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By Andrea K. Walker and Andrea K. Walker,SUN STAFF | March 30, 2002
Hip-hop mogul Russell Simmons sits yoga-style on a couch in Baltimore's Harbour Court Hotel talking about a sneaker that looks a lot like the old three-striped Adidas shell toe shoe many a rapper sported in videos in the '80s. Lounging beside him wearing a pair of the shoes is former Run DMC rap group member and Simmons' brother, Joseph "Run" Simmons, one of the men who made the shell toe popular with the hit rap song "My Adidas." The new sneaker is the latest venture by Russell Simmons, the president of Def Jam Records who also has his own clothing line called Phat Farm.
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By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | August 21, 2013
Media mogul Russell Simmons might have apologized for posting a controversial parody video on his YouTube channel that's become known as "The Harriet Tubman Sex Tapes. " But, the famed abolitionist's great-great-great grandniece isn't even close to forgiving him. In a two-paged open letter to Simmons that was emailed to a reporter at The Baltimore Sun, the artist Tina Martin Wyatt verges on accusing the entertainer of being a race traitor. "Your parody of Aunt Harriet is not unlike parodies of African Americans by racist individuals in this country and others abroad," Wyatt writes.
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By Kelly Brewington and Kelly Brewington,SUN STAFF | April 22, 2005
Old-school hip-hop artist Doug E. Fresh's signature song, "The Show," was blasting through the speakers as he shouted: "If you're making money in the 2006, say, make money money, make money money money!" Audience members nodded to the beat and screamed back the response in true hip-hop concert form. But they didn't pack the Murphy Fine Arts Center at Morgan State University yesterday solely to be entertained. They were there, as the rapper reminded them, to learn the financial tools to "get their money right."
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By Brooke Nevils and Brooke Nevils,Sun Reporter | November 10, 2006
Actors Wood Harris and J.D. Williams, best known as Avon Barksdale and Preston "Bodie" Broadus on the HBO series The Wire, are back on the streets of Baltimore this week, filming another gritty depiction of the city's drug scene. But don't be fooled. It's not The Wire. It's the Hollywood adaptation of A Thug's Life, Baltimore native Thomas Long's debut novel about two partners-turned-rivals in a brutal west-side drug gang, Dogs for Life. 4 Life, the direct-to-DVD movie from Tony Austin, the president of Russell Simmons Music Group, and Baltimore Ravens linebacker Adalius Thomas began filming its Baltimore segments this week, on location at the Sandtown Barber Shop, the Inner Harbor and Federal Hill Park.
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By Rashod D. Ollison and Rashod D. Ollison,SUN POP MUSIC CRITIC | April 21, 2005
The word "hip-hop" may be in the title, but this gathering has nothing to do with rap lyrics and hard-hitting beats. The theme of the Maryland Hip-Hop Summit - a one-day conference at the Murphy Fine Arts Center on the campus of Morgan State University today - centers on financial literacy and creating wealth: Get Your Money Right. The event, which is free to the public, is spearheaded by Lt. Gov. Michael S. Steele and Hip-Hop Summit Action Network chairman and entertainment mogul Russell Simmons.
FEATURES
By Brooke Nevils and Brooke Nevils,Sun Reporter | November 10, 2006
Actors Wood Harris and J.D. Williams, best known as Avon Barksdale and Preston "Bodie" Broadus on the HBO series The Wire, are back on the streets of Baltimore this week, filming another gritty depiction of the city's drug scene. But don't be fooled. It's not The Wire. It's the Hollywood adaptation of A Thug's Life, Baltimore native Thomas Long's debut novel about two partners-turned-rivals in a brutal west-side drug gang, Dogs for Life. 4 Life, the direct-to-DVD movie from Tony Austin, the president of Russell Simmons Music Group, and Baltimore Ravens linebacker Adalius Thomas began filming its Baltimore segments this week, on location at the Sandtown Barber Shop, the Inner Harbor and Federal Hill Park.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sam Sessa and Sam Sessa,SUN STAFF | October 28, 2004
When many people think of live poetry, they picture their favorite cafe's open-mike night. The national tour of a Tony Award-winning theatrical event is the last thing on their minds. Those people have no idea what they're missing. Since 2002, Russell Simmons Def Poetry Jam has pushed performance poetry into the mainstream, winning the 2003 Tony Award for Best Special Theatrical Event. After a successful international run, the encore tour hits the Hippodrome Theatre for a three-night series tonight through Saturday.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Rashod D. Ollison and Rashod D. Ollison,Sun Pop Music Critic | April 4, 2004
Whatever preconceived notions you have about spoken word or performance poetry, please check them at the door. Russell Simmons Def Poetry Jam, which plays the Hippodrome Theatre Friday and Saturday , features seven poets performing urgent, revelatory pieces that delve into politics, sex, religion and personal histories. No elaborate, complicated props adorn the stage, and cast members sport regular street gear. Each poet -- a Palestinian, a Nigerian, a Chinese-American, three African-Americans -- offers kaleidoscopic views unflinchingly, humorously, sometimes movingly.
