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By Chicago Tribune | July 6, 1993
MOSCOW -- When Sasha entered the hospital for tests a few weeks back, he already knew what the diagnosis would be. His parents had bribed the doctor to "discover" a stomach ulcer.Sasha, 17, has received his draft notice and is scheduled to report for duty soon. But the hospital certificate, which cost his parents several months' pay, should get him a deferment."All my friends are doing stuff like this to stay out of the army. Only kids with no money and no connections get drafted these days," said Sasha, who asked that his last name not be used.
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By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | December 16, 2012
Abram, his wife, Bessie, and his teenage brother Sam came first, traveling by train from their Russian village to a German port a thousand miles away in 1912. Then they boarded the ship that would bring them to their new home - Baltimore. The brothers, tailors by trade, mailed packages back to their densely wooded village - coats with bills sewn into the linings, shoes with coins hammered into the soles - to help their siblings and parents pay for the voyage. After 14 years, all eight siblings and their parents - Chaim and Suhra - were reunited in Baltimore.
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By Kathy Lally and Kathy Lally,Moscow Bureau of The Sun | January 15, 1995
MOSCOW -- The military debacle in Chechnya has forced Russians to the devastating conclusion that their army is in serious disarray, undisciplined, poorly trained and ill-equipped.The army's ignominious performance has exposed Russia's ultimate military secret, experienced officers and others say: A decay that set in more than 30 years ago has severely debilitated the nation's defenses."The army has disintegrated," said Yuri I. Deryugin, a retired colonel and military sociologist. "The army that won World War II, that strong army, only existed until 1957.
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By Douglas Birch and Douglas Birch,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | September 22, 2004
MOSCOW - Amid rising ethnic tensions in the north Caucasus, thousands of protestors took to the streets of Grozny, the Chechan capital, yesterday to protest the proposed pardon of a Russian army colonel who murdered a teenage Chechen girl. Students and teachers from Chechen State University and other campuses marched and held signs demanding that Col. Yuri Budanov serve the 10-year jail term handed down by a court last year. Hundreds of police surrounded the demonstrators in Grozny's war-ravaged center, Russian television showed, but made no effort to interfere.
NEWS
By Kathy Lally and Kathy Lally,Moscow Bureau of The Sun | September 1, 1994
RIGA, Latvia -- The Russian army, which swept over the Baltics with the roar of tanks 54 years ago, left quietly yesterday, rumbling out of Latvia on a woebegone train that carried the tattered remains of fallen empire.For the Baltic nations, a long foreign occupation had finally ended. The day was historic, but oddly empty of jubilation. For most Latvians, Estonians and Lithuanians, the occupation was so painful that relief held sway over joy as it ended.In Germany yesterday, the departing Russian troops managed to march off with verve and honor.
NEWS
By DAN BERGER | February 17, 1992
Tsongas is laughing all the way to the White House.Some economists see light at the end of the tunnel. Those are the ones with tunnel vision.Yeltsin offers the other republics a choice. They can have a Russian army, or a Russian army.The Navy likes closing ports so much it is building five new ones to close later on.If the city didn't spend $360,000 for electronic message signs near the stadium, how would visitors find out that this is the city that reads?
NEWS
By DAN BERGER | January 10, 1995
The dead not only vote; they answer the phone.If the Russian army has this much trouble in Grozny, it is hardly in shape to take Moscow.Remember when Yeltsin was a reformer?The Chinese government is getting more antsy about dissidents than ever, in case you were wondering about the state of Citizen Deng's health.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | June 2, 1995
MOSCOW -- Russia's most charismatic general, Lt. Gen. Alexander I. Lebed, has resigned his army command to protest Kremlin policies and is widely believed to be preparing to run for political office -- possibly challenging President Boris N. Yeltsin in 1996.Defense Minister Pavel S. Grachev approved General Lebed's letter of resignation yesterday. It is now up to Mr. Yeltsin to decide whether the 45-year-old war hero poses more of a threat from his post as commander of the 14th Army in Trans-Dniester or from outside the army as a political rival.
NEWS
By Will Englund and Will Englund,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | February 16, 2000
MOSCOW -- With a war on in Chechnya, the Russian army has been enjoying unparalleled influence within the government, but now Vladimir V. Putin has reminded his generals who's boss. The acting president -- and one-time chief spy -- has put units of the Federal Security Service back to work within the Russian military to keep an eye on its officers and men. In a decree signed over the weekend, Putin re-established the "special departments" of Soviet times, made up of untouchable counterintelligence officers whose main job is to seek out and expose any political disloyalty.
NEWS
By Scott Shane and Scott Shane,Moscow Bureau of The Sun | January 16, 1991
MOSCOW -- President Mikhail S. Gorbachev moved to ease Western fears for the future of the Soviet Union's foreign policy yesterday by naming liberal Americanologist Alexander Bessmertnykh as foreign minister.At the same time he continued his intermittent war against Boris N. Yeltsin by condemning the Russian Federation leader for proposing the creation of a Russian army, separate from the Soviet army."I think it's a gross violation of the constitution of the U.S.S.R. -- just the very fact of the proposal," an angry Mr. Gorbachev told the Soviet parliament.
NEWS
By Adam Lisberg and Adam Lisberg,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | May 9, 2002
BERGEN COUNTY, N.J. - They fought for a nation that no longer exists, a nation that turned its back on their sacrifices. As young men, they paid a horrible price to save their country and their people; as old men, they fled that country carrying suitcases and memories. Had they stayed in Russia they would at least have Victory Day - May 9, the day the Russians celebrate to mark the end of World War II in Europe - when old men parade through the streets in their uniforms, chests puffed with pride and festooned with medals.
