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June 17, 2008
A political candidate I was interviewing last year turned the tables on me and asked me why I got into journalism. I said that from the earliest I could remember, I just liked telling people stuff - an answer that drew much merriment from the candidate's aide, imagining my 5-year-old self quoting sources in the kitchen on what was for dinner that night. Well, yeah. Who doesn't want to be the first to not just know but also tell? I'm going to miss that glint in Tim Russert's eye. On countless election nights, the anchor would "toss" to him, as the TV guys say, the camera would swivel to his side of the desk, and there would be Russert, fairly thrumming with what he was about to tell.
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FEATURES
By Susan Reimer | June 24, 2008
It didn't take the bad guys long. It was only minutes after Tim Russert's death was announced that someone apparently posted something so unpleasant on The New York Times' Web site that it was taken down almost immediately by somebody in the control room. I didn't see what was said, but some of those who posted afterward did, and they were outraged. By last Monday, pundits and bloggers were criticizing Russert's shocked and sad colleagues at NBC for their "overblown, self-congratulatory and self-indulgent" coverage of his death.
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FEATURES
By Susan Reimer | June 24, 2008
It didn't take the bad guys long. It was only minutes after Tim Russert's death was announced that someone apparently posted something so unpleasant on The New York Times' Web site that it was taken down almost immediately by somebody in the control room. I didn't see what was said, but some of those who posted afterward did, and they were outraged. By last Monday, pundits and bloggers were criticizing Russert's shocked and sad colleagues at NBC for their "overblown, self-congratulatory and self-indulgent" coverage of his death.
NEWS
By C. Fraser Smith | June 22, 2008
He was an unlikely media star, a rumpled, Columbo-like character out of The Front Page. That appearance made him a throwback in the unsettling transition from print to electronic to cyber communication. In an earlier time, the stereotype demanded a fedora with a "PRESS" card tucked under the band. But he was a hack with a TV profile. He was more than a dogged reporter. He was an exemplar of media power. His face and his Sunday morning presence sold his books with Oprah-like power. The Tim Russert story - the story of his life and of his sudden passing - commanded headlines the way presidents and their passing do. The continuing accounts of his life are reminiscent of the Princess Diana story and its painful grip on the world's attention.
NEWS
By C. Fraser Smith | June 22, 2008
He was an unlikely media star, a rumpled, Columbo-like character out of The Front Page. That appearance made him a throwback in the unsettling transition from print to electronic to cyber communication. In an earlier time, the stereotype demanded a fedora with a "PRESS" card tucked under the band. But he was a hack with a TV profile. He was more than a dogged reporter. He was an exemplar of media power. His face and his Sunday morning presence sold his books with Oprah-like power. The Tim Russert story - the story of his life and of his sudden passing - commanded headlines the way presidents and their passing do. The continuing accounts of his life are reminiscent of the Princess Diana story and its painful grip on the world's attention.
FEATURES
January 1, 2003
Tim Russert, host of NBC's Meet the Press, has agreed to terms with Miramax Books for a memoir about "fathers and sons." Russert's representative, Washington attorney Bob Barnett, said about 10 publishers competed for the book. Financial terms were not disclosed, but a source close to the negotiations said the deal was worth about $3 million. Barnett's other clients include former President Clinton, Sen. Hillary Rodham Clinton and former Secretary of State Madeleine Albright, whose memoirs will be published by Miramax next year.
FEATURES
By Jill Rosen and Matthew Hay Brown and Jill Rosen and Matthew Hay Brown,Sun reporters | June 18, 2008
Washington - Upon hearing of Tim Russert's death, Gianmarc Manzione had no idea what shocked him more - the passing of the seemingly vital journalist or that the news reduced him to tears. The Tampa, Fla., English professor abruptly ended a road trip with his girlfriend to attend Russert's wake yesterday in Washington. He stood in line with hundreds of viewers similarly, inexplicably moved - people who had never met the host of NBC's Meet the Press but who had watched him, respected him and shared an hour of their lives with him every Sunday morning.
