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By Douglas Birch and Douglas Birch,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | February 9, 2003
MOSCOW - Mikhail Y. Shvydkoi, Russia's minister of culture, is entrusted with keeping the flame of Russia's high culture flickering during these turbulent times. The 62-year-old theater scholar is responsible for his nation's most prominent arts institutions, including the Bolshoi Theater in Moscow and the Hermitage Museum and the Russian State Museum in St. Petersburg. He has been named by Art Review magazine as one of the 100 most influential people in the art world. Shvydkoi was invited to visit Baltimore for the Vivat!
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NEWS
By Douglas Birch and Douglas Birch,Sun Staff | August 27, 2006
We moved back from Moscow a year ago, and there are lots of things I miss about the place: the sardonic humor, Baltika beer, the cold snap that comes in late August. But one thing I never expected to feel nostalgic about, and certainly do, is Russian culture's healthy skepticism about the value of always telling the truth. Lies, of course, can be despicable things. But in the West, the gentle art of deception - the flamboyant, shameless or spiritually uplifting stretcher - has long since fallen out of fashion.
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FEATURES
April 7, 1998
Visual magicSpecial effects will mesmerize you at Visual Magic, where the world of computer animations, 3-D graphics and digital eye candy comes to life. The online magazine is produced by visual and special effects artists from around the world, and has info on everything from movies to make-up to cartoons. Follow the bouncing pixel to http://visualmagic.awn.com/ and discover how the filmmakers from "Titanic" created digital humans and other extraordinary effects. You'll also get the lowdown on 3-D scanners, software and killer graphics applications.
NEWS
By ALEX RODRIGUEZ and ALEX RODRIGUEZ,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | April 21, 2006
MOSCOW -- The treatment may seem like alchemy to most, but Elvira Beisebayeva swears by the salves and cure-alls she whipped up on a recent afternoon in the living room of her tiny apartment on the outskirts of Russia's capital. The compress she made from a cabbage leaf, fermented milk and chalk makes breast cysts vanish, she said. A pungent, gray-green goo made from an herb called bur marigold, rubbing alcohol, lanolin and Vaseline subdued the severe psoriasis that had caused her 12-year-old daughter's scalp to bleed.
FEATURES
September 15, 1998
Be a 4Kids DetectiveVisit these Web sites to find the answers, then go to http://www.4Kids.org/detectives/* Which Norseman occupied Kiev in 862?* What year did Alfred the Great rule Wessex?* From which two sources did Terraserver get its images?Live the Russian ExperienceFrom the Rurik Dynasty to Glasnost, you'll experience Russian culture and history like never before at PBS' The Face of Russia Web site. This fascinating journey through 10 centuries of art, architecture, music, dance and cinema reveals the events that shaped Russian culture.
NEWS
By Tanika White and Tanika White,SUN STAFF | October 5, 2003
When Yury Ronzhes arrived in the United States from his home in Krivoy Rog, Ukraine, he was proud of his Jewish heritage, but he knew nothing about the history, traditions or customs of his own religion. Since meeting Rabbi Velvel Belinsky - a Russian-speaking spiritual leader who specializes in helping Russian Jews learn more about Judaism - Ronzhes has taken Jewish-related classes and is happy to be attending Yom Kippur services with his wife and mother-in-law. Millions of Jews around the world will usher in Yom Kippur - the Day of Atonement - with Kol Nidre services at sundown today, starting 25 hours of fasting, prayer and repentance.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Pakenham | December 30, 2001
Kosmos, photographs by Adam Bartos, essay by Svetlana Boym (Princeton Architectural Press, 176 pages, $40). This is a cosmological coffee table book. Mainly, it is 94 astonishingly fine color photographs, all taken between June 1995 and April 1999 at various points in Russia, all having to do with the space program there. Many are at the Baikonur cosmodrome in the Kazakhstan desert, a primary research and launch site of the old Soviet Union's immense space flight efforts. All were taken by Bartos, a distinguished architectural and journalistic photographer from New York.