NEWS
By Will Englund and Will Englund,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | December 6, 2000
MOSCOW - The old Soviet anthem looked forward to a brighter future, but now that President Vladimir V. Putin wants to revive it, that's got everyone here thinking about the past. Josef Stalin liked it - in fact, he selected it. Does that make it bad? If you associate the song with Stalin, most people here would say, yes, that's a problem. But if you associate it with your parents' generation and all that it accomplished, well, that's not so troubling. The song, said Russian Patriarch Alexy II, stands for "continuity with the Soviet era, which, of course, was a terrible tragedy, but during which there was a lot of good."
NEWS
By Will Englund and Will Englund,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | April 30, 2000
MOSCOW -- Suddenly, spring has broken out here, as it does only in Russia, with weeks and weeks of pent-up expectation finally giving way in all places at once, with flowers and verdant grasses and green growth erupting everywhere, with darkness in full retreat before ever-lengthening hours of daylight, with sunbathers and lovers on every bench. Just in time, Russians have before them the chance to celebrate not one, not two -- but six holidays between now and May 9. Head to the dacha, head to the lake, head to the park; turn the soil, plant potatoes, fix the car. Forget about work -- just forget about it. But one thing, please: no more ideology.
NEWS
By Will Englund and Will Englund,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | February 16, 2000
MOSCOW -- With a war on in Chechnya, the Russian army has been enjoying unparalleled influence within the government, but now Vladimir V. Putin has reminded his generals who's boss. The acting president -- and one-time chief spy -- has put units of the Federal Security Service back to work within the Russian military to keep an eye on its officers and men. In a decree signed over the weekend, Putin re-established the "special departments" of Soviet times, made up of untouchable counterintelligence officers whose main job is to seek out and expose any political disloyalty.
NEWS
By Will Englund and Will Englund,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | October 22, 1999
MOSCOW -- At least 10 rockets slammed into Grozny, the Chechen capital, last night, devastating an open-air market and a maternity hospital. A Chechen official said 118 people were killed and up to 400 wounded. News agency correspondents said they saw dozens of bodies.The Russian military denied responsibility for the barrage.The explosions caused panic in a city still in ruins from the Russian assaults of the 1994-1996 war. Roads were reported jammed with people trying to flee what they expect to be an imminent Russian invasion.
NEWS
By Kathy Lally and Kathy Lally,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | May 5, 1999
MOSCOW -- When his mother heard that Sergei Leontyev, a 19-year-old draftee in the Russian army, was being held as a slave in Chechnya, she was overcome by despair.Irina Leontyeva, a poverty-stricken woman living in a small Russian village, thought there was no way out for her son -- she could never find the thousands of dollars in ransom that bandits in the breakaway republic of Chechnya routinely demand.Then, amazingly, salvation beckoned. A prosecutor in St. Petersburg decided that evidence was weak against a 31-year-old Chechen man who had been imprisoned for eight months awaiting trial on charges of kidnapping and extortion.
NEWS
By Kathy Lally and Kathy Lally,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | May 5, 1999
MOSCOW -- When his mother heard that Sergei Leontyev, a 19-year-old draftee in the Russian army, was being held as a slave in Chechnya, she was overcome by despair.Irina Leontyeva, a poverty-stricken woman living in a small Russian village, thought there was no way out for her son -- she could never find the thousands of dollars in ransom that bandits in the breakaway republic of Chechnya routinely demand.Then, amazingly, salvation beckoned. A prosecutor in St. Petersburg decided that evidence was weak against a 31-year-old Chechen man who had been imprisoned for eight months awaiting trial on charges of kidnapping and extortion.
NEWS
By Will Englund and Will Englund,Moscow Bureau of The Sun | December 11, 1991
MOSCOW -- The squad trudged in formation in the afternoon darkness yesterday alongside Moscow's Marshal Zhukov Prospekt.It was a familiar sight here. They were hard, laconic young men from Uzbekistan, Kazakhstan, Tadzhikistan and Russia, draftees, 10 cogs in the one great institution that still transcends republic borders: the Soviet army.The army hasn't been heard from since Russia, Ukraine and Byelarus declared a new commonwealth Sunday to replace the Soviet Union.Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev asserted himself in his role as commander in chief yesterday, meeting with top officers at the Defense Ministry.
NEWS
By Kathy Lally and Kathy Lally,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | February 8, 1998
VOLGOGRAD, Russia -- She stands 173 feet tall, sword heroically upraised, a powerful, protective and vengeful mother. The great statue looms above the city, exalting Russia and the valor of its soldiers.Far below, another mother walks the city in sorrow, calling that army shameful and dissolute.Galina Alexeyevna Kaloshina is slight and worn but just as unyielding as the concrete and metal figure above. Like the monumental Mother Russia, Kaloshina exists for one reason: so that a dead soldier will not be forgotten.
NEWS
May 23, 1997
WHY SHOULD Americans care about the latest shake-up in Russia's military? Because Russia, despite declining global status and internal troubles, still has massive nuclear capacity.President Boris N. Yeltsin's decision to fire Defense Minister Igor Rodionov and the head of the general staff, Gen. Viktor Samsonov, was based on his unhappiness with their slow progress in downsizing the 1.7-million strong military. "I am not just unsatisfied, I am outraged by the course of reform in the army and the state of the military altogether," Mr. Yeltsin thundered on television.
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