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By Lisa Respers and Lisa Respers,SUN STAFF | March 18, 1999
The four girls and one boy who arrived this week at Ring Factory Elementary School in Bel Air are pretty typical youngsters.They love playing basketball, eating ice cream and making friends. But for one month they are experiencing what other children probably take for granted -- living in America and having a family.It's part of an innovative adoption program in which Russian children live with families and attend school in Harford County while parents are sought for them. The program is designed to cushion the culture shock often experienced by children of international adoptions, while giving prospective parents a chance to get to know them.
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NEWS
By Howard Altstein | April 23, 2013
Sen. Ben Cardin of Maryland recently met with the family of Sergei Magnitsky. The reasons for the meeting: In 2009, Mr. Magnitsky was jailed in Russia for exposing governmental corruption. While in prison, he died after allegedly being tortured. In December, with the energetic legislative support of Senator Cardin, Congress passed a statute, the Magnitsky Act, forbidding those accused of human rights abuses in Russia from traveling to the U.S. This month, the Magnitsky family came to Washington to thank Senator Cardin for his efforts.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Dorothy Fleetwood | September 21, 1995
Children's FestivalBob McGrath and Big Bird from "Sesame Street" will head the bill of international talent at the 1995 International Children's Festival Saturday and Sunday at Wolf Trap Farm Park for the Performing Arts in Vienna, Va. The festival features performances by students from all over the world as well as hands-on workshops where children can learn wall painting from Africa, lei making from Hawaii, Navajo sand painting and origami from Japan.Young...
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | April 17, 2013
Sen. Ben Cardin is scheduled to meet Thursday with the family of a Russian lawyer whose death sparked an international outcry over human rights in that country, renewing focus on a controversy that has complicated U.S.-Russian relations at a sensitive time. The meeting with the widow, mother and son of Sergei Magnitsky — who died in a Russian jail in 2009 after exposing corruption in the Russian government — comes just days after the State Department released a list of Russian officials barred from obtaining U.S. visas over alleged human rights abuses.
NEWS
By Howard Altstein | April 23, 2013
Sen. Ben Cardin of Maryland recently met with the family of Sergei Magnitsky. The reasons for the meeting: In 2009, Mr. Magnitsky was jailed in Russia for exposing governmental corruption. While in prison, he died after allegedly being tortured. In December, with the energetic legislative support of Senator Cardin, Congress passed a statute, the Magnitsky Act, forbidding those accused of human rights abuses in Russia from traveling to the U.S. This month, the Magnitsky family came to Washington to thank Senator Cardin for his efforts.
NEWS
By LARRY STURGILL | June 7, 1995
A year and a half ago, when Debbie McFadden walked through the door carrying a large shipping box, Jed Castelbaum, the owner of Parcel Plus, the mail and business services store in Dorsey's Search Village Center, greeted the new customer with his usual friendly smile.The package was one of many that Mr. Castelbaum would ship for her in the ensuing months, and a cordial business relationship developed quickly. But Mr. Castelbaum had no idea that his new customer soon would be instrumental in helping him and his wife, Susan, adopt a child from overseas.
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | April 17, 2013
Sen. Ben Cardin is scheduled to meet Thursday with the family of a Russian lawyer whose death sparked an international outcry over human rights in that country, renewing focus on a controversy that has complicated U.S.-Russian relations at a sensitive time. The meeting with the widow, mother and son of Sergei Magnitsky — who died in a Russian jail in 2009 after exposing corruption in the Russian government — comes just days after the State Department released a list of Russian officials barred from obtaining U.S. visas over alleged human rights abuses.
NEWS
By Janene Holzberg, Special to The Baltimore Sun | July 15, 2011
Rita Allan is a biology teacher in the Howard County school system and was a biologist for 20 years before that, so when she learned that the Colombian boy who would be visiting her family likes science and nature, she took special note of their shared interest. Still, she and her husband, Steve, chose to keep their expectations low when they signed on with Kidsave International to host Duvan, an 11-year-old orphan, in their Columbia home for just over four weeks this summer. The couple, who have no children and have been awaiting the call to care for a child since becoming licensed foster parents in December 2009, didn't want to set themselves up for disappointment.
NEWS
By Arthur Hartman | March 3, 1992
NO ASPECT of the cataclysmic economic breakdown afflicting the former Soviet people cries out for help as poignantly as the probable fate of millions of children, should the West not give them emergency medical aid.Americans can trust that U.S. medical professionals who administer vaccinations and medications are competent, that hospitals and clinics are sanitary, the needles sterile, the drugs safe.Parents in the former Soviet Union do not have this assurance. The new commonwealth can produce only 15 to 20 percent of the medical supplies it needs, and it does not have enough hard currency to import them.
