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NEWS
By Reported by Frank P. L. Somerville | May 26, 1994
About 50 Russian Jews, who fought for the Soviet Union during World War II, are scheduled to take part for the first time in Memorial Day services of Maryland's Jewish War Veterans group at 1 p.m. Sunday in Owings Mills.The participation of the former Soviet soldiers, now residents of the Baltimore area, is planned as part of the annual ceremonies sponsored by the veterans' group at the War Memorial on the grounds of the Jewish Community Center, 3506 Gwynnbrook Ave. The public is invited.
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NEWS
By Douglas Birch and Douglas Birch,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | June 29, 2005
MOSCOW - When Rabbi Zinovy L. Kogan arrived at the Moscow city prosecutor's office recently, investigators grilled him for two hours about an allegedly incendiary text published by his religious organization. The suspect work? A Russian translation of a 19th-century book of rules governing Jewish life. By printing thousands of copies of Kitzur Shulhan Arukh and distributing them through Jewish religious schools, Kogan had angered Russian nationalists. One filed a formal complaint last year with the prosecutor general, claiming the book incited religious hatred against people of other faiths.
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NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | October 8, 1995
JERUSALEM -- When they were still in the Soviet Union dreaming of going to Israel, Soviet Jews used to ask: "What do you call a Soviet symphony orchestra after it returns from an engagement in Israel?" Answer: "A string quartet."When the big post-Communist wave arrived in Israel a few years ago, the new joke was: "A remarkable change has been observed among Israeli street cleaners. Two years ago they spoke Arabic. Since then, they have all learned Russian and acquired a higher education." After a few years in Israel, the Russian Jews told of placing an ad in a Moscow newspaper: "Soviet Jews!
NEWS
By Tanika White and Tanika White,SUN STAFF | October 5, 2003
When Yury Ronzhes arrived in the United States from his home in Krivoy Rog, Ukraine, he was proud of his Jewish heritage, but he knew nothing about the history, traditions or customs of his own religion. Since meeting Rabbi Velvel Belinsky - a Russian-speaking spiritual leader who specializes in helping Russian Jews learn more about Judaism - Ronzhes has taken Jewish-related classes and is happy to be attending Yom Kippur services with his wife and mother-in-law. Millions of Jews around the world will usher in Yom Kippur - the Day of Atonement - with Kol Nidre services at sundown today, starting 25 hours of fasting, prayer and repentance.
NEWS
By Douglas Birch and Douglas Birch,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | June 29, 2005
MOSCOW - When Rabbi Zinovy L. Kogan arrived at the Moscow city prosecutor's office recently, investigators grilled him for two hours about an allegedly incendiary text published by his religious organization. The suspect work? A Russian translation of a 19th-century book of rules governing Jewish life. By printing thousands of copies of Kitzur Shulhan Arukh and distributing them through Jewish religious schools, Kogan had angered Russian nationalists. One filed a formal complaint last year with the prosecutor general, claiming the book incited religious hatred against people of other faiths.
NEWS
By John Rivera and John Rivera,SUN STAFF | October 1, 1997
In a Maryland section article yesterday about Beth Isaac Adath Israel Congregation, the last name of Mark Wartzman was misspelled in a photo caption.The Sun regrets the error.The shofar, a ram's horn blown at the start of the Jewish High Holy Days in a call to repentance, will sound once more this year at Beth Isaac Adath Israel Congregation.Last year, the leadership of this Baltimore County synagogue with an aging and dwindling membership decided to close, either to relocate or merge with another synagogue.
NEWS
By Tanika White and Tanika White,SUN STAFF | October 5, 2003
When Yury Ronzhes arrived in the United States from his home in Krivoy Rog, Ukraine, he was proud of his Jewish heritage, but he knew nothing about the history, traditions or customs of his own religion. Since meeting Rabbi Velvel Belinsky - a Russian-speaking spiritual leader who specializes in helping Russian Jews learn more about Judaism - Ronzhes has taken Jewish-related classes and is happy to be attending Yom Kippur services with his wife and mother-in-law. Millions of Jews around the world will usher in Yom Kippur - the Day of Atonement - with Kol Nidre services at sundown today, starting 25 hours of fasting, prayer and repentance.
NEWS
By Joan Jacobson and Joan Jacobson,SUN STAFF | November 4, 1996
Dimitri and Olga Kargman opened the Baltimore area's first "Russian pharmacy" in March with a built-in clientele of immigrant Russian Jews looking for herbal remedies and prescription drugs with instructions written in their native language.They quickly forged a relationship with a Russian doctor, Victoria V. Tsinberg, who sent patients from her Northwest Baltimore office to the couple's new Health-Rite Pharmacy in Pikesville.But after a little more than a month, say the Kargmans, Dr. Tsinberg stopped sending prescriptions their way, routing them instead to another new "Russian pharmacy" called Five Star.
NEWS
By FROM STAFF REPORTS | February 28, 2001
In Baltimore City Arundel man, 65, dies after truck runs over him A 65-year-old Anne Arundel County man, who was repairing the brakes on his tractor-trailer on the shoulder of Interstate 895, was killed yesterday when the rig drifted forward and ran over him, Maryland Transportation Authority police said. Thomas Martin, of the 400 block of Pineway Drive in Glen Burnie, was run over about 6:30 a.m. and pronounced dead at 2:55 p.m. at Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center, police said. Cpl. Gregory Prioleau said Martin had stopped his truck, loaded with paper, on the entrance ramp from Lombard Street to I-895.
