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NEWS
April 23, 2006
On April 21, 2006, MARY A. RUSK (nee Meehan) of Baltimore, MD; beloved wife of the late Carroll Guy Rusk, Sr.; devoted mother of Carroll G. Rusk, Jr., Louis E. Rusk, Mary A. Greenwich; loving grandmother of John, Timothy, Zachary, Jessica, Jonathan, Stephen and Joseph; great-grandmother of Sara, Madison and Andrew; cherished sister of James, Paul, Raymond, Joyce and George. Friends may call at the LOUDON PARK FUNERAL HOME, 3620 Wilkens Avenue, Baltimore, MD, on Sunday, April 23 from 2 to 4 and 6 to 8 P.M., where a Funeral Service will be held Monday, April 24 at 1:30 P.M. Interment Loudon Park Cemetery.
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NEWS
October 20, 2009
On October 15, 2009, HAROLD D. RUSK, SR. aka "Bubby" son of the late Dorothy Tilghman and Lloyd Rusk and step son of Randolph Tilghman; loving father of Harold Jr., Michelle, Dorothy, Lisa and Christine. The family will accept condolences at 1520 W. North Avenue. Memorial services will be held at St. Katherine's Church, 2001 Division Street on Friday, October 23, 2009 at 1 P.M.
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NEWS
June 20, 2002
Mary Alice Rusk, the retired director of libraries for the city school system, died June 13 from complications of cancer at Good Samaritan Hospital. She was 86 and lived in Morgan Park. She retired in 1975 as director of library sciences and coordinator of media and technology. She also had taught in city schools. "She had a reputation for high expectations and exacting standards," said her son, Osborne B. Dixon Jr., who lives in Baltimore. Born in Baltimore and raised on McCulloh Street, Mary Alice Chambers was a 1931 graduate of Frederick Douglass High School.
NEWS
April 23, 2006
On April 21, 2006, MARY A. RUSK (nee Meehan) of Baltimore, MD; beloved wife of the late Carroll Guy Rusk, Sr.; devoted mother of Carroll G. Rusk, Jr., Louis E. Rusk, Mary A. Greenwich; loving grandmother of John, Timothy, Zachary, Jessica, Jonathan, Stephen and Joseph; great-grandmother of Sara, Madison and Andrew; cherished sister of James, Paul, Raymond, Joyce and George. Friends may call at the LOUDON PARK FUNERAL HOME, 3620 Wilkens Avenue, Baltimore, MD, on Sunday, April 23 from 2 to 4 and 6 to 8 P.M., where a Funeral Service will be held Monday, April 24 at 1:30 P.M. Interment Loudon Park Cemetery.
NEWS
By MICHAEL HILL and MICHAEL HILL,SUN REPORTER | April 9, 2006
Unlike a lot of urban experts, David Rusk has been on the front lines - he was mayor of Albuquerque, N.M., from 1977 to 1981. Now a consultant based in Washington, Rusk has spent a lot of his time looking at Baltimore. His 1996 book Baltimore Unbound: A Strategy for Regional Renewal decried what he called the "inelastic" nature of the city's archaic boundaries, arguing that it is necessary for the entire region to share the burdens dumped onto the urban core. He sees a repetition of these problems behind the current controversy over city schools.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,SUN STAFF | December 5, 1995
Baltimore County's business leaders have never been fans of low-income housing or regional government, but they have invited a controversial advocate for both as a speaker.David Rusk, an urban analyst whose book "Baltimore Unbound" calls for limited regional government and laws requiring low- and moderate-income houses in every new development, will bring his message to Towson Monday.Both ideas have been looked upon as poison for years in the county. As recently as last year, residents of eastern Baltimore County helped defeat the federal Moving to Opportunity program.
NEWS
September 17, 1996
COLUMBIANS WENT to the local branch of the Johns Hopkins University School of Continuing Studies last week for a report card on their town's handling of low-income housing.Distributing the grade was urban poverty expert David Rusk, author of "Cities Without Suburbs" and the controversial "Baltimore Unbound" report. Judging from his remarks, Columbia got a B-plus in dealing with poverty -- good, but a notch below its past performance.Mr. Rusk praised Columbia founder James W. Rouse for creating a community 29 years ago that sought a mix of people from various socioeconomic backgrounds.
NEWS
By Mike Bowler and Mike Bowler,SUN STAFF | September 28, 2003
When poor children attend school with students from wealthier backgrounds, they perform much better on standardized tests, according to a new study of Baltimore-area schools. But thousands of children don't get that chance. Increasingly, they're trapped in schools without economic and racial diversity, says the report written for the Abell Foundation by economist and urban policy authority David Rusk. In the declining number of schools with economic diversity - poor children studying alongside wealthier children - Rusk found a positive effect on academic performance, as measured by scores on the Comprehensive Test of Basic Skills.
BUSINESS
By TIMOTHY J. MULLANEY and TIMOTHY J. MULLANEY,SUN STAFF Staff writers Joanna Daemmrich and Patrick Gilbert contributed to this article | October 15, 1995
An article in the Oct. 15 editions incorrectly reported that the city of Baltimore's settlement of a suit brought by the American Civil Liberties Union on behalf of tenants at four city housing projects that have been demolished or are slated for demolition would force residents to move out of the city.The Sun regrets the errors.Baltimore can cut its rate of poverty in half by 2015 if Maryland adopts policies aimed at spreading more poor Baltimoreans, especially poor blacks, throughout six surrounding counties and funneling some property taxes from suburban growth back into the city, according to a new book by one of the nation's leading urban scholars.
