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Rush To Judgment

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By WILEY A. HALL | April 25, 1995
Shortly after a bomb destroyed the federal building in Oklahoma City last week and took the lives of at least 80 people, so-called experts on terrorism were saying that the explosion appeared to have been the work of Islamic fundamentalists.The Pentagon rushed Arab-speaking translators to the blast site to grill suspects. Congressmen threatened military retaliation against any Middle Eastern state found to have been involved. And "suspicious-looking" Arab-Americans were stopped and questioned by police all over the country.
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NEWS
September 30, 2014
The letter from Dawn DiBattista regarding the shameful flip-flop of the NFL and the Ravens in their treatment of Ray Rice expresses a well-reasoned point of view that has been largely suppressed by the vitriol of the do-gooders who would impose their one-size-fits-all solution to the domestic violence problem we face in our society ( "Ravens have fumbled badly," Sept. 26). Congratulations, Ms. DiBattista, for expressing so well the notion that individual circumstances should not be ignored when punishing individuals who have violated the law. How we mete out punishment says much about us as a society.
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SPORTS
By David Whitley | August 22, 2007
ORLANDO, Fla. -- Now that Michael Vick has passed judgment on himself, is it safe for the rest of us to do the same? Can we express outrage without being accused of loving dogs more than humans? I posed these questions to a confidante Monday. She looked at me and smiled. "Ruff," Hannah said. She's a Labrador and not very adept at English. But I took her response to mean it's finally OK to be rough on Vick. On Monday, he took "full responsibility" for his actions, mainly to avoid facing responsibility for more charges federal authorities had lined up. The only questions now concern how much jail time he'll get and how long it will take for him to get a contract from TNA Wrestling.
NEWS
June 4, 2012
A report last week recommending all charges be dropped against two city school department employees accused of tampering with student test booklets in order to raise their school's scores on state standardized exams is not only a personal embarrassment for schools CEO Andrés Alonso, who appears to have pursued the allegations long after it was obvious the city couldn't prove its case, but also a serious setback for the school system, whose credibility for...
NEWS
October 28, 2008
Today, the Maryland State of Board of Education meets to consider whether to delay a long-anticipated plan to make the statewide High School Assessment tests a requirement for a diploma. Critics of the rule say it's unfair to students who for one reason or another don't test well but who otherwise meet all the requirements for graduation. Proponents argue the tests are essential for raising academic standards and turning out better-prepared graduates for college and the workplace. But the evidence on both sides is at best inconclusive.
SPORTS
By Kevin Eck | September 6, 2007
There's no news that could ever be good news when it comes to the Chris Benoit double murder-suicide. But for those looking for answers as to how someone who was so well-liked and respected by his peers could commit such unspeakable crimes, yesterday's developments might shed some light. Doctors who examined Benoit's brain suggested that repeated concussions could have contributed to the killings. One of the doctors stressed that there is no way to know for sure if the concussions played a role, but the level of brain damage Benoit sustained can cause depression and irrational behavior, he said.
SPORTS
By Stephen Kiehl and Stephen Kiehl,stephen.kiehl@baltsun.com | November 14, 2008
The state dropped all charges yesterday against Mark Karcher, the boys basketball coach at St. Frances, who had been arrested on assault and burglary charges in September. A spokeswoman for the Baltimore state's attorney's office said the charges against Karcher, 29, were dropped for lack of evidence. "He's very relieved and just wants to move on," said Karcher's lawyer, David B. Irwin. "I think Mark's going to go forward and be a great basketball coach for St. Frances, and I think he'll be a good role model for kids."
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | May 14, 2000
Advocates seeking a pardon for a black man they believe was wrongly convicted and executed in 1919 for killing a pregnant white woman will hold a memorial service for him on what would have been his 110th birthday. They hope to know by the ceremony June 10 if Gov. Parris N. Glendening will pardon John Snowden, the last man hanged in Anne Arundel County. Snowden was convicted of the Aug. 8, 1917, killing of Lottie Mae Brandon. His hanging Feb. 28, 1919, brought such turmoil to the state capital that the National Guard was called in to keep the peace.
NEWS
By Sam Banks | August 19, 1994
THE REV. Benjamin Chavis assumed the leadership of the NAACP in April 1993 with immense enthusiasm, ebullience, verve and a potent and dynamic vision for expanding the role of African Americans in our national life.Hopes were high in the African-American community as Mr. Chavis increased NAACP membership and attracted young people to the organization, especially those who were jobless, alienated and dispossessed. He said he signed up 100,000 new members, swelling the organization's ranks to about 600,000 members.
NEWS
March 7, 2001
Rush to judgment on Clinton's pardon betrays hypocrisy The rush to judgment about former President Clinton's pardon of Marc Rich and others is stunning in its immoderation and unanimity. It seems everyone knows without a doubt that Mr. Clinton's actions and motives were sleazy, slimy, embarrassing and unforgivable ("Stench grows as scandal dogs Clinton," Feb. 25). From all quarters we hear expressions of shock and dismay that Clinton's pardon of Marc Rich represents special and favorable treatment to a Democratic fund-raiser.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton and Tricia Bishop, The Baltimore Sun | March 13, 2012
A defense attorney cautioned Tuesday against a "rush to judgment" as a Baltimore police officer is investigated for his conduct following a 13-year-old girl's fatal shooting. Officer John A. Ward was suspended by the agency more than a week ago after involuntary manslaughter charges were filed against two juveniles in the accidental shooting of Monae Turnage. Her body was found under trash bags in an East Baltimore backyard on March 4. Attorney Christie Needleman, who confirmed that she is representing Ward, said there are "two sides to every story" but declined to comment further as the investigation continues.