NEWS
By Lisa Respers and Lisa Respers,Contributing Writer | July 7, 1993
Robin Espenschade loves Russian culture and helping people.For the past six months, Ms. Espenschade, 28, has been able to combine her two loves by working as a missionary in St. Petersburg, Russia."
NEWS
By Lan Nguyen and Lan Nguyen,Staff Writer | December 30, 1993
Saveliy Liberman strides into the room at Mount Hebron High School with a big smile as he chatters away in his native Russian.He's short, husky and balding, with brown hair and brown eyes and a face that exudes warmth and instills enthusiasm.Mr. Saveliy's students, a handful of seniors, stand when he enters the room, the Russian way of showing respect to their teacher.XTC In Russian, the 45-year-old custodian and former music professor asks the students about their weekend, and asks them to say their names in Russian.
FEATURES
By Will Englund and Will Englund,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | October 1, 1999
MOSCOW -- The literary historian Dmitri Sergeyevich Likhachev, who learned about hopelessness and survival first in a Soviet prison camp in the 1920s and again in blockaded Leningrad during World War II, died yesterday in St. Petersburg. He was 92.Mr. Likhachev was Russia's most respected scholar, a man whose eloquently expressed dark views about the course of Russian culture brought him attention until nearly the last days of his life. He embodied his country's painful 20th century history in a way no other intellectual could claim -- from a remembered glimpse of Alexis, the heir to the Romanov throne, in St. Petersburg before the Russian Revolution, to his work as adviser on cultural affairs to President Boris N. Yeltsin.
NEWS
By Sara Neufeld and Sara Neufeld,SUN STAFF | January 27, 2004
When the time came to elect a language class at Dumbarton Middle School in 1971, Monty Phair's love of James Bond movies prompted him to choose Russian over Spanish or French. He and his friends formed the "007 Gang," walking down the halls in trench coats and dark glasses. Inspired by From Russia With Love, Phair stuck with Russian classes at Parkville High School until 1975. Today, that exposure has become a lifeline for scores of Russian immigrants who rely on Phair to recommend lawyers, doctors and - most of all - books.
NEWS
By Tanika White and Tanika White,SUN STAFF | October 5, 2003
When Yury Ronzhes arrived in the United States from his home in Krivoy Rog, Ukraine, he was proud of his Jewish heritage, but he knew nothing about the history, traditions or customs of his own religion. Since meeting Rabbi Velvel Belinsky - a Russian-speaking spiritual leader who specializes in helping Russian Jews learn more about Judaism - Ronzhes has taken Jewish-related classes and is happy to be attending Yom Kippur services with his wife and mother-in-law. Millions of Jews around the world will usher in Yom Kippur - the Day of Atonement - with Kol Nidre services at sundown today, starting 25 hours of fasting, prayer and repentance.
NEWS
By Douglas Birch and Douglas Birch,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | February 9, 2003
MOSCOW - Mikhail Y. Shvydkoi, Russia's minister of culture, is entrusted with keeping the flame of Russia's high culture flickering during these turbulent times. The 62-year-old theater scholar is responsible for his nation's most prominent arts institutions, including the Bolshoi Theater in Moscow and the Hermitage Museum and the Russian State Museum in St. Petersburg. He has been named by Art Review magazine as one of the 100 most influential people in the art world. Shvydkoi was invited to visit Baltimore for the Vivat!
NEWS
By Douglas Birch and Douglas Birch,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | December 9, 2002
MOSCOW - When the novelist and short story writer Viktor Yerofeyev dared to publish an anthology of unauthorized literary works in 1979, Soviet authorities accused him of producing "pornography." He was then barred from publishing a word of his writing for eight years. Now, at the age of 55, Yerofeyev, an author who mixes the philosophical and the erotic, is once again the target of a moral crusade. The author is being harassed not by dour agents of the KGB but by a nationwide association of students known as Moving Together, who revere the country's president, Vladimir V. Putin - a dour former agent of the KGB. Like the Communist Party's guardians of public morals, Moving Together finds Yerofeyev's sardonic view of Russian society offensive to the point of being obscene.
