Advertisement
HomeCollectionsRussian Law
IN THE NEWS

Russian Law

FEATURED ARTICLES
FEATURES
By Michael Gold and The Baltimore Sun | August 18, 2013
Let's start with facts: Two members of the Russian women's 4x400-meter relay team, Kseniya Ryzhova and Tatyana Firova, kissed on the podium after their team won gold Saturday at the World Athletics Championship in Moscow. The smooch sparked a huge response, with many on Twitter and in several media outlets (especially Spanish-language ones, judging by my search last night) framing it as a protest against Russia's "gay propaganda" law. It may have been a stand of solidarity with the LGBT community.
ARTICLES BY DATE
FEATURES
By Michael Gold and The Baltimore Sun | September 26, 2013
In news as infuriating as it is unsurprising, International Olympic Committee officials said Thursday they were "fully satisfied" that a Russian law barring gay propaganda doesn't violate the Olympic charter's anti-discrimination language, the Washington Post reports . To repeat: A law engineered under the auspices of preventing gay and lesbian individuals from indoctrinating the youth (I'm reading between the lines here) both in person and through the media is apparently consistent with the Olympic Charter's language on discrimination.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Kim Murphy and Kim Murphy,LOS ANGELES TIMES | June 29, 2004
MOSCOW - Seven Russians who were returned to their homeland for investigation and detention after being held by U.S. authorities in Guantanamo Bay prison have been released, Russian prosecutors confirmed yesterday. In an action that apparently confounded U.S. officials, who were given no advance notice, the seven men accused of having been Taliban supporters in Afghanistan were released from a pretrial detention center in the North Caucasus region and allowed to return to their homes. "The case against them has been closed," said Natalya Vishnyakova, spokeswoman for the prosecutor general's office.
FEATURES
By Michael Gold and The Baltimore Sun | August 18, 2013
Let's start with facts: Two members of the Russian women's 4x400-meter relay team, Kseniya Ryzhova and Tatyana Firova, kissed on the podium after their team won gold Saturday at the World Athletics Championship in Moscow. The smooch sparked a huge response, with many on Twitter and in several media outlets (especially Spanish-language ones, judging by my search last night) framing it as a protest against Russia's "gay propaganda" law. It may have been a stand of solidarity with the LGBT community.
FEATURES
By Michael Gold and The Baltimore Sun | August 14, 2013
After Nick Symmonds won a silver medal at the World Athletics Championships in Moscow, the American distance runner became the first foreign athlete to openly condemn Russia's anti-gay law on Russian soil. And so far, for what it's worth, he hasn't been incarcerated. On Tuesday, Symmonds took second in the 800-meter final and dedicated his finish to LGBT friends in America, according to Russian news outlet R-Sport . "As much as I can speak out about it, I believe that all humans deserve equality as however God made them," he said to R-Sport.
NEWS
By Douglas Birch and Douglas Birch,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | July 8, 2004
MOSCOW - The man once described by American prosecutors as the chief of the Russian mob in the United States will walk out of a Pennsylvania prison in a week and head home after almost a decade behind bars. What happens next will be a test of how far Russia has come since the early 1990s, when organized crime bosses controlled much of the economy. It could also show the strength, or limits, of the links between U.S. and Russian law enforcement agencies forged after the Sept. 11 attacks.
FEATURES
By Michael Gold and The Baltimore Sun | July 27, 2013
As concern grows over how Russia's anti-gay laws might affect the upcoming winter Olympics, NBC Sports executive Mark Lazarus told members of the press that the network will "address those issues as they are relevant at the time of the Games, as has always been done by NBC's coverage. " Given NBC's near-invisible coverage of China's human rights issues were in Beijing in 2008, don't consider me reassured. Especially since Lazarus later said that NBC would cover the Russian law if it is "impacting any part of the Olympic games," a scenario that seems unlikely unless Russian authorities head into the Olympic Village and start imprisoning LGBT athletes.
FEATURES
By Michael Gold and The Baltimore Sun | August 13, 2013
Likely sensing that uproar over Russia's anti-gay law isn't going away, FIFA says it has asked Russia for "clarification and more details" about the country's law ahead of the 2018 World Cup being held there, the Associated Press reports . Smart move, given how the International Olympic Committee has yet to receive a definitive answer from Russian officials about how the law will be enforced at the Sochi Winter Olympics in February. In a statement, FIFA says it has "zero tolerance against discrimination.
FEATURES
By Michael Gold and The Baltimore Sun | July 18, 2013
After mounting concern about how Russia's anti-gay law would affect athletes headed to next year's Winter Olympics in Sochi, the International Olympic Committee has finally released a statement saying it will "work to ensure" no discrimination against LGBT participants. "The International Olympic Committee is clear that sport is a human right and should be available to all regardless of race, sex or sexual orientation," the statement reads. The organization also says it will make sure "the Games can take place without discrimination against athletes, officials, spectators and the media.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | December 27, 2012
To Heather and Aaron Whaley, they're already parents to a 4-year-old girl living in a Russian orphanage off the Sea of Japan. The Frederick couple have never met the child, but they've given her a name — Addie. They've hung pictures of her in a pink dress and white sandals in their house and dreamed of the day they'll throw their arms around her for the first time and bring her home — a moment that now may never come. The Whaleys, like untold numbers of families across the United States, are waiting to see whether Russian President Vladimir Putin decides to block adoptions between the two countries.
