Advertisement
HomeCollectionsRussian Leaders
IN THE NEWS

Russian Leaders

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Hal Piper and Hal Piper,SUN STAFF | September 13, 2000
American presidents (and presidential candidates) come with families. Beaming wives and well-scrubbed children are a feature of every campaign. Laura Bush spoke up for her husband at the Republican convention, and Tipper Gore got a famous kiss from hers. At least since Eleanor Roosevelt, American political family members have been visible personalities. When a critic panned Margaret Truman's singing, father Harry threatened to punch him in the nose. What a contrast to Russia, where the families of leaders are rarely seen and almost never heard.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Nilay Saiya | April 7, 2014
The White House has responded to Russian actions in Crimea by taking a number of steps against Moscow: It has ramped up sanctions, verbally denounced the Kremlin's flouting of international law, effectively kicked Russia out of the G8 and given rhetorical support to Ukraine's new government. Such measures, however, are likely to deepen and prolong the crisis, not resolve it. The conventional view in Washington is that Russian President Vladimir Putin is a belligerent authoritarian intent upon expanding Russia's borders and confronting the West.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Alexander Artem Sakharov | November 29, 2006
LOS ANGELES -- Twenty-five years ago, a Reagan administration official asked my opinion on whether America was facing a clear and present danger from Russia. I said no. Despite the heated rhetoric on both sides, the Russians never intended to initiate an attack on the West, their strategic objective being to split Europe from the U.S. On the other hand, their fear of being attacked was countered, even in the face of President Ronald Reagan's hostility, by their faith in America's common sense.
NEWS
March 3, 2014
The seizure of the Crimea region of southern Ukraine by Russian troops over the weekend has created the most serious crisis in Europe since Moscow's 2008 incursion into Georgia, which led to the effective dismemberment and annexation of parts of that former Soviet republic. President Barack Obama was right to warn Russian president Vladimir Putin that his country will pay a price for attempting a similar territorial grab in Ukraine, but in order to make that threat credible he must use all the diplomatic tools at his disposal to convince America's European allies to speak with one voice in condemning Russia's dangerous military adventurism and flagrant violation of international norms while avoiding an escalation of the crisis that could lead to armed conflict.
NEWS
By Paul West and Jonathan Weisman and Paul West and Jonathan Weisman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | May 24, 2000
WASHINGTON - With President Clinton heading to Moscow soon for arms talks with Russian leaders, Texas Gov. George W. Bush warned yesterday that no new nuclear arms deal might be better than one "that ties the hands of the next president and prevents America from defending itself." Bush's warning was aimed at preventing Clinton from making any agreement that might hinder U.S. efforts to deploy an anti-missile defense system. It was also a rare intrusion by a presidential nominee-to-be into high-level summitry.
NEWS
By Clara Germani and Clara Germani,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | August 25, 1996
MOSCOW -- The 20-month war in the breakaway republic of Chechnya has fueled increasing cynicism among Russians about their young democracy and its leaders.And up to a point, the national shame of the war recalls American views of Vietnam a generation ago, minus the idealism that converted anti-war cynicism into public activism.Natasha Cherkashin, for example, considers herself a pacifist. The performance artist says she's sick of the gore on the nightly news, and she's disgusted with Russian leaders who led the nation into the bloody dispute over a piece of ground long inhabited by Chechens.
NEWS
By DANIEL SNEIDER | April 4, 1993
Moscow.-- Accompaning the meeting of American and Russian presidents this weekend in Vancouver, British Columbia, there is much ballyhoo about the transformation from cold-war enmity to partnership. Indeed, on issues ranging from the Yugoslav crisis to the global economy, Russia under Boris Yeltsin now talks the same language as the West.But as President Clinton will soon discover, Mr. Yeltsin's political troubles make it very difficult for him to deliver on promises of cooperation.Both foreign policy and economic reform are increasingly being held hostage to domestic political pressures, particularly in the weeks leading up to an April 25 referendum on Mr. Yeltsin's rule, observers say."
NEWS
By Megan K. Stack and Megan K. Stack,LOS ANGELES TIMES | December 11, 2007
MOSCOW -- President Vladimir V. Putin yesterday backed First Deputy Prime Minister Dmitry Medvedev as a candidate to succeed him, abruptly snatching away the shroud of secrecy that has obscured the hunt for a new Russian leader. The country has been waiting anxiously for Putin, who finishes his second term in office next year, to anoint a successor. Conventional wisdom in Moscow has long taken it for granted that whomever Putin tapped would be elected president. Still, Putin's surprise endorsement startled many analysts.
NEWS
By Clara Germani and Clara Germani,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | October 28, 1995
MOSCOW -- President Boris N. Yeltsin will be in the hospital for at least another week and under closer medical care for the next month -- a time of intense political maneuvering in Russia and expected important international developments, especially in Bosnia.The Russian leader was hospitalized Thursday after his second apparent heart attack in four months.Kremlin officials announced yesterday the recuperation period that will guarantee that Mr. Yeltsin will be out of commission politically during the hottest part of the campaign season leading up to the parliamentary elections Dec. 17.After tests yesterday, doctors found that Mr. Yeltsin was suffering from an "unstable blood supply to the heart," said Sergei Medvedev, the president's press secretary.
NEWS
By Kathy Lally and Will Englund and Kathy Lally and Will Englund,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | August 29, 1998
MOSCOW -- A diminished Boris N. Yeltsin appeared on television last night trying to reassure a fearful nation, but his vague words and hesitant replies made him look out of touch and even unconcerned about Russia's desperate financial situation.He was assertive on only one question: his determination to stay in power until the end of his term."I will not resign," Yeltsin said in the interview, which had been taped earlier in the day. "I will work the full term given to me by the constitution.
