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By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | September 8, 2007
Yesterday, while Russell Crowe was winning his best set of reviews in years for his tour-de-force villainy in 3:10 to Yuma, he was also playing a soccer dad in Annapolis. It was his first day of shooting on the international espionage thriller Body of Lies, and Crowe was doing two scenes at St. Andrew's United Methodist Day School: easing into the carpool area and watching one of his two fictional kids play soccer. Costarring Leonardo DiCaprio as a CIA agent determined to disrupt a terrorist network and Crowe as his boss, Body of Lies, adapted by William Monahan (The Departed)
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By CHRIS KALTENBACH | November 25, 2008
Starring Russell Crowe, Tom Hanks, Kurt Russell Directed by Ron Howard Universal Home Video $39.98 *** 1/2 Ron Howard is far from Hollywood's most consistent director. He can be awful, as in 2000's charmless The Grinch. But when he's on, he's very on. This four-film, eight-disc collection, filled with deleted scenes, documentaries and other extras, brings together two of his best, 2001's A Beautiful Mind, which won a Best Picture Oscar, and 1995's Apollo 13, which should have. It includes the middling Backdraft (1991)
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN FILM CRITIC | December 8, 2000
Not since Richard Burton and Elizabeth Taylor carnally charged "Cleopatra" has the off-screen chemistry between a film's co-stars raised such a ruckus - or provided such a built-in audience. As has been well-documented in gossip columns, scandal sheets and celebrity magazines, Meg Ryan and Russell Crowe became an item during the filming of "Proof of Life," which means audiences are waiting to find out one thing: Does all that real-life lust show up onscreen? I guess it does; Ryan and Crowe look at each other with full awareness that each is staring at one of the world's beautiful people.
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By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | September 8, 2007
Yesterday, while Russell Crowe was winning his best set of reviews in years for his tour-de-force villainy in 3:10 to Yuma, he was also playing a soccer dad in Annapolis. It was his first day of shooting on the international espionage thriller Body of Lies, and Crowe was doing two scenes at St. Andrew's United Methodist Day School: easing into the carpool area and watching one of his two fictional kids play soccer. Costarring Leonardo DiCaprio as a CIA agent determined to disrupt a terrorist network and Crowe as his boss, Body of Lies, adapted by William Monahan (The Departed)
ENTERTAINMENT
April 7, 2005
While that holds certain disappointments, they pale in comparison to the joy of writing unrestricted .... -- Russell Crowe, announcing that his band, 30 Odd Foot of Grunts, would have a new lineup.
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By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | September 7, 2007
The rousing new Western 3:10 to Yuma has the sweep of an epic and the economy of a stopwatch. It also has one of the best ad taglines of the year: "Time waits for one man." The man the ad refers to is master stagecoach bandit Ben Wade (Russell Crowe), but the key to this ruggedly beautiful movie is that it really applies to everyone. 3:10 to Yuma (Lionsgate) Starring Christian Bale, Russell Crowe, Ben Foster, Alan Tudyk, Gretchen Mol, Peter Fonda. Directed by James Mangold. Rated R. Time 117 minutes.
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By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | November 10, 2006
Ideal cold-weather entertainment - that's the best to be said about A Good Year, starring Russell Crowe as a ruthless London bond trader who inherits a chateau and vineyard in Provence from his uncle (Albert Finney) and rediscovers his soul. In some ways, Fox has been advertising this movie the way MGM sold Ninotchka - instead of proclaiming "Garbo Laughs!" the poster shots prove that Russell Crowe can grin. I still root for Crowe; he's got untapped versatility and complexity. It's good to see him acting goofy after the toil of Cinderella Man. But the comic spirit doesn't possess him here the way it did in Rough Magic 10 years ago, the way it does Finney and young Freddie Highmore (playing Crowe as a kid)
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By Susan Reimer | July 1, 2001
I am not sure whether it is the residual hormones in meat or the sexual desensitization of society, but my 15-year-old daughter and her 15-year-old friends think Russell Crowe is, like, seriously hot. "Gladiator" has made it to HBO, where no one checks IDs, and it has been playing in my family room like it is on a video loop. Jessie and her friends are not put off by the adult content, adult language and graphic violence from which the R rating seeks to protect their tender souls. They consider it the boring interruption of a wonderful love story.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | September 24, 1993
'Romper Stomper'Starring Russell Crowe and Daniel PollockDirected by Geoffrey WrightReleased by Academy EntertainmentRated NC-17*** You see them and you wonder: Why? With their shaven heads, tattooed bodies, festering hatreds, fetishistic fascination with leather, chains, the icons of the Third Reich, and those dead, dead eyes, the skinheads seem to have beamed to Earth from the Planet of the Droogs. What immortal hand or eye could frame their fearful symmetry?That's the question Geoffrey Wright fails to examine in his controversial and mega-violent examination of their culture, Australian style, in "Romper Stomper," opening today at the Charles.
