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By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Art Critic | January 16, 1994
They're under-priced. They're under-exposed, both here and in their homeland. But some of the world's leading museums are buying them. And now, at last, they've come to Baltimore."
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By Robyn Dixon and Robyn Dixon,LOS ANGELES TIMES | October 20, 2003
MOSCOW -- Zurab Tsereteli, the court sculptor whose work decorates the capital, is used to being derided by critics and rivals as the king of kitsch. At 69, he sails on a sea of controversy, his ego billowing like a wind-filled spinnaker that no criticism can deflate. Though his work often raises hackles on his home turf, it is his latest project that is roiling the waves in two countries. Tsereteli's tribute to victims of the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks in the United States -- a 100-foot splintered pylon with a giant teardrop-shaped glob of glass that he says will exude drops like real tears -- will soon be built on the waterfront in Jersey City, N.J. Whether from sour grapes or plain disbelief at Tsereteli's success, some members of the Russian art and architecture world see the planned monument as evidence that the taste of U.S. public officials can be as questionable as that of Moscow's leaders.
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NEWS
By Douglas Birch and Douglas Birch,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | February 16, 2003
ST. PETERSBURG, Russia - For two centuries, Russian artists enjoyed the patronage of the powerful. As servants to the nobility, they were rewarded with riches and comfort. As Soviet-era "architects of the soul," those who followed the party line enjoyed status and privilege. In return, they created a wealth of music, art, dance and theater. Now the centuries-old paternalistic tradition that produced Tchaikovsky the composer, Pavlova the dancer and Kandinsky the painter is gone. The czars who once nourished the arts and the Soviet Communists who lavishly financed them - within strict creative boundaries - have been relegated to history.
NEWS
By Douglas Birch and Douglas Birch,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | February 16, 2003
ST. PETERSBURG, Russia - For two centuries, Russian artists enjoyed the patronage of the powerful. As servants to the nobility, they were rewarded with riches and comfort. As Soviet-era "architects of the soul," those who followed the party line enjoyed status and privilege. In return, they created a wealth of music, art, dance and theater. Now the centuries-old paternalistic tradition that produced Tchaikovsky the composer, Pavlova the dancer and Kandinsky the painter is gone. The czars who once nourished the arts and the Soviet Communists who lavishly financed them - within strict creative boundaries - have been relegated to history.
FEATURES
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | February 12, 2003
The artistic ferment that swept Europe at the turn of the 20th century saw young artists everywhere reject the tradition of elaborate realistic depiction - a tradition epitomized by the art of the official French Salons - in favor of the bold forms and bright colors of so-called "primitive" art. In Paris, Picasso and Braque invented cubism inspired by their discovery of African sculpture. Gauguin and Matisse emulated the qualities of Japanese prints, the decorative arts of Oceania and the Near East, and children's drawings.
NEWS
By Robyn Dixon and Robyn Dixon,LOS ANGELES TIMES | October 20, 2003
MOSCOW -- Zurab Tsereteli, the court sculptor whose work decorates the capital, is used to being derided by critics and rivals as the king of kitsch. At 69, he sails on a sea of controversy, his ego billowing like a wind-filled spinnaker that no criticism can deflate. Though his work often raises hackles on his home turf, it is his latest project that is roiling the waves in two countries. Tsereteli's tribute to victims of the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks in the United States -- a 100-foot splintered pylon with a giant teardrop-shaped glob of glass that he says will exude drops like real tears -- will soon be built on the waterfront in Jersey City, N.J. Whether from sour grapes or plain disbelief at Tsereteli's success, some members of the Russian art and architecture world see the planned monument as evidence that the taste of U.S. public officials can be as questionable as that of Moscow's leaders.
FEATURES
By Kathy Lally and Kathy Lally,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | June 4, 2001
ST. PETERSBURG, Russia - The iconic moment arrived when Gary Vikan, director of the Walters Art Museum, pulled out a priceless Malevich painting lying all too casually on its side in a metal rack in the basement of the State Russian Museum. Several trustees from the Walters watched in wonder at yet another startling moment in their journey of discovery. They had flown 4,000 miles from Maryland to prepare themselves for two ambitious exhibitions the Walters is planning, one in 2003 devoted to the Russian avant-garde, the other in 2004 to icons.