NEWS
March 6, 2012
Rush Limbaugh is the reigning shock jock of conservative political punditry - insults, outrage and outsized bluster are his stock in trade - so it takes quite an uproar for him to apologize. But that's what he has done at least twice now, if unconvincingly, after calling 30-year-old Georgetown law student Sandra Fluke a "slut" and "prostitute" for testifying to a Congressional panel in favor of the Obama administration's birth control mandate. Last week's personal attack was outrageous, particularly given that Ms. Fluke's testimony was never about her desire to have "recreational sexual activities" as Mr. Limbaugh continued to describe the matter in his on-line apology.
NEWS
December 6, 2010
I am appalled by the Baltimore Sun's coverage of the recent incident in which a black teenager was allegedly beaten up by a member of Shomrim ( "Tension in Park Heights," Dec. 5). Our justice system requires a presumption of innocence until proven guilty by a court of law. Yet your reporters chose to totally disregard that basic tenet, tried and convicted a young man with no prior criminal record and then chose to interview rabble-rousing clergymen to justify their "verdict" and try to create a rift between the black and Jewish communities.
SPORTS
By Stephen Kiehl and Stephen Kiehl,stephen.kiehl@baltsun.com | November 14, 2008
The state dropped all charges yesterday against Mark Karcher, the boys basketball coach at St. Frances, who had been arrested on assault and burglary charges in September. A spokeswoman for the Baltimore state's attorney's office said the charges against Karcher, 29, were dropped for lack of evidence. "He's very relieved and just wants to move on," said Karcher's lawyer, David B. Irwin. "I think Mark's going to go forward and be a great basketball coach for St. Frances, and I think he'll be a good role model for kids."
NEWS
October 28, 2008
Today, the Maryland State of Board of Education meets to consider whether to delay a long-anticipated plan to make the statewide High School Assessment tests a requirement for a diploma. Critics of the rule say it's unfair to students who for one reason or another don't test well but who otherwise meet all the requirements for graduation. Proponents argue the tests are essential for raising academic standards and turning out better-prepared graduates for college and the workplace. But the evidence on both sides is at best inconclusive.
SPORTS
By Kevin Eck | September 6, 2007
There's no news that could ever be good news when it comes to the Chris Benoit double murder-suicide. But for those looking for answers as to how someone who was so well-liked and respected by his peers could commit such unspeakable crimes, yesterday's developments might shed some light. Doctors who examined Benoit's brain suggested that repeated concussions could have contributed to the killings. One of the doctors stressed that there is no way to know for sure if the concussions played a role, but the level of brain damage Benoit sustained can cause depression and irrational behavior, he said.
NEWS
October 25, 1990
Don't rush to judgment of IsraelThe riots that took place on the Temple Mount in Jerusalem on Oct. 8 were a tragedy, and we deplore the innocent loss of life; we said so in a release to the media the next day. We also argued that a rush to judgment without benefit of the facts would be unfair. Unfortunately, our concerns were not shared by The Evening Sun on at least two occasions. In an editorial Oct. 10, "A Tale in Two Sentences," you obviously came to the conclusion that Israel is guilty until proven innocent.
NEWS
October 20, 2002
IT'S ONLY NATURAL that the sniper terrorizing the Washington suburbs has inspired a lot of talk about guns, and the laws that regulate them. The utter randomness of these shootings means everyone -- even those who previously thought gun policy had nothing to do with their lives -- now has reason to wonder whether enough is being done to keep firearms from criminals. Are the laws we have sufficient? Do they even work? Are more restrictive measures justified? Those questions deserve a thorough public airing, not just in Maryland and Virginia, but throughout the United States.
SPORTS
By David Whitley | August 22, 2007
ORLANDO, Fla. -- Now that Michael Vick has passed judgment on himself, is it safe for the rest of us to do the same? Can we express outrage without being accused of loving dogs more than humans? I posed these questions to a confidante Monday. She looked at me and smiled. "Ruff," Hannah said. She's a Labrador and not very adept at English. But I took her response to mean it's finally OK to be rough on Vick. On Monday, he took "full responsibility" for his actions, mainly to avoid facing responsibility for more charges federal authorities had lined up. The only questions now concern how much jail time he'll get and how long it will take for him to get a contract from TNA Wrestling.
NEWS
By Nia-Malika Henderson and Nia-Malika Henderson,sun reporter | June 12, 2007
Annapolis police Chief Joseph Johnson acknowledged yesterday that members of his force botched a drug raid, but he cautioned against what he called a "collective rush to judgment" of the officers' actions. "The APD has apologized for this mistake several times," Johnson wrote in an e-mailed statement. "What I have not done, and cannot do until the investigation into this incident is complete is respond to allegations that have been made about my officers." In what Johnson termed a "dynamic entry," about a dozen members of the department's special team forced open a door and threw in a percussion grenade about 8:20 p.m. Wednesday at a Spa Cove apartment where an immigrant couple were making dinner.
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