NEWS
By Doug Struck and Doug Struck,Jerusalem Bureau | June 3, 1993
JERUSALEM -- The Russian woman came to Anton Razzouk's giftshop with a dozen enamel eggs -- beautifully handpainted in Moscow and St. Petersburg. For $100 each, he could have them.Mr. Razzouk politely sent her on her way. These days, it is a buyer's market in Russian art, and he can get handpainted eggs for a fraction of that.The collapse of the Soviet Union and the immigration of Soviet Jews to Israel has brought a wash of Russian art and handicrafts here.A lot of it is very pretty. Not all of it is real.
NEWS
By FROM STAFF REPORTS | February 28, 2001
In Baltimore City Arundel man, 65, dies after truck runs over him A 65-year-old Anne Arundel County man, who was repairing the brakes on his tractor-trailer on the shoulder of Interstate 895, was killed yesterday when the rig drifted forward and ran over him, Maryland Transportation Authority police said. Thomas Martin, of the 400 block of Pineway Drive in Glen Burnie, was run over about 6:30 a.m. and pronounced dead at 2:55 p.m. at Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center, police said. Cpl. Gregory Prioleau said Martin had stopped his truck, loaded with paper, on the entrance ramp from Lombard Street to I-895.
NEWS
By John Rivera and John Rivera,SUN STAFF | October 1, 1997
In a Maryland section article yesterday about Beth Isaac Adath Israel Congregation, the last name of Mark Wartzman was misspelled in a photo caption.The Sun regrets the error.The shofar, a ram's horn blown at the start of the Jewish High Holy Days in a call to repentance, will sound once more this year at Beth Isaac Adath Israel Congregation.Last year, the leadership of this Baltimore County synagogue with an aging and dwindling membership decided to close, either to relocate or merge with another synagogue.
NEWS
By Joan Jacobson and Joan Jacobson,SUN STAFF | November 4, 1996
Dimitri and Olga Kargman opened the Baltimore area's first "Russian pharmacy" in March with a built-in clientele of immigrant Russian Jews looking for herbal remedies and prescription drugs with instructions written in their native language.They quickly forged a relationship with a Russian doctor, Victoria V. Tsinberg, who sent patients from her Northwest Baltimore office to the couple's new Health-Rite Pharmacy in Pikesville.But after a little more than a month, say the Kargmans, Dr. Tsinberg stopped sending prescriptions their way, routing them instead to another new "Russian pharmacy" called Five Star.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | October 8, 1995
JERUSALEM -- When they were still in the Soviet Union dreaming of going to Israel, Soviet Jews used to ask: "What do you call a Soviet symphony orchestra after it returns from an engagement in Israel?" Answer: "A string quartet."When the big post-Communist wave arrived in Israel a few years ago, the new joke was: "A remarkable change has been observed among Israeli street cleaners. Two years ago they spoke Arabic. Since then, they have all learned Russian and acquired a higher education." After a few years in Israel, the Russian Jews told of placing an ad in a Moscow newspaper: "Soviet Jews!
NEWS
By Mark Guidera and Mark Guidera,Sun Staff Writer | June 15, 1994
Bella and Yakov Gelfand, who fled their Russian homeland five years ago, were torn between laughing and crying with joy last night as they each held a hand-size American flag and sang with hundreds of others the national anthem of their new country -- the United States of America."
NEWS
By Reported by Frank P. L. Somerville | May 26, 1994
About 50 Russian Jews, who fought for the Soviet Union during World War II, are scheduled to take part for the first time in Memorial Day services of Maryland's Jewish War Veterans group at 1 p.m. Sunday in Owings Mills.The participation of the former Soviet soldiers, now residents of the Baltimore area, is planned as part of the annual ceremonies sponsored by the veterans' group at the War Memorial on the grounds of the Jewish Community Center, 3506 Gwynnbrook Ave. The public is invited.
NEWS
By Mark Guidera and Mark Guidera,Sun Staff Writer | June 15, 1994
Bella and Yakov Gelfand, who fled their Russian homeland five years ago, were torn between laughing and crying with joy last night as they each held a hand-size American flag and sang with hundreds of others the national anthem of their new country -- the United States of America."
FEATURES
By Molly Dunham Glassman and Molly Dunham Glassman,Staff Writer | October 8, 1993
Patricia Polacco talks of sitting in front of the fireplace as a little girl, listening to her mother's mother -- her babushka -- tell stories. Many were versions of folk tales from the Ukraine, where Babushka was born. Some of them Babushka made up on her own."I remember, every time she'd finish a story, we'd lean toward her and say, 'Bubbie, is that a true story?' " Ms. Polacco said."And she'd say, 'Of course, it's true. But it may not have happened.' "Ms. Polacco inherited her grandmother's storytelling powers, and her belief in the power of stories.
FEATURES
By Molly Dunham Glassman and Molly Dunham Glassman,Staff Writer | October 8, 1993
Patricia Polacco talks of sitting in front of the fireplace as a little girl, listening to her mother's mother -- her babushka -- tell stories. Many were versions of folk tales from the Ukraine, where Babushka was born. Some of them Babushka made up on her own."I remember, every time she'd finish a story, we'd lean toward her and say, 'Bubbie, is that a true story?' " Ms. Polacco said."And she'd say, 'Of course, it's true. But it may not have happened.' "Ms. Polacco inherited her grandmother's storytelling powers, and her belief in the power of stories.
NEWS
By Doug Struck and Doug Struck,Jerusalem Bureau | June 3, 1993
JERUSALEM -- The Russian woman came to Anton Razzouk's giftshop with a dozen enamel eggs -- beautifully handpainted in Moscow and St. Petersburg. For $100 each, he could have them.Mr. Razzouk politely sent her on her way. These days, it is a buyer's market in Russian art, and he can get handpainted eggs for a fraction of that.The collapse of the Soviet Union and the immigration of Soviet Jews to Israel has brought a wash of Russian art and handicrafts here.A lot of it is very pretty. Not all of it is real.
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