NEWS
By Megan K. Stack and Megan K. Stack,LOS ANGELES TIMES | December 11, 2007
MOSCOW -- President Vladimir V. Putin yesterday backed First Deputy Prime Minister Dmitry Medvedev as a candidate to succeed him, abruptly snatching away the shroud of secrecy that has obscured the hunt for a new Russian leader. The country has been waiting anxiously for Putin, who finishes his second term in office next year, to anoint a successor. Conventional wisdom in Moscow has long taken it for granted that whomever Putin tapped would be elected president. Still, Putin's surprise endorsement startled many analysts.
NEWS
By David Holley and David Holley,LOS ANGELES TIMES | October 19, 2007
MOSCOW -- President Vladimir V. Putin, rebutting suspicions that he intends to formally retain power beyond the end of his second term, said yesterday that he wants to hand over the constitutional powers of the presidency to a successor. Putin's comment was made to reporters after a three-hour televised question-and-answer session with citizens, during which Putin reaffirmed that he will step down next spring. Putin indicated this month that he might consider becoming prime minister after leaving the presidency.
NEWS
By Borzou Daragahi and Borzou Daragahi,LOS ANGELES TIMES | October 17, 2007
TEHRAN, Iran -- Russian President Vladimir V. Putin, appearing side by side with his Iranian counterpart at a five-nation summit here yesterday, made a powerful show of support for America's regional arch-enemy, drawing the line against any attack on Iran and reaffirming Iran's right to civilian use of nuclear energy. While Putin stopped short of unconditional support of the Iranian regime, the tenor of his remarks appeared at odds with earlier suggestions from the Bush administration that Putin might take a more pro-Western stance.
NEWS
By Alexander Artem Sakharov | November 29, 2006
LOS ANGELES -- Twenty-five years ago, a Reagan administration official asked my opinion on whether America was facing a clear and present danger from Russia. I said no. Despite the heated rhetoric on both sides, the Russians never intended to initiate an attack on the West, their strategic objective being to split Europe from the U.S. On the other hand, their fear of being attacked was countered, even in the face of President Ronald Reagan's hostility, by their faith in America's common sense.
NEWS
By DAVID HOLLEY and DAVID HOLLEY,LOS ANGELES TIMES | May 11, 2006
MOSCOW -- President Vladimir V. Putin, in a blunt response to U.S. criticism of his domestic and foreign policies, declared yesterday that Russia will boost its military strength to ensure its ability to resist foreign pressure. In an annual address to parliament, Putin said new nuclear and high-precision weapons will enable his country to maintain a strategic balance with the United States, which he compared to a wolf - the arch-villain of Russian fairy tales - doing as it pleases in the world.
NEWS
By Douglas Birch and Douglas Birch,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | June 19, 2004
MOSCOW - The White House's assertion that the war in Iraq is part of a global struggle against terrorism won support yesterday from one of the leading foreign critics of the war, Russian President Vladimir V. Putin. Putin said Russian security agencies had repeatedly warned the White House after Sept. 11, 2001, that Saddam Hussein was planning "terrorist attacks" against targets both outside and inside the United States. "This information was passed through channels to American colleagues," he told reporters in Astana, the capital of the Central Asian state of Kazakstan.
NEWS
By John Daniszewski and John Daniszewski,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 26, 2002
MOSCOW -- Twenty-eight guerrillas laid down their arms yesterday in a move hailed by authorities as a sign that the situation in Chechnya is improving. But the killing of a pro-Russian party leader and the deaths of at least four Russians in 24 hours indicated it is not. Unidentified gunmen shot and killed the head of a pro-Kremlin party in the Chechen capital, Grozny, and two Russian policemen died in a clash with rebels in a nearby village, a Chechen government official said. Two other Russians died in other parts of the republic, spokesmen said.
NEWS
By Will Englund and Will Englund,Moscow Bureau of The Sun | November 2, 1991
MOSCOW -- Boris N. Yeltsin yesterday won the power he had been seeking to cast off Russia's old economic moorings in hopes that this country can somehow obtain buoyancy and ride out the coming storm.The Russian legislature gave him a free hand to reshape the economy, and the Russian president said he already has a decree drawn up that will free prices from state control.Mr. Yeltsin did not say when he would issue the decree, but the black market value of the ruble fell more than 50 percent yesterday in response to the news, from about 2 1/2 cents to a reported 1.1 cents.
NEWS
By William Wheeler and William Wheeler,SUN STAFF | April 16, 2004
Belarus native Slava Liberman offers some advice to the choral students gathered before him. "Lean on one another like a drunk leans on a fence," he says. "You must sing together like one person." His charges smile and nod in understanding. They are familiar with his colorful teaching style. For the past seven years, Liberman, a 56-year-old custodian for the Howard County school system, has been the leader and the inspiration of the Russian Chorus at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County.
NEWS
By Douglas M. Birch and Douglas M. Birch,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | March 13, 2004
MOSCOW - A voter from Siberia phoned President Vladimir V. Putin's Moscow campaign in the waning hours of the presidential contest here with a simple query. What would Putin do if he wins a second term? Good question. Perhaps because he feels assured of re-election, Putin hasn't bothered to set out his agenda. The campaign volunteer who answered the phone chided the caller for worrying about such trivial matters. "The main thing is not to declare plans, but to take real action," Vladimir P. Petin, a 67-year-old retired Moscow housing official, declared.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.