FEATURES
By Robyn Dixon and Robyn Dixon,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 9, 2002
ST. PETERSBURG, Russia - He started out convinced that he would become Russia's Picasso. But it's unlikely you will have heard of Sergei Yushkevich. At 43, his hair is graying and slightly wispy, and the skin around his eyes is delicately etched with the wrinkles left by a million smiles. He knows he is good at what he does. He wields his brushes and oils with dexterity and skill. But doubts swirl in his soul like snowflakes whipped by the winter wind outside his studio window. Is he an artist?
NEWS
October 3, 1990
WESTMINSTER - The artwork of more than 30 children from Leningrad will be displayed at the Carroll County Public Library during October.The young Russian artists, ranging in age from 6 to 17, display works that include interpretations of fairy tales, pencil drawings, watercolors and block prints.School teacher Ruth Aukerman is coordinating the display. She got the art from Yuri Reshkin, a painter who spent 30 years as art education supervisor in Leningrad.Information: 848-4250.
NEWS
November 30, 1992
Art center to display Russian worksRussian artists Genady and Elena Zolotnitsky will be the guests of honor at a 6 p.m. reception Thursday marking the opening of an exhibit of their paintings at the Columbia Art Center in Long Reach Village. The public is invited.Both artists were educated at the Moscow State College of the Arts, Mr. Zolotnitsky in Fine Arts and Mrs. Zolotnitsky in Cinematography and Fine Arts.Mr. Zolotnitsky's works have been exhibited in Moscow, Israel and Poland. Mrs. Zolotnitsky's paintings have been on display in Moscow and Rome.
FEATURES
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | February 12, 2003
The artistic ferment that swept Europe at the turn of the 20th century saw young artists everywhere reject the tradition of elaborate realistic depiction - a tradition epitomized by the art of the official French Salons - in favor of the bold forms and bright colors of so-called "primitive" art. In Paris, Picasso and Braque invented cubism inspired by their discovery of African sculpture. Gauguin and Matisse emulated the qualities of Japanese prints, the decorative arts of Oceania and the Near East, and children's drawings.
FEATURES
By Robyn Dixon and Robyn Dixon,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 9, 2002
ST. PETERSBURG, Russia - He started out convinced that he would become Russia's Picasso. But it's unlikely you will have heard of Sergei Yushkevich. At 43, his hair is graying and slightly wispy, and the skin around his eyes is delicately etched with the wrinkles left by a million smiles. He knows he is good at what he does. He wields his brushes and oils with dexterity and skill. But doubts swirl in his soul like snowflakes whipped by the winter wind outside his studio window. Is he an artist?
FEATURES
By Kathy Lally and Kathy Lally,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | June 4, 2001
ST. PETERSBURG, Russia - The iconic moment arrived when Gary Vikan, director of the Walters Art Museum, pulled out a priceless Malevich painting lying all too casually on its side in a metal rack in the basement of the State Russian Museum. Several trustees from the Walters watched in wonder at yet another startling moment in their journey of discovery. They had flown 4,000 miles from Maryland to prepare themselves for two ambitious exhibitions the Walters is planning, one in 2003 devoted to the Russian avant-garde, the other in 2004 to icons.
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Art Critic | January 16, 1994
They're under-priced. They're under-exposed, both here and in their homeland. But some of the world's leading museums are buying them. And now, at last, they've come to Baltimore."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Glenn McNatt | November 5, 2000
Judging from an intriguing new show that opens next week at Evergreen House, the creative dialogue between past and present is as challenging to artists in contemporary Russia as it is to artists here. "Modernism and Post-Modernism: Russian Art of the Ending Millennium," which opens Friday and runs through Jan. 28, is best appreciated as an exploration of the many possible directions contemporary art -- by now a globalized phenomenom -- may take in the future. If a lot of this art looks familiar, it's probably because the 14 Russian contemporary artists represented in the show find themselves confronted with the same uncertain historical moment artists everywhere are facing.
NEWS
May 27, 2011
'Boat Lines and Boat Hulls' An exhibit of abstract maritime photography by Frances Borchardt will be on display through July 4 at the Annapolis Maritime Museum, 723 Second St. All artwork is for sale and part of the proceeds will benefit the museum's education programs. Admission is free. Hours are noon to 4 p.m. Thursday-Sunday. The last day of the show coincides with Annapolis' Fourth of July fireworks display on the Chesapeake Bay. Information: 410-295-0104 or amaritime.org. Art exhibit Main St. Gallery presents recent works in oil by Russian artists Yuri and Victoria Bondarenko.
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