Advertisement
HomeCollectionsRussia
IN THE NEWS

Russia

FIND MORE STORIES ABOUT:
FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
March 8, 2014
Remember when former GOP presidential candidate Mitt Romney said that Russia was our number one "geopolitical foe" in the world, and that it was bent on expanding its dominance? He was mocked by President Obama and MSNBC. But now it looks like he was right on the money. Benedict Frederick Jr., Pasadena - To respond to this letter, send an email to talkback@baltimoresun.com . Please include your name and contact information.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
September 3, 2014
In the wake of Russia's increasingly belligerent behavior in Ukraine, President Barack Obama delivered a ringing declaration of NATO's support for the Baltic countries Wednesday in the capital of Estonia, a former Soviet Republic and current NATO member that also has reason to fear Russian aggression. Mr. Obama vowed the U.S. and NATO would honor the alliance's pledge of collective defense and back it up with a beefed-up troop presence and air patrols. He also pointed to NATO's decision to create a rapid reaction force and pre-positioning of military equipment in the region as evidence of the alliance's resolve to defend its members.
Advertisement
NEWS
May 29, 1994
In his 18 years as a reclusive writer in Cavendish, Vt., Alexander Solzhenitsyn created an ideal Russia. It existed in his mind, within the walls of his household and in the forests of birch trees, which had the same sun and blue sky that on good days can be seen in Russia.He saw few visitors besides his family, had virtually no contact with the outside world. Instead, he applied the grueling self-discipline he adopted during his years in Stalin's gulags.He got up at 6 every morning and spent the rest of the day writing, completing "The Red Wheel," his four-volume history of events leading to the 1917 Russian Revolution.
NEWS
August 26, 2014
I enjoyed reading and agree with Jerome Israel's commentary "The U.S. needs Russia" (Aug. 23) At a time when the entire Middle East is in chaos and aflame, it seems strange that U.S. leaders would pick a fight with Russia over Ukraine that could lead to another world war. We need to put our feet in the shoes of the Russians in order to realize why they are so upset. NATO has adopted a very aggressive stance toward Russia ever since the fall of the Berlin Wall. The alliance, which should have been disbanded in 1989, has marched relentlessly eastward, absorbing former Soviet satellites.
NEWS
By William Pfaff | January 25, 1996
PARIS -- Russia has a colonial problem. It continues to deal with that problem in ignorance or indifference to the modern history of colonial problems -- including its own, in Afghanistan.Afghanistan was indirectly a colony after the Communist coup in that country in 1978, and the Soviet military intervention which followed a year later. The Soviet army's subsequent unsuccessful war with nationalist and religious Afghan insurgents contributed -- perhaps decisively -- to the collapse of the Soviet system.
NEWS
August 1, 2013
I can't believe The Sun published a picture of the women's rights group Femen with a caption locating the city of Kiev in Russia ("News Briefing," July 29). To my knowledge Kiev has been, and still is, in Ukraine. If your newspaper cannot print correct information, you shouldn't print anything at all. From now on, any information printed in this newspaper I cannot believe to be truthful. Lydia Sushko-Teluk
NEWS
August 25, 1999
Here is an excerpt of an editorial from the Los Angeles Times, which was published Sunday.THE DATE to watch in Russia is Dec. 18. That's when voters will choose the 450 members of the Duma, the lower house of parliament, a choice that could do much to shape their country's future, including its relations with the West.With Boris N. Yeltsin's presidency a shambles and the Duma dominated by the naysaying Communist Party and its allies, Russians growing ever more desperate for better lives appear ready for change.
NEWS
December 7, 1994
The East-West disputes erupting at the Conference on Security and Cooperation in Europe (CSCE) in Budapest provide the best justification yet for having the CSCE. If those disputes exist, they cry out for a forum in which to be addressed.CSCE was born in 1975, proposed by the Soviet Union to get the West to ratify the borders of sovereignty and hegemony in Eastern Europe. The West saw it as a way to pry the lid off human rights abuses in Communist countries. That seems so long ago. Now CSCE is a large tent for all the European countries (plus the U.S.)
ENTERTAINMENT
By John Dorsey | November 2, 1995
"Layers," opening tomorrow at the University of Maryland Baltimore County, is an exhibit of contemporary collage by six artists from St. Petersburg, Russia. Alla Efimova, who curated the show, explains that in post-communist Russia, history is constantly being revised and discredited, and mental disturbance is widespread. Collage, in which images are formed from bits and pieces gathered from many places, is an appropriate art form for artists living in a society currently so fragmented. On Saturday beginning at 10 a.m., there will be a free public symposium in conjunction with the exhibit called "Collage and Post-Communist Madness."
NEWS
December 9, 2003
WHEN ARE ELECTIONS bad for democracy? When they're held the way Russia just held its nationwide vote for a new parliament. Candidates who opposed the Kremlin's puppet party, United Russia, were tossed off the ballot. Campaign literature was confiscated. Television and the press relentlessly favored United Russia, and ignored the other parties. On Sunday, the day of the vote, there were local pockets of outright fraud. With turnout fairly low, United Russia and allied parties emerged as big winners.