FEATURES
By Arthur Hirsch and Arthur Hirsch,SUN STAFF | March 20, 2002
Baltimore cultural organizations large and small have taken the wraps off plans for a citywide festival next winter celebrating Russian arts of all sorts - music, dance, painting, theater and film. There may even be borscht. Pegged to the 300th anniversary of the city considered Russia's cultural capital, Vivat! St. Petersburg represents an unprecedented cooperative effort by Baltimore's arts organizations to stage an event tailored to put the city under a national spotlight. "We need to realize we are major league, we can play in the major leagues," said Carroll R. Armstrong, president and chief executive of the Baltimore Area Convention and Visitors Association.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Pakenham | December 30, 2001
Kosmos, photographs by Adam Bartos, essay by Svetlana Boym (Princeton Architectural Press, 176 pages, $40). This is a cosmological coffee table book. Mainly, it is 94 astonishingly fine color photographs, all taken between June 1995 and April 1999 at various points in Russia, all having to do with the space program there. Many are at the Baikonur cosmodrome in the Kazakhstan desert, a primary research and launch site of the old Soviet Union's immense space flight efforts. All were taken by Bartos, a distinguished architectural and journalistic photographer from New York.
NEWS
By Douglas Birch and Douglas Birch,Sun Staff | August 27, 2006
We moved back from Moscow a year ago, and there are lots of things I miss about the place: the sardonic humor, Baltika beer, the cold snap that comes in late August. But one thing I never expected to feel nostalgic about, and certainly do, is Russian culture's healthy skepticism about the value of always telling the truth. Lies, of course, can be despicable things. But in the West, the gentle art of deception - the flamboyant, shameless or spiritually uplifting stretcher - has long since fallen out of fashion.
NEWS
By ALEX RODRIGUEZ and ALEX RODRIGUEZ,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | April 21, 2006
MOSCOW -- The treatment may seem like alchemy to most, but Elvira Beisebayeva swears by the salves and cure-alls she whipped up on a recent afternoon in the living room of her tiny apartment on the outskirts of Russia's capital. The compress she made from a cabbage leaf, fermented milk and chalk makes breast cysts vanish, she said. A pungent, gray-green goo made from an herb called bur marigold, rubbing alcohol, lanolin and Vaseline subdued the severe psoriasis that had caused her 12-year-old daughter's scalp to bleed.
NEWS
September 3, 2000
THIS SUMMER of calamities can't end soon enough for Russia. First the nuclear submarine catastrophe, then the deadly fire at Moscow's television tower, and now the intervention of President Vladimir Putin to save the Bolshoi theater, symbol of Russian cultural greatness. The Bolshoi has been in critical condition for years. Many of its brightest stars have fled to jobs abroad. At home, its St. Petersburg arch-rival, the Marinsky, has often provided better ballet and opera. Even the landmark's 144-year-old oak pillars are rotting.
FEATURES
By Will Englund and Will Englund,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | October 1, 1999
MOSCOW -- The literary historian Dmitri Sergeyevich Likhachev, who learned about hopelessness and survival first in a Soviet prison camp in the 1920s and again in blockaded Leningrad during World War II, died yesterday in St. Petersburg. He was 92.Mr. Likhachev was Russia's most respected scholar, a man whose eloquently expressed dark views about the course of Russian culture brought him attention until nearly the last days of his life. He embodied his country's painful 20th century history in a way no other intellectual could claim -- from a remembered glimpse of Alexis, the heir to the Romanov throne, in St. Petersburg before the Russian Revolution, to his work as adviser on cultural affairs to President Boris N. Yeltsin.
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