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By Chicago Tribune | October 6, 1992
MOSCOW -- They make some Russians angry. They leave others confused. And they cause Americans to smile, or wonder why.They're the odd-sounding English names affixed to streetside kiosks all over town."
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,fred.rasmussen@baltsun.com | October 7, 2008
Joseph Glus, a World War II Navy veteran who later became the first Russian language teacher in Baltimore County public schools, died Wednesday of cancer at Keswick Multi-Care Center. The longtime Charles Village resident was 84. Mr. Glus, the son of immigrants from the Carpathian Mountains, was born and raised in McKeesport, Pa., in a bilingual household. He was a 1942 graduate of McKeesport High School and enlisted in the Navy in 1944. He served as a signalman aboard naval vessels in the Pacific.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,fred.rasmussen@baltsun.com | October 7, 2008
Joseph Glus, a World War II Navy veteran who later became the first Russian language teacher in Baltimore County public schools, died Wednesday of cancer at Keswick Multi-Care Center. The longtime Charles Village resident was 84. Mr. Glus, the son of immigrants from the Carpathian Mountains, was born and raised in McKeesport, Pa., in a bilingual household. He was a 1942 graduate of McKeesport High School and enlisted in the Navy in 1944. He served as a signalman aboard naval vessels in the Pacific.
NEWS
July 5, 2007
Russians want Russian to make a comeback. They're tired of Americans who speak only English, and they're offended by Poles and Estonians who choose not to speak Russian. They want their language to get some respect, and the government has gone so far as to make 2007 the official Year of the Russian Language (the news of which has only just now reached our offices). Boy oh boy. Russian is a beautiful and nuanced and devilish language. It sometimes bears a passing resemblance to headlinese, because it dispenses with articles (the and a)
NEWS
By Erika Niedowski and Erika Niedowski,Sun Foreign Reporter | May 12, 2007
NARVA, Estonia -- In this quiet Estonian city on a wide river separating the small Baltic nation from its mammoth Russian neighbor, the official state language, in practical terms, is also a foreign one. One hardly seems to need Estonian in Narva, where the majority of residents are ethnic Russians and where ordering a taxi, getting medicine at the pharmacy, even instruction in school, are done in Russian. The use of Estonian is so limited here that many have a similarly limited ability to speak it. That, the Estonian government says, is the problem.
NEWS
By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,Sun Staff Writer | August 22, 1995
Twice a month, an accountant, a filmmaker, a computer programmer, a student and a driving instructor put aside their usual work and gather in a Pikesville-area apartment to spend the weekend reading, typing, editing and debating.Ashtrays overflow. Plates of food are devoured. And then, another issue of the fledgling Russian-language newspaper Kaskad (Cascade in English) is ready for print.Paul Pickman, who started the biweekly paper in July, says the five volunteer staff members produce the paper to keep alive their heritage and as an intellectual challenge.
NEWS
By Will Englund and Will Englund,Moscow Bureau of The Sun | August 7, 1991
MOSCOW -- Russia is turning to the people it once scorned -- the millions of emigrants who now live around the world -- for help in restoring the finest traditions of Russian culture."
NEWS
By Robert Lee and Robert Lee,Staff writer | August 22, 1991
Three midshipmen and a Russian language specialist, all crowded around a satellite receiver at the U.S. Naval Academy, were among the first Americans to learn that the coup in the Soviet Union had failed yesterday.Ludmila A. Pruner, a Russian emigre with a doctorate in linguistics, could barely contain her excitement as she translated the8 a.m. (4 p.m. Moscow time) "First Channel" newscast received live via satellite in Annapolis."It's over for the hard-liners! Look at him (the newscaster)
NEWS
By Clara Germani and Clara Germani,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | March 5, 1997
MOSCOW -- In the old days, shop signs here meant what they said.If a sign said "moloko," or milk, that's exactly what the store sold, nothing more, nothing less.Then came the post-Soviet capitalist boom in goods and services. The fallout was a thicket of foreign-language signs to describe concepts or styles modern Russia had never heard of.For certain Russians -- mostly the young and the hip -- the now nearly ubiquitous English words "supermarket," "mini-market," "drugstore," "pub," and "shop" are a splash of capitalistic cachet.
