with crackers)
NEWS
By Sarah Koenig and Sarah Koenig,SUN STAFF | December 11, 2000
NEW YORK - Open an issue of the nation's oldest foreign-language newspaper, and you find articles about strokes, diagrams of intestines and ads for anti-aging pills. Novoye Russkoye Slovo, the Russian-language daily first published in 1910, knows its core audience: elderly immigrants who follow news in Brooklyn, Kiev and Tel Aviv and whose health could be better. Recently, though, the revered paper has begun courting these loyal readers' grandchildren. Tucked between the health pages of a recent issue were an article about the hottest band from Novosibirsk, a column titled "How to Make Sex More Fun" (one suggestion: scatter the bed with crackers)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Craig Eisendrath and By Craig Eisendrath,Special to the Sun | April 11, 1999
"Bella Tuscany: The Sweet Life in Italy," by Frances Mayes. Broadway Books. 286 pages. $25.A year and a half after her best-selling "Under the Tuscan Sun" (Broadway Books, 1997, 697,000 books in print), Frances Mayes continues her love affair with Italy. Now in her ninth summer in Cortona, a hilltown in rural Tuscany, the poet and professor of creative writing at San Francisco State University practices her craft in rich, sensual descriptions of gourmet meals, fine wines, exquisitely planned gardens, crumbling walls, ancient churches, and the bluest skies in the world.
NEWS
By Jonathan Power | October 14, 1997
VIENNA, Austria -- The fuss over Iran -- the major investment by the French oil company, Total, and the alleged indirect support of Russia for Iran's nuclear bomb program -- is taking our eyes off the real ball.It was the same three years ago when Central Intelligence Agency leaks about North Korea's bomb ambitions were part of an effort to steamroller President Clinton into ordering the bombing of North Korea's nuclear installations.The real issue in terms of imminent danger, both then and now, is the Russian mafia.
SPORTS
By Milton Kent and Milton Kent,SUN SPORTS MEDIA CRITIC | November 2, 1996
BRISTOL, Conn. -- If you watched the special first-hour simulcast of ESPNEWS last night on ESPN and are thinking of putting the heat on the local cable operator to add the channel on the basis of what you saw, hold on a minute.What the country saw in that breathless first hour, with special interviews, a major investigative story and appearances from the likes of Chris Berman, Dick Vitale, NBA Commissioner David Stern and New York Yankees shortstop Derek Jeter, bears little similarity to what the new channel will look like.
NEWS
By Newsday | July 3, 1995
WASHINGTON -- The CIA has stepped up its counternarcotics operations abroad and assisted Colombian authorities last month in tracking down a kingpin of the notorious Cali cartel, according to senior U.S. intelligence officials.Providing a rare glimpse of the Central Intelligence Agency's recent clandestine efforts at slowing the flow of drugs into the United States, the officials acknowledged that the agency had penetrated several drug cartels and boosted its caseload from a couple of operations annually in the 1980s to "more than a dozen" each year in the 1990s.
NEWS
By Georgie Anne Geyer | August 11, 1994
St. Petersburg, Russia -- FOUR YEARS ago, in Moscow, the well-informed U.S. ambassador Jack Matlock talked to me about the future of this ancient and troubled state. The talk soon focused on the question of "free rubles" and racketeers."The excess currency is all in the wrong hands," he said. "It's in the hands of the gangs who are already extorting the small businesses. Polls show that support is growing for private property, but the way the privatization is going, they're selling the country out to the crooks."
NEWS
By Georgie Anne Geyer | August 11, 1994
St. Petersburg, Russia -- FOUR YEARS ago, in Moscow, the well-informed U.S. ambassador Jack Matlock talked to me about the future of this ancient and troubled state. The talk soon focused on the question of "free rubles" and racketeers."The excess currency is all in the wrong hands," he said. "It's in the hands of the gangs who are already extorting the small businesses. Polls show that support is growing for private property, but the way the privatization is going, they're selling the country out to the crooks."
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | September 21, 2007
Can Saturday Night Live bring back Dan Aykroyd and Steve Martin to do a "wild and crazy guys" parody of Eastern Promises? With Vincent Cassel (French) and Viggo Mortensen (Danish-American) playing Russian mafia pals in London, the film blitzes the audience with hilarious self-conscious brio and wildly clashing accents. Eastern Promises (Focus) Starring Viggo Mortensen, Naomi Watts, Vincent Cassel, Armin Mueller-Stahl. Directed by David Cronenberg. Rated R. Time 96 minutes.
SPORTS
By SANDRA McKEE | December 28, 1993
When Washington Capitals left wing Dimitri Khristich went home to Kiev, Ukraine, last summer, he was warned to be on guard for extortionists."I had heard Alexei Khristich of the L.A. Kings had had some trouble," said Khristich, who has been told by general manager David Poile to let the Capitals know if he has any trouble. "But no one knew I was in Kiev, and I had no trouble. When I saw Khristich here after our game with Los Angeles, he said it had happened, but it was over."Khristich told the Los Angeles Times on Sunday that he was targeted for extortion last summer in his homeland.
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