FEATURES
By Stephen Kiehl and Stephen Kiehl,sun reporter | October 30, 2006
WASHINGTON -- It was classic Tim Russert: On yesterday's Meet the Press, Lt. Gov. Michael S. Steele was talking about the United States Supreme Court and Clarence Thomas, one of its most conservative justices. Steele has called Thomas a hero but yesterday said he disagrees with him on a number of issues. Like what? "I strongly support affirmative action," Steele said. Russert saw an opening. "You haven't always supported it," he said. "No, I've always supported affirmative action," Steele replied.
NEWS
By Richard B. Schmitt and Richard B. Schmitt,LOS ANGELES TIMES | February 9, 2007
WASHINGTON -- The government rested its perjury case yesterday against I. Lewis "Scooter" Libby, clearing the way for Libby's lawyers to launch their defense of the former vice presidential aide. The government's case concluded with a second day of testimony by Meet the Press moderator Tim Russert. Russert earlier testified that, contrary to what Libby had told a federal grand jury, he did not tell Libby about CIA operative Valerie Plame in the summer of 2003 when her husband, former envoy Joseph C. Wilson IV, was emerging as a critic of the Bush administration's war plan in Iraq.
NEWS
By Richard B. Schmitt and Richard B. Schmitt,LOS ANGELES TIMES | February 8, 2007
WASHINGTON -- Meet the Press moderator Tim Russert testified yesterday that he never gave former vice presidential aide I. Lewis "Scooter" Libby information about the wife of a Bush administration war critic, contradicting the premise of Libby's defense of perjury charges. Russert became the third journalist in the federal court trial to offer testimony that counters statements that Libby told investigators and a grand jury probing the outing of CIA operative Valerie Plame. The conversations - and alleged lies that Libby offered about them - form the crux of his perjury and obstruction indictment.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun television critic | June 19, 2008
A TV wake of six days and five nights for NBC newsman Tim Russert came to an end yesterday with a moving memorial service on cable channel MSNBC. Aptly representative of the arc of Russert's life, those eulogizing the 58-year-old anchor of Meet the Press ranged from an elementary school nun in Buffalo, N.Y., to the stars of mainstream media and singer Bruce Springsteen. From the announcement of Russert's death shortly after 3:30 p.m. Friday to yesterday's service that began at 4 p.m., TV served one of its primary ritualistic functions as a medium of mourning, offering access and an outlet for the affection that millions of Americans felt for an ebullient anchorman - as well as the grief they experienced at his death.
FEATURES
By Jill Rosen and Matthew Hay Brown and Jill Rosen and Matthew Hay Brown,Sun reporters | June 18, 2008
Washington - Upon hearing of Tim Russert's death, Gianmarc Manzione had no idea what shocked him more - the passing of the seemingly vital journalist or that the news reduced him to tears. The Tampa, Fla., English professor abruptly ended a road trip with his girlfriend to attend Russert's wake yesterday in Washington. He stood in line with hundreds of viewers similarly, inexplicably moved - people who had never met the host of NBC's Meet the Press but who had watched him, respected him and shared an hour of their lives with him every Sunday morning.
NEWS
June 17, 2008
A political candidate I was interviewing last year turned the tables on me and asked me why I got into journalism. I said that from the earliest I could remember, I just liked telling people stuff - an answer that drew much merriment from the candidate's aide, imagining my 5-year-old self quoting sources in the kitchen on what was for dinner that night. Well, yeah. Who doesn't want to be the first to not just know but also tell? I'm going to miss that glint in Tim Russert's eye. On countless election nights, the anchor would "toss" to him, as the TV guys say, the camera would swivel to his side of the desk, and there would be Russert, fairly thrumming with what he was about to tell.
