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By Douglas Birch and Douglas Birch,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | August 8, 2004
MOSCOW - He is the scholarly bad boy of Russian crime novelists. And he seems proud of the mischief that he has made. Russian writers have long been honored as wise men and secular prophets, but by pioneering literary detective fiction here, Grigory Chkhartishvili has overturned some traditions of Russia's literary world. "The whole project has a touch of anarchism in it, definitely," says the author, whose playful, teasing manner hides some very serious views. Chkhartishvili - who writes under the pen name Boris Akunin - is best known for a series of 11 thrillers set in late 19th-century Russia, each featuring the aristocratic detective Erast Fandorin.
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NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | March 26, 2012
Norman Henley, a retired Russian-language and world literature teacher and academic editor, died of congestive heart failure at the Charlestown Retirement Community in Catonsville. He was 96 and had earlier lived in Remington and Charles Village. Born in Auburndale, Mass., he earned a bachelor of arts degree at Boston University. He then studied at Andover-Newton Theological School and the Pacific School of Religion in Berkeley, Calif. While a student in Boston, he worked as a hospital orderly and assisted in the care of the injured in the 1942 Cocoanut Grove nightclub fire.
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NEWS
By Stephen Margulies | June 5, 1994
Scandal! Russian literature -- despite its long-winded heroism through sordid centuries of tyranny -- is as much known for scandal as for idealism. Gogol scandalized his progressive admirers when he published "correspondence" seemingly supporting the czar. Osip Mandelstam scandalized Soviet writers when he slapped a well-established official Soviet novelist. The revolutionary poet Mayakovsky was a shouting, strutting, garish scandal in and of himself.For Russians, Alexander Pushkin is not only the Shakespeare of Russia, he is also a combination of Jefferson and St. Francis.
NEWS
By Douglas Birch and Douglas Birch,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | August 8, 2004
MOSCOW - He is the scholarly bad boy of Russian crime novelists. And he seems proud of the mischief that he has made. Russian writers have long been honored as wise men and secular prophets, but by pioneering literary detective fiction here, Grigory Chkhartishvili has overturned some traditions of Russia's literary world. "The whole project has a touch of anarchism in it, definitely," says the author, whose playful, teasing manner hides some very serious views. Chkhartishvili - who writes under the pen name Boris Akunin - is best known for a series of 11 thrillers set in late 19th-century Russia, each featuring the aristocratic detective Erast Fandorin.
NEWS
By Douglas Birch and Douglas Birch,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | December 9, 2002
MOSCOW - When the novelist and short story writer Viktor Yerofeyev dared to publish an anthology of unauthorized literary works in 1979, Soviet authorities accused him of producing "pornography." He was then barred from publishing a word of his writing for eight years. Now, at the age of 55, Yerofeyev, an author who mixes the philosophical and the erotic, is once again the target of a moral crusade. The author is being harassed not by dour agents of the KGB but by a nationwide association of students known as Moving Together, who revere the country's president, Vladimir V. Putin - a dour former agent of the KGB. Like the Communist Party's guardians of public morals, Moving Together finds Yerofeyev's sardonic view of Russian society offensive to the point of being obscene.
NEWS
By Anne Whitehouse | July 14, 1991
THE TATTERED CLOAKAND OTHER NOVELS.Nina Berberova; translatedby Marian Schwartz.Knopf.306 pages. $21.These six fictions by Nina Berberova, a Russian writer now in her 91st year, are delicate and unsentimental tales of Russian emigre life, set mostly in Paris in the period between the two world wars. Her characters are victims or survivors, uprooted by revolution and war. All are nourished on bitterness, despair and loss. For these men and women, love is an indulgence, a luxury they cannot afford, or else it is a lost happiness existing only in the past, or a torment that will lead to destruction.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | March 26, 2012
Norman Henley, a retired Russian-language and world literature teacher and academic editor, died of congestive heart failure at the Charlestown Retirement Community in Catonsville. He was 96 and had earlier lived in Remington and Charles Village. Born in Auburndale, Mass., he earned a bachelor of arts degree at Boston University. He then studied at Andover-Newton Theological School and the Pacific School of Religion in Berkeley, Calif. While a student in Boston, he worked as a hospital orderly and assisted in the care of the injured in the 1942 Cocoanut Grove nightclub fire.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | August 2, 1999
Judith Gevantman, a former Baltimorean and vice president of a New York bond-rating firm, died of ovarian cancer Friday at Sinai Hospital. She was 50 and lived in Brooklyn, N.Y.Born in Baltimore, Ms. Gevantman was the daughter of Rabbi Chaim Gevantman, founder of Suburban Orthodox Congregation in Pikesville, and Charlotte Selma Gevantman. She graduated from Pikesville High School and earned a bachelor's degree in Russian and Russian literature from Goucher College, and a master's degree in Russian from New York University.
