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NEWS
By Will Englund and Will Englund,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | October 5, 1998
MOSCOW -- Because of its towering, glimmering-green headquarters here, Russia's sprawling and powerful natural gas monopoly came to be known to admirers and critics alike as the Emerald City.And its boss, Rem Vyakhirev, was the Wizard.Vyakhirev himself said he liked the image. Gazprom, as the company is more formally known, became a domain unto itself in post-Soviet Russia, a Land of Oz that made the mighty tremble and left plain folks in awe. It dictated to the government and vaulted Vyakhirev, a grandfatherly lover of fishing and Russian folk songs who once wanted nothing more than to run away to sea, into the ranks of the tycoons who sat at the heart of Russia's peculiar capitalism.
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NEWS
By JOHN P. ROBINSON and VLADIMIR ANDREYENKOV | February 2, 1992
The predominant tone of news stories coming from Moscow is relentlessly pessimistic. Empty stores, prices out of reach for those goods that can be found, lack of fuel, massive unemployment and the promise of new problems and greater uncertainty ahead are what the American news audience hears about from the former Soviet Union.To assess the situation more objectively and to put events in the perspective of how ordinary Russians are coping in these difficult times, we conducted a telephone poll of a cross-section of 525 Moscovites last month to get a first-hand account.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | March 7, 2014
To hear some American hawks talk about President Obama's reaction to the Russian move into Crimea, you'd think he's grabbed Neville Chamberlain's umbrella of appeasement and rushed off to Munich. But Mr. Obama's response to Russian President Vladimir Putin's power move in Crimea can hardly be compared to the British prime minister's fateful surrender to Adolf Hitler's blatant theft of the Sudetenland from Czechoslovakia in 1938. Chamberlain was an open advocate of appeasement before it became a dirty word.
NEWS
By Carl M. Cannon and Carl M. Cannon,Washington Bureau of the Sun | September 26, 1994
WASHINGTON -- Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin arrived in the United States yesterday for a weeklong visit that in some ways, one Clinton administration official quipped, harks back to "the good old days" of the Cold War.For the first time in the Clinton presidency, the discussions won't be dominated by how to prop up the Russian economy -- and on the awkward and related matter of where Mr. Yeltsin can lay his hands on billions of dollars in U.S. aid."It's...
NEWS
By Jay Hancock and Jay Hancock,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | May 19, 2001
WASHINGTON - President Bush will hold an earlier-than-planned first meeting with Russian President Vladimir V. Putin next month in Slovenia to discuss touchy subjects such as missile defense, human rights, Russia's economy and Moscow's arms sales to Iran, officials said yesterday. Meeting almost nonstop with Bush and other U.S. officials yesterday to lay the groundwork for the summit, Russian Foreign Minister Igor Ivanov said at a news conference that "we're convinced that the upcoming summit will become a major threshold in the relationship between our two countries."
NEWS
By Bill Atkinson and Bill Atkinson,SUN STAFF | August 28, 1998
Stock markets around the world were jolted yesterday by Russia's failing economy and rumors of President Boris N. Yeltsin's resignation, which sparked near-panic selling of stocks.Those fears were compounded by concerns that a plan to bail out Japan's troubled economy has hit a wall, and that American banks and corporations will suffer if both countries don't resolve their problems soon.The Dow Jones industrial average slid 357.36 points, or 4.19 percent, to 8,165.99, marking its third-largest point loss in history.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | April 1, 1992
WASHINGTON -- The International Monetary Fund said yesterday that it had endorsed Russia's economic reform plan, paving the way for Moscow to receive up to $4 billion in IMF aid over the next year.IMF officials said Russia could begin receiving loans from the fund as early as May, a move that will place the Russian economy to some extent under the stewardship of the IMF.To qualify for the aid, Moscow still would be required to meet certain conditions including stringent targets to control the inflation rate and budget deficit.
BUSINESS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,Washington Bureau | April 28, 1992
WASHINGTON -- Russia and most of the former Soviet republics were invited yesterday to join the capitalist world's two premier financial institutions, clearing the way for a massive injection of Western aid and what Moscow's new economic "czar" called a "radical speeding up" of foreign investment.The admission of the emergent democracies widens the global scope of the World Bank and the International Monetary Fund.The two institutions, formed at a meeting of 44 nations in the New Hampshire village of Bretton Woods in 1944, have helped guide economic and financial order in the free world since.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Scott Shane and By Scott Shane,Sun Staff | March 7, 1999
When Richard Milhous Nixon met Boris Nikolayevich Yeltsin in Moscow in the spring of 1991, the Russian expressed pleasure at the remarkable connection between the two men. Nixon's grandfather, Yeltsin recalled, had lived for a time as a businessman in Yeltsin's hometown, the industrial city of Sverdlovsk in the Ural Mountains. "Maybe we are even relatives!" Yeltsin cheerfully declared. It was a promising beginning to the conversation, except for one thing. Neither of Nixon's grandfathers had ever left the United States.
NEWS
By Robyn Dixon and Robyn Dixon,LOS ANGELES TIMES | October 27, 2003
MOSCOW - Russia's richest man, oil tycoon Mikhail Khodorkovsky, spent his first night in jail Saturday sharing a small cell in a chaotic and overcrowded detention center with five other men, as officials warned that the billionaire would not get special treatment. Khodorkovsky's arrest, which is expected to trigger shocks in Moscow's markets today, has concerned U.S. officials. The U.S. ambassador to Moscow, Alexander Vershbow, warned yesterday that the arrest could alarm foreign investors.
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