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ENTERTAINMENT
By Glenn McNatt | November 5, 2000
Judging from an intriguing new show that opens next week at Evergreen House, the creative dialogue between past and present is as challenging to artists in contemporary Russia as it is to artists here. "Modernism and Post-Modernism: Russian Art of the Ending Millennium," which opens Friday and runs through Jan. 28, is best appreciated as an exploration of the many possible directions contemporary art -- by now a globalized phenomenom -- may take in the future. If a lot of this art looks familiar, it's probably because the 14 Russian contemporary artists represented in the show find themselves confronted with the same uncertain historical moment artists everywhere are facing.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | December 20, 2011
A bequest from Washington, D.C. arts patron Jean Montgomery Riddell, who died last year at the age of 100, has enriched the holdings of the Walters Art Museum with more than 260 objects of enameled Russian silver from the 17th through early 20th centuries. The Riddell collection includes items from the storied firm of Carl Fabergé. "About 20 years ago, [Riddell] came to the museum and I showed her what we had of Russian works," said William Johnston, senior curator at large and director of the archives at the Walters.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Teara D. Quamina Celtic weekend | February 12, 1998
Russian artIf you love craft work, forget about a pottery wheel -- think lacquer boxes (pictured) instead and head to the Palekh Russian Art Demonstration and Exhibition and broaden your horizons. Explore the world of Palekh art as 17 artists and members of the American-Russian Decorative Arts Exchange demonstrate traditional techniques of egg tempera on papier-mache. View this lacquer miniature art never previously seen outside Russia."The Palekh Russian Artists Demonstration and Exhibition" will be held Sunday from 2 p.m. to 5 p.m. at the Comfort Inn in Springfield, Va. Admission is free.
EXPLORE
By Mike Giuliano | July 18, 2011
Walking down the aisle seems to have been a form of exercise for Marjorie Merriweather Post, who got married four times. An index to changing fashion trends, her wedding dresses are at the heart of the exhibit "Wedding Belles: Bridal Fashions from the Marjorie Merriweather Post Family, 1874-1958. " This compact fashion show offers the perfect excuse to visit Hillwood Estate, Museum and Gardens, the northwest Washington estate that stands as a testament to the cereal heiress' taste.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Douglas Birch and Douglas Birch,Sun Foreign Staff | March 2, 2003
ST. PETERSBURG -- There may be no better place to ponder the riddle of Russia than here, in the Mikhailovsky Palace. This vast chrome-yellow mansion, standing in the center of Russia's cultural capital, is home to the State Russian Museum, which holds the world's largest collection of Russian art. More than most nations, perhaps, Russia is defined by its artists, their lives and their works. In the museum's scores of galleries, visitors can follow much of the drama of Russia's anguished history -- with its spasms of violence and repression -- as well as the bursts of creativity that her tribulations unleashed.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | December 20, 2011
A bequest from Washington, D.C. arts patron Jean Montgomery Riddell, who died last year at the age of 100, has enriched the holdings of the Walters Art Museum with more than 260 objects of enameled Russian silver from the 17th through early 20th centuries. The Riddell collection includes items from the storied firm of Carl Fabergé. "About 20 years ago, [Riddell] came to the museum and I showed her what we had of Russian works," said William Johnston, senior curator at large and director of the archives at the Walters.
FEATURES
By Kathy Lally and Kathy Lally,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | June 4, 2001
ST. PETERSBURG, Russia - The iconic moment arrived when Gary Vikan, director of the Walters Art Museum, pulled out a priceless Malevich painting lying all too casually on its side in a metal rack in the basement of the State Russian Museum. Several trustees from the Walters watched in wonder at yet another startling moment in their journey of discovery. They had flown 4,000 miles from Maryland to prepare themselves for two ambitious exhibitions the Walters is planning, one in 2003 devoted to the Russian avant-garde, the other in 2004 to icons.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Karin Remesch | November 9, 2000
Russian art at Evergreen House "Modernism and Post-Modernism: Russian Art of the Ending Millennium," an exhibit by 14 Russian-born artists, is on view tomorrow through Jan. 28 at Evergreen House, the Johns Hopkins University, 4545 N. Charles St. The paintings reflect the changes and upheavals experienced by Soviet and post-Soviet Russian society in the 20th century. Meet some of the artists at an opening reception from 5:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. tomorrow. The free reception also features a performance at 7 p.m. by Igor Yuzefovich, winner of this year's Marbury Violin Competition at Peabody.
EXPLORE
By Mike Giuliano | July 18, 2011
Walking down the aisle seems to have been a form of exercise for Marjorie Merriweather Post, who got married four times. An index to changing fashion trends, her wedding dresses are at the heart of the exhibit "Wedding Belles: Bridal Fashions from the Marjorie Merriweather Post Family, 1874-1958. " This compact fashion show offers the perfect excuse to visit Hillwood Estate, Museum and Gardens, the northwest Washington estate that stands as a testament to the cereal heiress' taste.