NEWS
June 15, 2008
So it is that we find ourselves on Father's Day mourning a man who was one of the pre-eminent journalists of his generation - but, more important, a man who was passionate about his role as a father and a son. Tim Russert pursued his work as NBC Washington Bureau chief and moderator of Meet the Press with tough intelligence and joyous energy. He doggedly challenged politicians, Republicans and Democrats, and explained the tangled politics of Washington in fair-minded terms Americans appreciated.
NEWS
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | June 14, 2008
Tim Russert, the hard-charging and fast-talking NBC journalist who was equally respected by politicians and journalists, died of a heart attack on the job yesterday, collapsing in the network's Washington bureau that he so capably led the past decade. Mr. Russert, who also served as host of Meet the Press, the longest-running Sunday-morning public-affairs show on TV, was 58. The veteran newsman, who was recording voiceovers for Sunday's show when the attack occurred, was pronounced dead at Washington's Sibley Memorial Hospital after resuscitation efforts failed.
NEWS
By Richard B. Schmitt and Richard B. Schmitt,LOS ANGELES TIMES | February 9, 2007
WASHINGTON -- The government rested its perjury case yesterday against I. Lewis "Scooter" Libby, clearing the way for Libby's lawyers to launch their defense of the former vice presidential aide. The government's case concluded with a second day of testimony by Meet the Press moderator Tim Russert. Russert earlier testified that, contrary to what Libby had told a federal grand jury, he did not tell Libby about CIA operative Valerie Plame in the summer of 2003 when her husband, former envoy Joseph C. Wilson IV, was emerging as a critic of the Bush administration's war plan in Iraq.
NEWS
By Brenda J. Buote and Brenda J. Buote,SUN STAFF | May 18, 1997
In a brief speech punctuated by humor, political analyst Tim Russert offered graduating students at Loyola College these words of wisdom: To be successful, one must be committed to serving others.Russert told the seniors, "You now have a special obligation and responsibility. You must share. Openly. Freely. Absolutely. With all your heart and all your will. Without that sharing, we will perish -- as individuals, as a nation, as a world."We all must see if there isn't some child we can help.
FEATURES
By Knight-Ridder Newspapers | July 30, 1992
Attention, news junkies. NBC's "Meet the Press," anchored by NBC Washington bureau chief Tim Russert, will expand to an hour as of Sept. 20."Meet the Press," now seen from 9:30 to 10 a.m., (WMAR, Channel 2) will go from 9 to 10. That means 30 minutes less for Sunday "Today," to air from 8 to 9 a.m.Mr. Russert may add another journalist to his two-panelist format. Among his regulars: NBC's Andrea Mitchell, columnist David Broder and the New Yorker's Elizabeth Drew."Meet the Press," the country's longest-running news program, celebrates its 45th anniversary Nov. 6.
NEWS
By Richard B. Schmitt and Richard B. Schmitt,LOS ANGELES TIMES | February 8, 2007
WASHINGTON -- Meet the Press moderator Tim Russert testified yesterday that he never gave former vice presidential aide I. Lewis "Scooter" Libby information about the wife of a Bush administration war critic, contradicting the premise of Libby's defense of perjury charges. Russert became the third journalist in the federal court trial to offer testimony that counters statements that Libby told investigators and a grand jury probing the outing of CIA operative Valerie Plame. The conversations - and alleged lies that Libby offered about them - form the crux of his perjury and obstruction indictment.
FEATURES
By Stephen Kiehl and Stephen Kiehl,sun reporter | October 30, 2006
WASHINGTON -- It was classic Tim Russert: On yesterday's Meet the Press, Lt. Gov. Michael S. Steele was talking about the United States Supreme Court and Clarence Thomas, one of its most conservative justices. Steele has called Thomas a hero but yesterday said he disagrees with him on a number of issues. Like what? "I strongly support affirmative action," Steele said. Russert saw an opening. "You haven't always supported it," he said. "No, I've always supported affirmative action," Steele replied.
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