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NEWS
December 5, 2009
MOSCOW - An explosion apparently caused by pyrotechnics tore through a nightclub in the Russian city of Perm early Saturday, killing more than 100 people, according to emergency officials quoted by state television. It was not immediately clear if the pyrotechnics were kept in storage at the club or being used as part of a show like in the fire that killed 100 people at a rock club in Rhode Island in 2003. In the chaotic aftermath of the blast and subsequent fire, casualty figures differed.
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NEWS
By Jerome Israel | August 19, 2014
The U.S. needs Russia. This may sound peculiar coming from a person who spent 25 years at the NSA, almost half of those fighting communism. But our approach to Russia since the end of the Cold War has been unimaginative and aggressive. Politicians in Washington put on their Cold-War glasses any time Russia makes noise. It's time to archive those in the Smithsonian. Many notable academics agree that our policies toward Russia are flawed, but my conclusion - that we need Russia - is derived from the kind of work we mastered at NSA: carefully listening to and analyzing communications, in this case what Russians have said openly on social networks and in private conversations with me during a recent trip to Russia.
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NEWS
August 28, 2011
I read with dismay that the Russian spacecraft that was to supply provisions for the International Space Station, where two American astronauts are housed, burnt up in the atmosphere while our own shuttle program at NASA was recently mothballed. I heard with concern on a news program on WYPR that we don't make crucial medications in this country anymore, and thus depend on China, India and others to do it for us. The same program also mentioned that there are crucial shortages of these lifesaving medications.
NEWS
April 9, 2014
The new Ukrainian government in Kiev is under mounting pressure to keep the country from unraveling as pro-Russian demonstrators in Kharkiv, Donetsk, Lugansk and other eastern cities occupy government buildings and demand to be reunited with Moscow. Whether or not this is prelude to a replay of Russia's lightning takeover of the Crimea last month, President Barack Obama and European leaders must make absolutely clear to Russian President Vladimir Putin that his country will pay a heavy price for any attempt to change the map of Europe again by force.
NEWS
By Georgie Anne Geyer | November 4, 1994
Washington -- TWO RUSSIAN leaders now engage our attention. One, because we think we know him well -- but don't. The other, because we do not know him at all -- but soon will.First, the well-known one, Boris Yeltsin. The predominant view of the Clinton administration is that Mr. Yeltsin is at least close to creating a real democrat, and that our interests are well served by his longevity. He will be in power a long time, they persist in saying.But behind what seems more and more to be a Potemkin facade, a new Boris Yeltsin is emerging in the eyes of the people who know him best.
NEWS
By Will Englund and Will Englund,Moscow Bureau of The Sun | December 18, 1994
MOSCOW -- Chechen fighters contemptuously spurned an ultimatum by Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin to lay down their arms as of midnight last night, but the Russian government vowed again to crush resistance there.Shortly after the deadline passed, artillery shells were fired into an area north of Grozny, the Chechen capital. But it was impossible to know who had fired the salvos, or to identify the intended target, the Russian Itar-Tass news agency reported.Russian warplanes also buzzed Grozny after the deadline, and explosions were heard northwest of the city, the Associated Press reported from the capital.
NEWS
By excerpted by Will Englund and excerpted by Will Englund,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | August 22, 2000
In the nine days between the sinking of the Russian nuclear submarine Kursk -- on Aug. 12 -- and Norwegian divers yesterday opening the vessel and determining the crew could not have survived, the Russian press has become steadily more critical of the Ministry of Defense and President Vladimir V. Putin. What follows is a sampling of recent commentary in Russian newspapers and magazines, excerpted by Will Englund of The Sun's Moscow Bureau and by the bureau staff. It's no sin to be poor, but abject poverty means damnation It appears that the list of suggested causes of the Kursk nuclear submarine's sinking has by now been finally exhausted.
NEWS
July 13, 1994
Ever since the collapse of the Soviet Union, author Alexander Solzhenitsyn has been preaching a "Russian Union" of Russia, Ukraine, Belarus and Kazakhstan. That dream may come closer to realization now that Ukraine and Belarus have elected presidents who advocate closer ties with Moscow.This is a welcome development to those who favor Slavic cooperation under the Commonwealth of Independent States. But many Ukrainian and Belarusan nationalists see the outcome as a disaster. They fear an embrace by the Russian bear may suffocate their countries' fledgling freedom.
FEATURES
By ROB KASPER | February 26, 1995
I got a taste of Russia recently in Reisterstown. It was in Babushka Deli, a small store filled with American flags and Russian foodstuffs. I found the deli near a bowling alley, Bowl America, in a shopping center on Reisterstown Road just north of Franklin Boulevard.I ate a fistful of salami on a couple of slices of dense rye bread topped with pungent pickles. This was a sandwich made to chew. It was my idea of lunch.Throughout the store were handwritten signs, some in English, some in Russian, touting the whiting, the Russian "ravioly" and the Mad Ludwig, a sandwich made of smooth liverwurst, Swiss cheese, raw onion and pickle.
NEWS
October 26, 1992
In an ominous replay of the bad old days, Russian security agents have swooped in and arrested three Moscow scientists and charged one of them with revealing state secrets to a reporter for The Sun and to a Moscow newspaper. The alleged crime: Blowing the whistle on clandestine Russian research to develop a nerve gas even more lethal that those in existing superpower stockpiles.This is an embarrassment for the Russian government and perhaps an unwelcome complication for the Bush administration.