FEATURES
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | August 21, 2013
Media mogul Russell Simmons might have apologized for posting a controversial parody video on his YouTube channel that's become known as "The Harriet Tubman Sex Tapes. " But, the famed abolitionist's great-great-great grandniece isn't even close to forgiving him. In a two-paged open letter to Simmons that was emailed to a reporter at The Baltimore Sun, the artist Tina Martin Wyatt verges on accusing the entertainer of being a race traitor. "Your parody of Aunt Harriet is not unlike parodies of African Americans by racist individuals in this country and others abroad," Wyatt writes.
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By Nick Madigan and Nick Madigan,Sun Reporter | May 3, 2007
Shalom TV, a television channel that contains "ethical and moral programming" targeting Jewish audiences, will debut today in Baltimore, the greater Washington area and Northern Virginia for subscribers of Comcast's On Demand digital cable service. Until now, the channel has been available only in Philadelphia, where viewers have been treated recently to a panel discussion on Darfur from New York City; former President Jimmy Carter and Prof. Alan Dershowitz speaking at Brandeis University about the Israeli-Palestinian conflict; and hip-hop entertainer Russell Simmons discussing anti-Semitism.
NEWS
By Kelly Brewington and Kelly Brewington,SUN STAFF | April 22, 2005
Old-school hip-hop artist Doug E. Fresh's signature song, "The Show," was blasting through the speakers as he shouted: "If you're making money in the 2006, say, make money money, make money money money!" Audience members nodded to the beat and screamed back the response in true hip-hop concert form. But they didn't pack the Murphy Fine Arts Center at Morgan State University yesterday solely to be entertained. They were there, as the rapper reminded them, to learn the financial tools to "get their money right."
FEATURES
By Rashod D. Ollison and Rashod D. Ollison,SUN POP MUSIC CRITIC | April 21, 2005
The word "hip-hop" may be in the title, but this gathering has nothing to do with rap lyrics and hard-hitting beats. The theme of the Maryland Hip-Hop Summit - a one-day conference at the Murphy Fine Arts Center on the campus of Morgan State University today - centers on financial literacy and creating wealth: Get Your Money Right. The event, which is free to the public, is spearheaded by Lt. Gov. Michael S. Steele and Hip-Hop Summit Action Network chairman and entertainment mogul Russell Simmons.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sam Sessa and Sam Sessa,SUN STAFF | October 28, 2004
When many people think of live poetry, they picture their favorite cafe's open-mike night. The national tour of a Tony Award-winning theatrical event is the last thing on their minds. Those people have no idea what they're missing. Since 2002, Russell Simmons Def Poetry Jam has pushed performance poetry into the mainstream, winning the 2003 Tony Award for Best Special Theatrical Event. After a successful international run, the encore tour hits the Hippodrome Theatre for a three-night series tonight through Saturday.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Rashod D. Ollison and Rashod D. Ollison,Sun Pop Music Critic | April 4, 2004
Whatever preconceived notions you have about spoken word or performance poetry, please check them at the door. Russell Simmons Def Poetry Jam, which plays the Hippodrome Theatre Friday and Saturday , features seven poets performing urgent, revelatory pieces that delve into politics, sex, religion and personal histories. No elaborate, complicated props adorn the stage, and cast members sport regular street gear. Each poet -- a Palestinian, a Nigerian, a Chinese-American, three African-Americans -- offers kaleidoscopic views unflinchingly, humorously, sometimes movingly.
FEATURES
By Andrea K. Walker and Andrea K. Walker,SUN STAFF | March 30, 2002
Hip-hop mogul Russell Simmons sits yoga-style on a couch in Baltimore's Harbour Court Hotel talking about a sneaker that looks a lot like the old three-striped Adidas shell toe shoe many a rapper sported in videos in the '80s. Lounging beside him wearing a pair of the shoes is former Run DMC rap group member and Simmons' brother, Joseph "Run" Simmons, one of the men who made the shell toe popular with the hit rap song "My Adidas." The new sneaker is the latest venture by Russell Simmons, the president of Def Jam Records who also has his own clothing line called Phat Farm.
NEWS
By Tanika White and Tanika White,SUN STAFF | February 8, 2005
NEW YORK - Instead of strutting in stilettos, they bounced in saddle shoes. No, these were not the usual models seen on the runways of Fashion Week, except for the labels on the clothes they were wearing: Escada, Hilfiger, Sean John, Kenneth Cole, Nicole Miller. Those were some of the designers showing their fall lines here yesterday - for 4- to 11-year-olds. Call it high fashion for the knee-high set, the kind of cashmere blazers, leather jackets and faux furs that trendy moms and dads wear, miniaturized for their offspring.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 28, 2004
Trips Northwest Washington is home to Hillwood, the estate of Marjorie Merri-weather Post. The estate has an immense collection of French and Russian art and painstakingly land-scaped grounds. page 26 PICK OF THE WEEK What: Election Night Viewing Party, presented by 99.1 WHFS and Rock the Vote When: Tuesday night at 6:30 Where: 9:30 Club, 815 V St. N.W., Washington Why: Because there's nothing like seeing election results on the big screen. Plus, the event promises unnamed "very special guests," and who can pass up an offer like that?
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