NEWS
By Jerome Israel | August 19, 2014
The U.S. needs Russia. This may sound peculiar coming from a person who spent 25 years at the NSA, almost half of those fighting communism. But our approach to Russia since the end of the Cold War has been unimaginative and aggressive. Politicians in Washington put on their Cold-War glasses any time Russia makes noise. It's time to archive those in the Smithsonian. Many notable academics agree that our policies toward Russia are flawed, but my conclusion - that we need Russia - is derived from the kind of work we mastered at NSA: carefully listening to and analyzing communications, in this case what Russians have said openly on social networks and in private conversations with me during a recent trip to Russia.
NEWS
August 2, 2014
Politicians and pundits are often blind to the political effects of sanctions ( "Standing up to Moscow," July 29). But history shows that placing sanctions on Russia is likely to backfire. After the first round of sanctions, Russian President Vladimir Putin's approval rating skyrocketed to a record 83 percent. Thanks to the U.S., the Moscovian menace can now use sanctions to unite Russians against the West and rally support to his side. Moreover, sanctions increase the likelihood of forceful retaliation in 95 percent of instances because leaders tend to escalate conflicts to save their own and their country's reputation.
NEWS
July 29, 2014
After months of resisting U.S. calls for tougher economic sanctions against Russia in response to its support for separatist rebels in Ukraine, the major European powers agreed yesterday on a package of measures targeting Russia's financial, energy and military sectors that in some cases go even farther than the actions the U.S. itself has taken. Whether that will be enough to alter Russian President Vladimir Putin's calculations in the covert war he is waging in Ukraine remains to be seen.
NEWS
By Kathleen J. Smith | May 1, 2014
Russia annexed Ukraine's southern Crimea region, despite the fact that a significant minority of the Crimean population are not ethnically Russian nor interested in joining the Russian Federation. Approximately 12 percent of the Crimean population - over 250,000 people - are ethnically "Tatar," a largely pro-Ukrainian, Sunni Muslim group. They have an embattled history with Russia. In 1944, Stalin exiled the Tatar population to Central Asia, and over half of the population died in the forced migration.
NEWS
April 16, 2014
With Russian troops amassed along its border and Kremlin-backed separatists in control of major cities in eastern Ukraine, the government in Kiev is facing the gravest threat to its survival since the breakup of the former Soviet Union a generation ago. Unless the U.S. and its allies can convince Russian President Vladimir Putin to step back from using the unrest there as a pretext for military intervention, it looks more likely than ever that eastern...
NEWS
By Debbie McFadden | April 7, 2014
My daughter, Tatyana McFadden, was born with a disability - an underdeveloped spinal cord that resulted in paralysis below her waist - in St. Petersburg, Russia. She fought for her life then, and later, with the same determination, for her right to compete in athletics. Now, we are fighting for the rights of others around the world. My daughter Tatyana McFadden is a world-champion athlete. She is the only person - man or woman, disabled or not - to win four premier marathon races in one year.
NEWS
By William Pfaff | October 2, 1995
MOSCOW -- A series of conversations with Russian intellectuals, concerned to discuss their own country's past as well as its future, has left this writer convinced that the inner landscape of Russia today, in the aftermath of Communism's collapse and the disintegration of the Soviet Union, is more fearful than the outer landscape of economics, politics, elections and geopolitics.There is very deep pessimism, but also there seems to be apathy, or resignation, in anticipation of still more catastrophic events as consequence -- but also eventual resolution -- of Russia's crisis.
NEWS
January 5, 1992
Russia's plunge into price reform begins a shock treatment without anesthesia. The unanswered question is: Will the patient walk again? But President Boris N. Yeltsin showed commendable decisiveness by not just talking about price reform and vacillating as Mikhail S. Gorbachev did for years.If handling finances was so easy, everyone would be a millionaire. Yet many individuals, and even countries, barely survive from paycheck to paycheck. Few universal panaceas exist to complicated monetary problems.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | March 28, 2014
Russian President Vladimir Putin's land grab of Crimea, with more threatened to come, has Republican neoconservatives eagerly lining up to denounce President Obama as a deplorably weak leader who settled for throwing snowballs at Putin rather than military muscle. Former Sen. Rick Santorum of Pennsylvania, laboring to keep his presidential aspirations flickering after a brief day in the sun in the 2012 Republican primaries, has temporarily doffed his anti-abortion hat to get in front of the parade.
NEWS
By Jim Rosapepe | March 27, 2014
'I told you so.' That's what I'm sure most of my Romanian friends would tell me about Russia's heavy handed assault on Ukraine - if they weren't so polite. Almost from the day I arrived in Bucharest in February 1998 (when Boris Yeltsin, not Vladimir Putin, was President of Russia), Romanians tried to convince me that the U.S. was naive about Russia. There was - and is - plenty of evidence to support their view. I remember particularly a Saturday in June 1999 as the war in Kosovo was ending.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.