NEWS
By Nilay Saiya | April 7, 2014
The White House has responded to Russian actions in Crimea by taking a number of steps against Moscow: It has ramped up sanctions, verbally denounced the Kremlin's flouting of international law, effectively kicked Russia out of the G8 and given rhetorical support to Ukraine's new government. Such measures, however, are likely to deepen and prolong the crisis, not resolve it. The conventional view in Washington is that Russian President Vladimir Putin is a belligerent authoritarian intent upon expanding Russia's borders and confronting the West.
NEWS
By David Horsey | April 1, 2014
Vladimir Putin has been kicked out of an exclusive club, but he may not even care. Last month, meeting in The Hague, leaders from seven of the world's biggest economic powers agreed to blackball Mr. Putin's Russia, reducing the G8 to the G7. They ratified the decision to move the group's upcoming annual world economic summit to Brussels, taking away from Mr. Putin the chance to host the event in Sochi, site of his recent successful Winter Olympic...
NEWS
By Jim Rosapepe | March 27, 2014
'I told you so.' That's what I'm sure most of my Romanian friends would tell me about Russia's heavy handed assault on Ukraine - if they weren't so polite. Almost from the day I arrived in Bucharest in February 1998 (when Boris Yeltsin, not Vladimir Putin, was President of Russia), Romanians tried to convince me that the U.S. was naive about Russia. There was - and is - plenty of evidence to support their view. I remember particularly a Saturday in June 1999 as the war in Kosovo was ending.
NEWS
By Cal Thomas | March 22, 2014
What is it about Western leaders from Neville Chamberlain to George W. Bush who want to find good in men of bad character? Acting as if he were endowed by special insight bestowed upon no one else, President George W. Bush declared in 2001 that he had looked Vladimir Putin in the eye and "was able to get a sense of his soul. " According to the Daily Caller.com, in a 2010 interview with talk radio host Hugh Hewitt, Mr. Bush, who was promoting his book "Decision Points," was asked about his ability to see into the souls of men. The former president explained, "The reason why I said that is because I remembered him talking movingly about his mother and the cross that she gave him that she said she had blessed in Jerusalem.
NEWS
By Steve Phillips | March 20, 2014
President Barack Obama came into office promising to limit United States commitments abroad in order to focus on the economy and health care at home. Such an approach may have been prudent immediately after the excesses of the Bush administration, but strong measures are needed now to confront the crisis in Ukraine. During the past few weeks, political instability in Ukraine led to the resignation and flight of the pro-Russian president. Russia responded by invading part of Ukraine, Crimea, then engineering a vote for independence in that region.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | March 8, 2014
Russian repertoire was so prevalent and played so passionately during Yuri Temirkanov's tenure at the helm of the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra that it seemed to some people that there was no point in touching such music again. I confess I entertained that notion myself for a little while. The tendency to romanticize the Temrikanov years is absolutely understandable, but not all that productive. The world goes on. So does the music. And it sure went on stirringly Friday night at Meyerhoff Hall.
NEWS
December 16, 1993
Vice President Al Gore's denunciation yesterday of the Russian neo-fascist, Vladimir Zhirinovsky, had a harsh, blunt, uncompromising quality that was needed to express American revulsion to the racism, anti-Semitism, militarism and ultra-nationalism that comes out of the mouth of this new demagogue on the Moscow scene.In describing Mr. Zhirinovsky, views as "reprehensible and anathema to all freedom-loving peoples," the vice president was speaking not only for his countrymen. His words were bound to resonate passionately among the Poles, Ukrainians, Lithuanians and all others Mr. Zhirinovsky, would threaten through a return to Russian expansionism.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | June 17, 1995
BUDYONNOVSK, Russia -- Russian troops today stormed a hospital where Chechen rebels had taken up to 2,000 people hostage, freeing at least 60, but the rebels put up a ferocious defense, officials and media reports said.Heavily armed commandos swarmed the building in this southern Russian town while firing automatic weapons, and Russian military helicopters and tanks joined the attack after heavy fighting erupted.News media reports said the rebels holed up in the hospital were firing back with automatic weapons and using their captives as human shields.
NEWS
March 3, 2014
The seizure of the Crimea region of southern Ukraine by Russian troops over the weekend has created the most serious crisis in Europe since Moscow's 2008 incursion into Georgia, which led to the effective dismemberment and annexation of parts of that former Soviet republic. President Barack Obama was right to warn Russian president Vladimir Putin that his country will pay a price for attempting a similar territorial grab in Ukraine, but in order to make that threat credible he must use all the diplomatic tools at his disposal to convince America's European allies to speak with one voice in condemning Russia's dangerous military adventurism and flagrant violation of international norms while avoiding an escalation of the crisis that could lead to armed conflict.
NEWS
March 3, 2014
I can not agree with the recent letters to The Sun written about the unrest in Ukraine. Although the U.S. has current economic problems, our nation has always shown the resiliency to overcome them in the long run, fueled by a democratic, capitalistic and innovative society ( "Ukraine not unlike the U.S.," Feb. 27). This, unfortunately, is not characteristic of the Ukraine, formerly part of the communist Soviet Union. As for the writer who insists that Russia has every right to claim interference with its sphere of influence ( "The U.S. should speak softly on Ukraine," Feb. 27)
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