NEWS
August 15, 2002
The Carroll County Farm Museum will play host Saturday to several orphaned Russian children who are visiting through a Frederick adoption agency. The six children, ages 6 to 10, will visit the farm museum in Westminster from 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. to see the grounds, buildings and farm animals. They will make lemonade and homemade ice cream. The Cherry Orchard Project, an adoption program of the Frank Adoption Center in Frederick, brings Russian orphaned children to the United States. The children, who speak primarily Russian and have not been told they are candidates for adoption, are on a holiday to see life in the United States.
NEWS
By Janene Holzberg, Special to The Baltimore Sun | July 15, 2011
Rita Allan is a biology teacher in the Howard County school system and was a biologist for 20 years before that, so when she learned that the Colombian boy who would be visiting her family likes science and nature, she took special note of their shared interest. Still, she and her husband, Steve, chose to keep their expectations low when they signed on with Kidsave International to host Duvan, an 11-year-old orphan, in their Columbia home for just over four weeks this summer. The couple, who have no children and have been awaiting the call to care for a child since becoming licensed foster parents in December 2009, didn't want to set themselves up for disappointment.
NEWS
August 15, 2002
The Carroll County Farm Museum will play host Saturday to several orphaned Russian children who are visiting through a Frederick adoption agency. The six children, ages 6 to 10, will visit the farm museum in Westminster from 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. to see the grounds, buildings and farm animals. They will make lemonade and homemade ice cream. The Cherry Orchard Project, an adoption program of the Frank Adoption Center in Frederick, brings Russian orphaned children to the United States. The children, who speak primarily Russian and have not been told they are candidates for adoption, are on a holiday to see life in the United States.
NEWS
By Lisa Respers and Lisa Respers,SUN STAFF | March 18, 1999
The four girls and one boy who arrived this week at Ring Factory Elementary School in Bel Air are pretty typical youngsters.They love playing basketball, eating ice cream and making friends. But for one month they are experiencing what other children probably take for granted -- living in America and having a family.It's part of an innovative adoption program in which Russian children live with families and attend school in Harford County while parents are sought for them. The program is designed to cushion the culture shock often experienced by children of international adoptions, while giving prospective parents a chance to get to know them.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Dorothy Fleetwood | September 21, 1995
Children's FestivalBob McGrath and Big Bird from "Sesame Street" will head the bill of international talent at the 1995 International Children's Festival Saturday and Sunday at Wolf Trap Farm Park for the Performing Arts in Vienna, Va. The festival features performances by students from all over the world as well as hands-on workshops where children can learn wall painting from Africa, lei making from Hawaii, Navajo sand painting and origami from Japan.Young...
NEWS
By LARRY STURGILL | June 7, 1995
A year and a half ago, when Debbie McFadden walked through the door carrying a large shipping box, Jed Castelbaum, the owner of Parcel Plus, the mail and business services store in Dorsey's Search Village Center, greeted the new customer with his usual friendly smile.The package was one of many that Mr. Castelbaum would ship for her in the ensuing months, and a cordial business relationship developed quickly. But Mr. Castelbaum had no idea that his new customer soon would be instrumental in helping him and his wife, Susan, adopt a child from overseas.
NEWS
By Arthur Hartman | March 3, 1992
NO ASPECT of the cataclysmic economic breakdown afflicting the former Soviet people cries out for help as poignantly as the probable fate of millions of children, should the West not give them emergency medical aid.Americans can trust that U.S. medical professionals who administer vaccinations and medications are competent, that hospitals and clinics are sanitary, the needles sterile, the drugs safe.Parents in the former Soviet Union do not have this assurance. The new commonwealth can produce only 15 to 20 percent of the medical supplies it needs, and it does not have enough hard currency to import them.
NEWS
By Richard Irwin and William Wan and Richard Irwin and William Wan,SUN STAFF | August 3, 2005
A Harford County couple have been charged with manslaughter and related offenses in the January death of their 8-year-old adopted son - apparently from starvation. Samuel Merryman, 37, and his wife, Donna Merryman, 42, both of the 4400 block of Flintville Road in Whiteford, were each freed on $50,000 bail Monday, authorities said. The boy, Dennis Merryman, was one of four Russian children adopted in 2000 by the couple, who also have two children of their own and one from a previous relationship, according to their lawyer, Carl Schlaich.
NEWS
By FROM STAFF REPORTS | December 22, 2004
IN BALTIMORE COUNTY Russian story time to be offered at library PIKESVILLE -- A Winter Russian Story Time will be offered from 10:30 a.m. to 11 a.m. today at the Pikesville library branch, 1301 Reisterstown Road. Readers will present stories in English and Russian for children age 2 to 6. Children must be accompanied by an adult. Information: 410-887-1234.
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