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By Scott Shane and Scott Shane,Moscow Bureau of the Sun | May 14, 1991
MOSCOW -- With a prerevolutionary Russian flag as its emblem, correspondents in Armenia dodging Soviet Army bullets and satire aimed at Mikhail S. Gorbachev, Russian Federation Television made an irreverent debut yesterday.The advent of six-hour-a-day broadcasting from the first television company in the largest Soviet republic represents an important victory for Soviet reformers and especially for Russian leader Boris N. Yeltsin, whose access to Soviet television has been tightly controlled.
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NEWS
By Kathleen J. Smith | May 1, 2014
Russia annexed Ukraine's southern Crimea region, despite the fact that a significant minority of the Crimean population are not ethnically Russian nor interested in joining the Russian Federation. Approximately 12 percent of the Crimean population - over 250,000 people - are ethnically "Tatar," a largely pro-Ukrainian, Sunni Muslim group. They have an embattled history with Russia. In 1944, Stalin exiled the Tatar population to Central Asia, and over half of the population died in the forced migration.
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NEWS
By Scott Shane and Scott Shane,Moscow Bureau of The Sun | October 23, 1990
MOSCOW -- Move over, Maryland, U.S.A.Make room for Maryland, Russia.Yesterday, in the spirit of the times, the Marisky Autonomous Soviet Socialist Republic up and declared its sovereignty, taking on a new name: the Republic of Mary Land.This jurisdiction of 750,000 people occupies a territory a little smaller than the other Maryland, on the left bank of the Volga River in the middle of the Russian Federation. It has to date been one of 16 "autonomous" republics within the giant "union" republic, the Russian Federation.
NEWS
By Steve Phillips | March 20, 2014
President Barack Obama came into office promising to limit United States commitments abroad in order to focus on the economy and health care at home. Such an approach may have been prudent immediately after the excesses of the Bush administration, but strong measures are needed now to confront the crisis in Ukraine. During the past few weeks, political instability in Ukraine led to the resignation and flight of the pro-Russian president. Russia responded by invading part of Ukraine, Crimea, then engineering a vote for independence in that region.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | October 22, 1990
MOSCOW -- Democrats from 10 of the Soviet Union's fledgling parties and two dozen other political organizations formed a united front yesterday against the shaken but not yet beaten Communist Party.Democratic Russia, which claims support from 30 percent of the parliament of the Russian Federation and 60 percent of both the Moscow and Leningrad city councils, hopes to achieve a step-by-step takeover of power from the Communist Party, which has governed the Soviet Union for 73 years.To end this long monopoly on power, the new democratic movement, in a series of resolutions adopted at a weekend congress in Moscow, called for creating a multiparty democracy with a market economy based on private ownership of property.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | March 26, 1991
MOSCOW -- The Soviet government banned yesterday all political demonstrations in Moscow until mid-April to prevent backers of Russian Federation President Boris N. Yeltsin from holding a mass rally to support him in a showdown with Communist Party conservatives this week.A government order, requested by President Mikhail S. Gorbachev, prohibited the "Let Us Defend Yeltsin" rally that had been planned for central Moscow, just outside the Kremlin, on Thursday when the Russian Congress of People's Deputies begins a special session.
NEWS
By Scott Shane and Scott Shane,Moscow Bureau of The Sun | April 9, 1991
MOSCOW -- Vyacheslav S. Komissarov, duly appointed as Moscow's police chief by both the City Council and the Russian Federation Ministry of Internal Affairs, showed up yesterday at 10 a.m. sharp for his first day on the job.But the Moscow police, Mr. Komissarov's would-be subordinates, wouldn't let him in to police headquarters."
NEWS
By Scott Shane and Scott Shane,Moscow Bureau of The Sun | September 23, 1990
MOSCOW -- In a direct confrontation with Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev, Boris N. Yeltsin and the leadership of the Russian Federation officially warned the Soviet parliament yesterday not to grant the emergency powers requested by Mr. Gorbachev.In an emotional speech Friday, Mr. Gorbachev asked for the power to override existing law in connection with the planned transition to a market economy.But Russian Federation officials, citing Mr. Gorbachev's statement that he might have to dissolve some elected bodies, expressed fear that he could use special powers to dissolve the Russian parliament and impose direct presidential rule in the largest of the 15 Soviet republics.
NEWS
By Scott Shane and Scott Shane,Moscow Bureau of The Sun | March 16, 1991
MOSCOW -- Mikhail S. Gorbachev and Boris N. Yeltsin squared off yesterday over the referendum on whether to preserve the Soviet Union with competing broadcasts that dramatized the central role of the power struggle of the Soviet president with his populist rival in tomorrow's vote.Mr. Gorbachev pleaded for a vote in favor of preserving the Soviet Union as a "renewed federation of equal sovereign republics," saying that dissolution of the state would be a catastrophe."At issue is the fate of our country, the fate of our homeland, our common home, how we and our children and grandchildren will live," he said.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | August 22, 1991
MOSCOW -- Long after the tanks are quiet in their garrisons and the barricades dismantled, the indelible image of this week's abortive coup in the Soviet Union will be the picture of one defiant man -- Boris Yeltsin -- clambering up the dark green hull of a T-72 tank to rally his people for democracy.It was a quintessential Yeltsin moment. The burly Siberian had watched from the windows of his Russian Federation headquarters as the tanks surrounded the building Monday afternoon. After little more than an hour, he strode impulsively out the door, clambered up onto one of the armored vehicles, and greeted a tank officer as if he were a prospective voter instead of the spearhead of a hostile military force.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | March 17, 2014
In American domestic politics, messing with Social Security is known as "the third rail," referring to the power source for trains that is fatal to the touch. In foreign policy discussions, invoking the name of Adolf Hitler promises the same lethal result. Former first lady and secretary of state Hillary Clinton learned the lesson in the wake of Russia's invasion of Crimea and parts of Ukraine. She caught hell from critics when she compared it to Hitler's 1938 seizure of the heavily German Sudetenland in Czechoslovakia under Neville Chamberlain's notorious pact with the devil in Munich.