NEWS
July 30, 1995
"Cities Without Suburbs," by David Rusk, which sends a clarion call for Baltimore and suburbs to build a regional economic base. Mr. Rusk says we need to unite, marketing our region to national and international employers. It's great advice.Mary Pat Clarke, president of the Baltimore City Council and candidate for mayor
NEWS
By MICHAEL HILL and MICHAEL HILL,SUN REPORTER | April 9, 2006
Unlike a lot of urban experts, David Rusk has been on the front lines - he was mayor of Albuquerque, N.M., from 1977 to 1981. Now a consultant based in Washington, Rusk has spent a lot of his time looking at Baltimore. His 1996 book Baltimore Unbound: A Strategy for Regional Renewal decried what he called the "inelastic" nature of the city's archaic boundaries, arguing that it is necessary for the entire region to share the burdens dumped onto the urban core. He sees a repetition of these problems behind the current controversy over city schools.
NEWS
January 22, 2004
On January 19, 2004 MITCHELLVisitation at 2140 N. Fulton Avenue, on Friday 3 to 8 P.M. The family will receive friends in the chapel on Saturday at 10 A.M. Funeral at 10:30 A.M.
NEWS
October 10, 2003
WHEN URBAN POLICY analyst David Rusk probes the effects of poverty on Baltimore-area public schools, he finds a festering wound. For it is not news that wherever poor students are concentrated, communities often have allowed schools to fail - and wherever poor children go to school with better-off peers, education happens. So the continuing flight of the middle class from Baltimore damns those schools abandoned to the poor, Mr. Rusk warns in a new report for the Abell Foundation. He sees signs of the same trouble in increasingly segregated inner-ring county schools, where, the Citizens Planning and Housing Association confirms, lower-income families have fled like their wealthier cousins, seeking better options for their kids.
NEWS
By Mike Bowler and Mike Bowler,SUN STAFF | September 28, 2003
When poor children attend school with students from wealthier backgrounds, they perform much better on standardized tests, according to a new study of Baltimore-area schools. But thousands of children don't get that chance. Increasingly, they're trapped in schools without economic and racial diversity, says the report written for the Abell Foundation by economist and urban policy authority David Rusk. In the declining number of schools with economic diversity - poor children studying alongside wealthier children - Rusk found a positive effect on academic performance, as measured by scores on the Comprehensive Test of Basic Skills.
NEWS
June 20, 2002
Mary Alice Rusk, the retired director of libraries for the city school system, died June 13 from complications of cancer at Good Samaritan Hospital. She was 86 and lived in Morgan Park. She retired in 1975 as director of library sciences and coordinator of media and technology. She also had taught in city schools. "She had a reputation for high expectations and exacting standards," said her son, Osborne B. Dixon Jr., who lives in Baltimore. Born in Baltimore and raised on McCulloh Street, Mary Alice Chambers was a 1931 graduate of Frederick Douglass High School.
FEATURES
By Randy Myers and Randy Myers,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | December 31, 2001
There's an art to it, really, wrapping up a movie with that one crucial closing line. It's gotta be clever. It's gotta be catchy. And above all, it's gotta capture the spirit of everything that's preceded it. "There's no place like home." That's an easy one, a $2,000 question on Who Wants to Be a Millionaire, to which the answer, of course, is: The Wizard of Oz. Sure, any self-respecting film buff can come up with dozens of killer lines from within the movies, from "Hasta la vista, baby" (Terminator 2)
NEWS
February 28, 1996
Esther Manz, 88, a Wisconsin homemaker who founded the weight-loss program known as TOPS (Take Off Pounds Sensibly), died Monday in Milwaukee. At age 40 and weighing 208 pounds, she founded the organization, which calls itself the oldest and largest international noncommercial weight-loss support group.Virginia Foisie Rusk, 80, widow of former U.S. Secretary of State Dean Rusk, died Saturday in Athens, Ga. The Rusks, married in 1937, moved in 1970 to Athens. Mr. Rusk, chief foreign adviser to Presidents John F. Kennedy and Lyndon B. Johnson in the Vietnam War era, taught at the University of Georgia and died in 1994.
NEWS
By THEO LIPPMAN JR | December 26, 1994
IT WAS IRONIC (and wrong) that the last word on Dean Rusk on National Public Radio was David Halberstam's.Rusk didn't have a lot of use for journalists, and Halberstam was probably his least favorite. I'll tell you why in a minute, but first:Rusk will be remembered for many things, not least his remark, "We are eyeball to eyeball, and the other fellow just blinked."Rusk was secretary of state during the Cuban missile crisis in 1962. The Soviet Union had constructed a missile launching site in Cuba, and Soviet ships believed to be carrying missiles were en route.
NEWS
By Eric Siegel and Eric Siegel,SUN STAFF | November 1, 2001
The gap in the value of homes owned by blacks and whites in the Baltimore region is among the greatest of any of the country's 100 largest metropolitan areas, a new study shows. Homes owned by blacks in the city and its surrounding counties were worth 30 percent less than those owned by whites after adjusting for differences in incomes, according to the Brookings Institution study by urban researcher David Rusk. The disparity is greater than that of all but three of the country's largest metropolitan areas, the study says.
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