FEATURES
By Karol V. Menzie and Karol V. Menzie,Sun Staff Writer | April 27, 1994
A cookbook celebrating the fresh, flavorful, richly ethnic cuisine of Florida by Steve Raichlen has won a first place in the Julia Child Cookbook Awards for 1993."
NEWS
July 27, 2007
Here is Alexander Solzhenitsyn, the author of The Gulag Archipelago, the man who more than any other made the world understand the cruelty and senselessness of the Soviet prison camp system and, by extension, of the Soviet Union itself. Here is Mr. Solzhenitsyn, a former prisoner of the gulag, an exile in Vermont for many years, more recently a refusenik by choice when offered prizes by Mikhail S. Gorbachev and Boris N. Yeltsin - here he is accepting an award in June from President Vladimir V. Putin, whose career began in the organization that imprisoned the truth-seeking writer.
NEWS
By Douglas Birch and Douglas Birch,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | December 9, 2002
MOSCOW - When the novelist and short story writer Viktor Yerofeyev dared to publish an anthology of unauthorized literary works in 1979, Soviet authorities accused him of producing "pornography." He was then barred from publishing a word of his writing for eight years. Now, at the age of 55, Yerofeyev, an author who mixes the philosophical and the erotic, is once again the target of a moral crusade. The author is being harassed not by dour agents of the KGB but by a nationwide association of students known as Moving Together, who revere the country's president, Vladimir V. Putin - a dour former agent of the KGB. Like the Communist Party's guardians of public morals, Moving Together finds Yerofeyev's sardonic view of Russian society offensive to the point of being obscene.
NEWS
By Stephen Margulies | June 5, 1994
Scandal! Russian literature -- despite its long-winded heroism through sordid centuries of tyranny -- is as much known for scandal as for idealism. Gogol scandalized his progressive admirers when he published "correspondence" seemingly supporting the czar. Osip Mandelstam scandalized Soviet writers when he slapped a well-established official Soviet novelist. The revolutionary poet Mayakovsky was a shouting, strutting, garish scandal in and of himself.For Russians, Alexander Pushkin is not only the Shakespeare of Russia, he is also a combination of Jefferson and St. Francis.
NEWS
By Anne Whitehouse | July 14, 1991
THE TATTERED CLOAKAND OTHER NOVELS.Nina Berberova; translatedby Marian Schwartz.Knopf.306 pages. $21.These six fictions by Nina Berberova, a Russian writer now in her 91st year, are delicate and unsentimental tales of Russian emigre life, set mostly in Paris in the period between the two world wars. Her characters are victims or survivors, uprooted by revolution and war. All are nourished on bitterness, despair and loss. For these men and women, love is an indulgence, a luxury they cannot afford, or else it is a lost happiness existing only in the past, or a torment that will lead to destruction.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Pakenham | December 30, 2001
Kosmos, photographs by Adam Bartos, essay by Svetlana Boym (Princeton Architectural Press, 176 pages, $40). This is a cosmological coffee table book. Mainly, it is 94 astonishingly fine color photographs, all taken between June 1995 and April 1999 at various points in Russia, all having to do with the space program there. Many are at the Baikonur cosmodrome in the Kazakhstan desert, a primary research and launch site of the old Soviet Union's immense space flight efforts. All were taken by Bartos, a distinguished architectural and journalistic photographer from New York.
NEWS
By MICHAEL PAKENHAM | June 2, 1996
The Russians are writhing around in real democracy these days, for the first time in all their history. Messy business, that. Messier even than getting out of the colonizing trade, which the naughty old Soviet Union did with zeal and rapaciousness unmatched by the Conquistadors and the English combined, and from which Russia now has almost (don't cry for me, Chechnya) managed to extricate itself.So evidence pours in that there is a New Russia. Or, if not evidence, at least indications that a fresh national culture can rise from the shards of the steel shackles and straitjackets of centuries of czarist tyranny and socialist totalitarianism.
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