NEWS
August 5, 2013
Kevin Rector made some good arguments for not boycotting the Sochi Olympics, but he is overlooking some important issues (" Why boycotting Winter Olympics in anti-gay Russia isn't the right move," Aug. 1). First, the law prohibiting gay propaganda is an adjunct to a recently passed law that prohibits gay people from adopting children. Both these laws are based upon a scientific fallacy that the citizenry accepts as doctrine. It's untrue he lie that gay people are a threat to children.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop, The Baltimore Sun | April 28, 2013
When Albina Digaeva, a Chechen who was granted political asylum in the United States, first learned that the Boston bombing suspects were from Chechnya, she called the California family who initially put her up when she arrived 15 years ago and apologized. A member of the host family that originally hailed from Boston "tried to calm me down and said I can't claim responsibility for the actions of two individuals," said Digaeva, who now lives in Los Angeles and doesn't know the two brothers suspected in the bombing.
SPORTS
November 26, 2009
• TENNIS: Rafael Nadal fell out of contention for a spot in the semifinals at the ATP World Tour Finals with a second straight defeat, losing to Nikolay Davydenko . Nadal looked sluggish throughout and was thoroughly outplayed by the Russian. Earlier, Robin Soderling became the first player to reach the semis by beating Novak Djokovic , ending his 11-match winning streak. ... Nadal officially was chosen to play for Spain in the Dec. 4-6 Davis Cup final against the Czech Republic.
NEWS
By Megan K. Stack and Megan K. Stack,LOS ANGELES TIMES | December 11, 2007
MOSCOW -- President Vladimir V. Putin yesterday backed First Deputy Prime Minister Dmitry Medvedev as a candidate to succeed him, abruptly snatching away the shroud of secrecy that has obscured the hunt for a new Russian leader. The country has been waiting anxiously for Putin, who finishes his second term in office next year, to anoint a successor. Conventional wisdom in Moscow has long taken it for granted that whomever Putin tapped would be elected president. Still, Putin's surprise endorsement startled many analysts.
NEWS
By Kim Murphy and Kim Murphy,LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 29, 2004
ARGUN, Russia - Among the insurgents fighting in Chechnya's long-running war for independence, Musost Khutiyev is known as a "national traitor." This is because he forgave the Russians whose troops seized his 18-year-old son, removed his vital organs, and then ransomed the body back to Khutiyev for $1,500. Khutiyev, who commanded the Chechen rebels' Argun unit until 2002, is deputy mayor of the same city; his security forces are fighting the rebels in collaboration with Russian troops; and when he goes to the polls in today's presidential election, he will cast his vote for Alu Alkhanov, the candidate the Kremlin wants to see installed as Chechnya's next president.
NEWS
By Scott Shane and Scott Shane,Moscow Bureau of The Sun | March 22, 1991
MOSCOW -- The Soviet parliament asked national and Moscow authorities yesterday to ban demonstrations scheduled for next week's opening of the Russian Federation Congress of People's Deputies, when a major rally in support of Russian leader Boris N. Yeltsin is planned.The Supreme Soviet also decided to appeal to all local soviets, or governing councils, to declare a moratorium on political strikes and demonstrations until the economy is stabilized. Miners at about one-fourth of the country's 600 coal mines are striking, many of them demanding the resignation of President Mikhail S. Gorbachev and the dissolution of the Soviet parliament.
NEWS
By Douglas Birch and Douglas Birch,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | October 29, 2002
MOSCOW - President Vladimir V. Putin said yesterday that he is granting the Russian military expanded powers to fight terrorism and is prepared to follow in the footsteps of the United States by striking at threats beyond its borders. Putin's remarks to his Cabinet came as Russians soberly reassessed the raid led by counterterrorism troops Saturday to free hundreds of hostages held by Chechen guerrillas in a Moscow theater. Officials acknowledged that all but one of the 117 hostages killed in the raid died from the effects of a debilitating gas pumped into the theater.
NEWS
By Douglas Birch and Douglas Birch,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | October 19, 2002
MOSCOW - It was, as assassinations go, a fairly routine affair. The governor of the Magadan district arrived at a federal building on Moscow's Novy Arbat, a strip of flashy casinos and stores not far from the Kremlin, at 8:45 a.m. yesterday. He was met by a man with a silencer-equipped Makarov pistol. On the crowded, rain-darkened sidewalk, the gunman fired a single shot in the head of Valentin Tsvetkov, killing the 54-year-old on the spot. The assassin left the gun nearby, a catch-me-if-you-can gesture popular among Russia's hit men. He and an accomplice drove away in a boxy Zhiguili sedan.
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