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By CHRIS KALTENBACH | November 25, 2008
Starring Russell Crowe, Tom Hanks, Kurt Russell Directed by Ron Howard Universal Home Video $39.98 *** 1/2 Ron Howard is far from Hollywood's most consistent director. He can be awful, as in 2000's charmless The Grinch. But when he's on, he's very on. This four-film, eight-disc collection, filled with deleted scenes, documentaries and other extras, brings together two of his best, 2001's A Beautiful Mind, which won a Best Picture Oscar, and 1995's Apollo 13, which should have. It includes the middling Backdraft (1991)
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By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | September 7, 2007
The rousing new Western 3:10 to Yuma has the sweep of an epic and the economy of a stopwatch. It also has one of the best ad taglines of the year: "Time waits for one man." The man the ad refers to is master stagecoach bandit Ben Wade (Russell Crowe), but the key to this ruggedly beautiful movie is that it really applies to everyone. 3:10 to Yuma (Lionsgate) Starring Christian Bale, Russell Crowe, Ben Foster, Alan Tudyk, Gretchen Mol, Peter Fonda. Directed by James Mangold. Rated R. Time 117 minutes.
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By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | November 10, 2006
Ideal cold-weather entertainment - that's the best to be said about A Good Year, starring Russell Crowe as a ruthless London bond trader who inherits a chateau and vineyard in Provence from his uncle (Albert Finney) and rediscovers his soul. In some ways, Fox has been advertising this movie the way MGM sold Ninotchka - instead of proclaiming "Garbo Laughs!" the poster shots prove that Russell Crowe can grin. I still root for Crowe; he's got untapped versatility and complexity. It's good to see him acting goofy after the toil of Cinderella Man. But the comic spirit doesn't possess him here the way it did in Rough Magic 10 years ago, the way it does Finney and young Freddie Highmore (playing Crowe as a kid)
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By Dan Thanh Dang and Stephen Kiehl and Dan Thanh Dang and Stephen Kiehl,SUN STAFF | June 29, 2005
Anyone wondering where all the moviegoers have gone, says 30-year-old Sherry Wright, need only do the math. To catch a flick at the AMC Owings Mills theater, where her family prefers to go, she would have to pay $8.50 each for three tickets: her own, her boyfriend's and his 12-year-old daughter's. Add $5.50 apiece for her boyfriend's two younger daughters and her own daughter and son, all of whom qualify for children's rates. Throw in small sodas priced at $3 each, large sodas for the adults at $4 each and some popcorn at $5 per bucket.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 7, 2005
While that holds certain disappointments, they pale in comparison to the joy of writing unrestricted .... -- Russell Crowe, announcing that his band, 30 Odd Foot of Grunts, would have a new lineup.
NEWS
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | March 1, 2004
Caught between the ABC network's need to attract young male viewers and the motion picture academy's insistence on a "dignified" program in the wake of Janet Jackson's Super Bowl debacle, last night's 76th Annual Academy Awards telecast began as a tightrope act. "Expect the unexpected," was the network's mantra last week, according to Louis J. Horvitz, director of the telecast. To further entice younger television viewers, the telecast was peppered with such MTV-friendly performers as Jack Black, Ben Stiller and Will Ferrell.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | November 23, 2003
Master and Commander: The Far Side of the World is becoming that new-millennium rarity, an adult blockbuster. In its opening weekend, it rang up numbers comparable to the youthful comedy smash Elf, but with an audience largely over the age of 25. (The estimate of over-25 viewers was an extraordinary 83 percent.) In weeks to come, it should lure younger audiences the way The Bridge on the River Kwai or Lawrence of Arabia did in their day: by putting across to adolescents the glamour and potency of thinking and acting like a grown-up.
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | October 1, 1999
Think of "Rocky" on ice skates.That's what you get with "Mystery, Alaska," one of those hard-to-resist little guys-vs.-the world sports tales in which success isn't nearly as important as survival. Here, it's a ragtag bunch of Alaskan hockey players going up against the NHL's mighty New York Rangers.Created by prolific TV producer-director David E. Kelley ("Ally McBeal," "The Practice," "Chicago Hope," etc.), it's filled with his trademark touches: near-absurd situations, characters jumping from one inner crisis to the next, and a sometimes uneasy mix of humor and pathos.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Rene Rodriguez and Rene Rodriguez,Knight-Ridder News Service | May 12, 1995
"The Sum of Us" takes familiar dramatic ground -- father-son relationships -- and gives it a provocative twist. Harry (Jack Thompson), the father, is a widower in search of a new mate. Jeff (Russell Crowe), the son, is also looking for love -- and gay.But instead of fiery confrontations about sexuality, "The Sum of Us" focuses on the unbreakable bonds of family. Not only do Harry and Jeff get along, Harry is downright enthusiastic in helping his son find a boyfriend. When Jeff picks up Greg (John Polson)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tamara Ikenberg and Tamara Ikenberg,Special to the Sun | January 27, 2002
When Nicole Kidman rose to accept her Golden Globe for the seizure-inducing Moulin Rouge last weekend, it was more than an impossibly gorgeous Aussie accepting a fake Oscar, it was high drama: Striking divorcee enjoys career high in aftermath of traumatic breakup, while ex-hubbie and his fiery Latina munchkin, whom he may have recently wed in Colorado (juicy, juicy!) are nowhere to be seen. We don't know Nicole, but we think we know her story, and in that is a lesson for us all. Three months ago, the cult of celebrity worship -- America's passion for knowing, or at least being fed, the iffy info about superstar private lives -- was predicted to perish.
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