NEWS
July 5, 2007
Russians want Russian to make a comeback. They're tired of Americans who speak only English, and they're offended by Poles and Estonians who choose not to speak Russian. They want their language to get some respect, and the government has gone so far as to make 2007 the official Year of the Russian Language (the news of which has only just now reached our offices). Boy oh boy. Russian is a beautiful and nuanced and devilish language. It sometimes bears a passing resemblance to headlinese, because it dispenses with articles (the and a)
NEWS
By Erika Niedowski and Erika Niedowski,Sun Foreign Reporter | May 12, 2007
NARVA, Estonia -- In this quiet Estonian city on a wide river separating the small Baltic nation from its mammoth Russian neighbor, the official state language, in practical terms, is also a foreign one. One hardly seems to need Estonian in Narva, where the majority of residents are ethnic Russians and where ordering a taxi, getting medicine at the pharmacy, even instruction in school, are done in Russian. The use of Estonian is so limited here that many have a similarly limited ability to speak it. That, the Estonian government says, is the problem.
NEWS
By Douglas Birch and Douglas Birch,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | December 25, 2004
ODESSA, Ukraine - Voters will return to the polls here tomorrow in a presidential election contest that has split Ukraine along ethnic and cultural lines, and increased tensions between Russia and its old Cold War rivals. In their choice for president, Ukrainians have been tugged toward integration into Europe by one candidate and toward a tighter embrace of Russia by the other. Whatever the outcome of the vote, the contest could influence the political course of other former Soviet states.
NEWS
By Kathy Lally and Kathy Lally,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | March 4, 1998
MOSCOW -- The Russian language is so emphatically phonetic that if you ask someone to spell his name, he'll pronounce it slowly and distinctly. Ask again -- how do you spell it? -- and he'll pronounce it again, perhaps shouting this time because, if you haven't understood, you're obviously hard of hearing.Russian words sound just like they're spelled. While English afflicts its speakers with rule-breaking words like "would" and "might," Russian follows its rules so devoutly that words like "obrushivshuyusya" (it means collapsed)
NEWS
By Clara Germani and Clara Germani,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | March 5, 1997
MOSCOW -- In the old days, shop signs here meant what they said.If a sign said "moloko," or milk, that's exactly what the store sold, nothing more, nothing less.Then came the post-Soviet capitalist boom in goods and services. The fallout was a thicket of foreign-language signs to describe concepts or styles modern Russia had never heard of.For certain Russians -- mostly the young and the hip -- the now nearly ubiquitous English words "supermarket," "mini-market," "drugstore," "pub," and "shop" are a splash of capitalistic cachet.
NEWS
By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,Sun Staff Writer | August 22, 1995
Twice a month, an accountant, a filmmaker, a computer programmer, a student and a driving instructor put aside their usual work and gather in a Pikesville-area apartment to spend the weekend reading, typing, editing and debating.Ashtrays overflow. Plates of food are devoured. And then, another issue of the fledgling Russian-language newspaper Kaskad (Cascade in English) is ready for print.Paul Pickman, who started the biweekly paper in July, says the five volunteer staff members produce the paper to keep alive their heritage and as an intellectual challenge.
NEWS
By Chicago Tribune | October 6, 1992
MOSCOW -- They make some Russians angry. They leave others confused. And they cause Americans to smile, or wonder why.They're the odd-sounding English names affixed to streetside kiosks all over town."
NEWS
By Mark Bomster and Mark Bomster,Evening Sun Staff | March 22, 1991
For three years, some ambitious Baltimore public high school students have wrestled with the Russian language -- and now comes the nagrada, or "reward."Tomorrow, nine students from three schools board a plane for Moscow and the start of a three-week visit that will include two weeks of classes in Leningrad.In November a similar group of Soviet students will visit Baltimore, staying with local families and getting a first-hand glimpse of American public education.The exchange is part of an effort by the Abell Foundation to promote instruction in languages that few American students study.
NEWS
By Douglas Birch and Douglas Birch,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | December 25, 2004
ODESSA, Ukraine - Voters will return to the polls here tomorrow in a presidential election contest that has split Ukraine along ethnic and cultural lines, and increased tensions between Russia and its old Cold War rivals. In their choice for president, Ukrainians have been tugged toward integration into Europe by one candidate and toward a tighter embrace of Russia by the other. Whatever the outcome of the vote, the contest could influence the political course of other former Soviet states.
NEWS
By Robert Lee and Robert Lee,Staff writer | August 22, 1991
Three midshipmen and a Russian language specialist, all crowded around a satellite receiver at the U.S. Naval Academy, were among the first Americans to learn that the coup in the Soviet Union had failed yesterday.Ludmila A. Pruner, a Russian emigre with a doctorate in linguistics, could barely contain her excitement as she translated the8 a.m. (4 p.m. Moscow time) "First Channel" newscast received live via satellite in Annapolis."It's over for the hard-liners! Look at him (the newscaster)
NEWS
By Will Englund and Will Englund,Moscow Bureau of The Sun | August 7, 1991
MOSCOW -- Russia is turning to the people it once scorned -- the millions of emigrants who now live around the world -- for help in restoring the finest traditions of Russian culture."
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