FEATURES
By Michael Gold and The Baltimore Sun | August 14, 2013
After Nick Symmonds won a silver medal at the World Athletics Championships in Moscow, the American distance runner became the first foreign athlete to openly condemn Russia's anti-gay law on Russian soil. And so far, for what it's worth, he hasn't been incarcerated. On Tuesday, Symmonds took second in the 800-meter final and dedicated his finish to LGBT friends in America, according to Russian news outlet R-Sport . "As much as I can speak out about it, I believe that all humans deserve equality as however God made them," he said to R-Sport.
FEATURES
By Michael Gold and The Baltimore Sun | August 13, 2013
Likely sensing that uproar over Russia's anti-gay law isn't going away, FIFA says it has asked Russia for "clarification and more details" about the country's law ahead of the 2018 World Cup being held there, the Associated Press reports . Smart move, given how the International Olympic Committee has yet to receive a definitive answer from Russian officials about how the law will be enforced at the Sochi Winter Olympics in February. In a statement, FIFA says it has "zero tolerance against discrimination.
FEATURES
By Michael Gold and The Baltimore Sun | July 27, 2013
As concern grows over how Russia's anti-gay laws might affect the upcoming winter Olympics, NBC Sports executive Mark Lazarus told members of the press that the network will "address those issues as they are relevant at the time of the Games, as has always been done by NBC's coverage. " Given NBC's near-invisible coverage of China's human rights issues were in Beijing in 2008, don't consider me reassured. Especially since Lazarus later said that NBC would cover the Russian law if it is "impacting any part of the Olympic games," a scenario that seems unlikely unless Russian authorities head into the Olympic Village and start imprisoning LGBT athletes.
FEATURES
By Michael Gold and The Baltimore Sun | July 18, 2013
After mounting concern about how Russia's anti-gay law would affect athletes headed to next year's Winter Olympics in Sochi, the International Olympic Committee has finally released a statement saying it will "work to ensure" no discrimination against LGBT participants. "The International Olympic Committee is clear that sport is a human right and should be available to all regardless of race, sex or sexual orientation," the statement reads. The organization also says it will make sure "the Games can take place without discrimination against athletes, officials, spectators and the media.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | December 27, 2012
To Heather and Aaron Whaley, they're already parents to a 4-year-old girl living in a Russian orphanage off the Sea of Japan. The Frederick couple have never met the child, but they've given her a name — Addie. They've hung pictures of her in a pink dress and white sandals in their house and dreamed of the day they'll throw their arms around her for the first time and bring her home — a moment that now may never come. The Whaleys, like untold numbers of families across the United States, are waiting to see whether Russian President Vladimir Putin decides to block adoptions between the two countries.
NEWS
By Douglas Birch and Douglas Birch,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | July 8, 2004
MOSCOW - The man once described by American prosecutors as the chief of the Russian mob in the United States will walk out of a Pennsylvania prison in a week and head home after almost a decade behind bars. What happens next will be a test of how far Russia has come since the early 1990s, when organized crime bosses controlled much of the economy. It could also show the strength, or limits, of the links between U.S. and Russian law enforcement agencies forged after the Sept. 11 attacks.
FEATURES
By Michael Gold and The Baltimore Sun | September 26, 2013
In news as infuriating as it is unsurprising, International Olympic Committee officials said Thursday they were "fully satisfied" that a Russian law barring gay propaganda doesn't violate the Olympic charter's anti-discrimination language, the Washington Post reports . To repeat: A law engineered under the auspices of preventing gay and lesbian individuals from indoctrinating the youth (I'm reading between the lines here) both in person and through the media is apparently consistent with the Olympic Charter's language on discrimination.
NEWS
By Kathy Lally and Kathy Lally,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | June 14, 1998
MOSCOW -- Traveling 5,000 miles from Baltimore by airplane and overnight train into the unknown, their luggage disappearing just long enough to provoke anxiety, Mary Lou Kenney and David Bolton arrived in the Russian city of Ulyanovsk to find their new baby daughter covered with bright green spots.The orphanage staff received them warmly and provided immediate reassurance. Nine-month-old Anna had a perfectly normal case of chicken pox, and the eruptions had been painted with an antiseptic routinely swathed over children here.
NEWS
By Kim Murphy and Kim Murphy,LOS ANGELES TIMES | June 29, 2004
MOSCOW - Seven Russians who were returned to their homeland for investigation and detention after being held by U.S. authorities in Guantanamo Bay prison have been released, Russian prosecutors confirmed yesterday. In an action that apparently confounded U.S. officials, who were given no advance notice, the seven men accused of having been Taliban supporters in Afghanistan were released from a pretrial detention center in the North Caucasus region and allowed to return to their homes. "The case against them has been closed," said Natalya Vishnyakova, spokeswoman for the prosecutor general's office.
NEWS
By Kathy Lally and Kathy Lally,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | June 14, 1998
MOSCOW -- Traveling 5,000 miles from Baltimore by airplane and overnight train into the unknown, their luggage disappearing just long enough to provoke anxiety, Mary Lou Kenney and David Bolton arrived in the Russian city of Ulyanovsk to find their new baby daughter covered with bright green spots.The orphanage staff received them warmly and provided immediate reassurance. Nine-month-old Anna had a perfectly normal case of chicken pox, and the eruptions had been painted with an antiseptic routinely swathed over children here.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.