NEWS
By Kathy Lally and Kathy Lally,SUN STAFF | August 1, 1996
MOSCOW -- In a sedate old neighborhood across the Moscow River from the Kremlin lies a many-winged mansion that offers a journey straight to the deepest recesses of the Russian soul.The susceptible heart will be overwhelmed. This is the Tretyakov Gallery, the nation's great repository of Russian art. Touring its 61 halls is far more than an exploration of a collection of 100,000 pieces of art.The Tretyakov propels the visitor through nearly a thousand years of Russian life, straight into the seismic upheavals that created a complex, moody, turbulent nation.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Steven Lee Myers and Steven Lee Myers,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | September 7, 2003
MOSCOW -- It was provocative, as modern art often is. But few of those involved could have foreseen just how provocative it would become when the Sakharov Museum opened an exhibition of paintings and sculptures in January under the title Caution! Religion. Four days after the Jan. 14 opening, six men from a Russian Orthodox church came to the museum's exhibition hall and sacked it, defacing many of the 45 works with spray paint and destroying others. "Sacrilege," one of them scrawled on the wall.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Douglas Birch and Douglas Birch,Sun Foreign Staff | March 2, 2003
ST. PETERSBURG -- There may be no better place to ponder the riddle of Russia than here, in the Mikhailovsky Palace. This vast chrome-yellow mansion, standing in the center of Russia's cultural capital, is home to the State Russian Museum, which holds the world's largest collection of Russian art. More than most nations, perhaps, Russia is defined by its artists, their lives and their works. In the museum's scores of galleries, visitors can follow much of the drama of Russia's anguished history -- with its spasms of violence and repression -- as well as the bursts of creativity that her tribulations unleashed.
FEATURES
By Kathy Lally and Kathy Lally,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | June 4, 2001
ST. PETERSBURG, Russia - The iconic moment arrived when Gary Vikan, director of the Walters Art Museum, pulled out a priceless Malevich painting lying all too casually on its side in a metal rack in the basement of the State Russian Museum. Several trustees from the Walters watched in wonder at yet another startling moment in their journey of discovery. They had flown 4,000 miles from Maryland to prepare themselves for two ambitious exhibitions the Walters is planning, one in 2003 devoted to the Russian avant-garde, the other in 2004 to icons.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Karin Remesch | November 9, 2000
Russian art at Evergreen House "Modernism and Post-Modernism: Russian Art of the Ending Millennium," an exhibit by 14 Russian-born artists, is on view tomorrow through Jan. 28 at Evergreen House, the Johns Hopkins University, 4545 N. Charles St. The paintings reflect the changes and upheavals experienced by Soviet and post-Soviet Russian society in the 20th century. Meet some of the artists at an opening reception from 5:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. tomorrow. The free reception also features a performance at 7 p.m. by Igor Yuzefovich, winner of this year's Marbury Violin Competition at Peabody.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Glenn McNatt | November 5, 2000
Judging from an intriguing new show that opens next week at Evergreen House, the creative dialogue between past and present is as challenging to artists in contemporary Russia as it is to artists here. "Modernism and Post-Modernism: Russian Art of the Ending Millennium," which opens Friday and runs through Jan. 28, is best appreciated as an exploration of the many possible directions contemporary art -- by now a globalized phenomenom -- may take in the future. If a lot of this art looks familiar, it's probably because the 14 Russian contemporary artists represented in the show find themselves confronted with the same uncertain historical moment artists everywhere are facing.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Teara D. Quamina Celtic weekend | February 12, 1998
Russian artIf you love craft work, forget about a pottery wheel -- think lacquer boxes (pictured) instead and head to the Palekh Russian Art Demonstration and Exhibition and broaden your horizons. Explore the world of Palekh art as 17 artists and members of the American-Russian Decorative Arts Exchange demonstrate traditional techniques of egg tempera on papier-mache. View this lacquer miniature art never previously seen outside Russia."The Palekh Russian Artists Demonstration and Exhibition" will be held Sunday from 2 p.m. to 5 p.m. at the Comfort Inn in Springfield, Va. Admission is free.
NEWS
By KNIGHT-RIDDER NEWS SERVICE | October 2, 1997
WASHINGTON - A glittering exhibit of the riches of the Russian royal family, the Romanovs, is scheduled to open next year in Wilmington, Del.Promoters are promising no repeat of Washington's experience with Russian art, in which an exhibition of Romanov jewels and art objects at the Corcoran Gallery of Art this spring triggered a dispute that resulted in a blockade of the moving van taking the display to its next venue."
NEWS
October 3, 1990
WESTMINSTER - The artwork of more than 30 children from Leningrad will be displayed at the Carroll County Public Library during October.The young Russian artists, ranging in age from 6 to 17, display works that include interpretations of fairy tales, pencil drawings, watercolors and block prints.School teacher Ruth Aukerman is coordinating the display. She got the art from Yuri Reshkin, a painter who spent 30 years as art education supervisor in Leningrad.Information: 848-4250.
NEWS
By KNIGHT-RIDDER NEWS SERVICE | October 2, 1997
WASHINGTON - A glittering exhibit of the riches of the Russian royal family, the Romanovs, is scheduled to open next year in Wilmington, Del.Promoters are promising no repeat of Washington's experience with Russian art, in which an exhibition of Romanov jewels and art objects at the Corcoran Gallery of Art this spring triggered a dispute that resulted in a blockade of the moving van taking the display to its next venue."
NEWS
By Kathy Lally and Kathy Lally,SUN STAFF | August 1, 1996
MOSCOW -- In a sedate old neighborhood across the Moscow River from the Kremlin lies a many-winged mansion that offers a journey straight to the deepest recesses of the Russian soul.The susceptible heart will be overwhelmed. This is the Tretyakov Gallery, the nation's great repository of Russian art. Touring its 61 halls is far more than an exploration of a collection of 100,000 pieces of art.The Tretyakov propels the visitor through nearly a thousand years of Russian life, straight into the seismic upheavals that created a complex, moody, turbulent nation.
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