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By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,London Bureau of The Sun | June 27, 1995
WIMBLEDON, England -- The new king of British tennis is a kid from . . . just outside Montreal?The player's name is Greg Rusedski. He's 21. He has a serve like thunder. And unlike the rest of the players in his adopted country, he's actually not afraid to talk about winning.So yesterday, Rusedski showed up at Wimbledon, took over Court No. 3, clocked some lucky loser named Stephane Simian of France in the first round, 6-3, 6-3, 6-3, and signed so many autographs it looked as if his hand would fall off.The only thing missing was a sea of Union Jacks.
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By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,SUN STAFF | August 5, 2005
WASHINGTON - The video camera was in place when Arnaud Clement took his seat at the front of the mostly empty interview room. Not much interest in the Frenchman who will face James Blake this afternoon for a place in the Legg Mason Tennis Classic semifinals. Clement listened to the first question after his, 4-6, 6-3, 6-4 victory over last season's runner-up Gilles Muller and asked one of his own. "Can I come sit with you?" he asked and actually got up and tried to come sit among the small gathering of reporters.
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By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,SUN STAFF | September 8, 1997
NEW YORK -- No. 13-ranked Patrick Rafter could feel what was coming. A bam-bam-bam net exchange got him his first point in what would be the last game of this U.S. Open men's championship, and Rafter pumped his fist.When a forehand volley winner put him two points from victory, he put his hand in the air, pumped -- and waved at the crowd.A 101-mph ace brought the Australian to match point and when he connected on a sharp cross-court forehand volley for the winning point, Rafter didn't know what to do with himself.
SPORTS
By LAURA VECSEY | January 16, 2004
NO WONDER Mary Carillo rolls her eyes every time her former doubles partner, John McEnroe, opens his big mouth. Oops, sorry. McEnroe's mouth isn't that big after all. Otherwise, why did it take him 12 years to finally come clean about steroids? Maybe McEnroe will turn out to be the Jose Canseco or the Ken Caminiti of tennis. His admission - long overdue - comes a few days after British tennis player Greg Rusedski revealed last week that he had tested positive for nandrolone last summer.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,SUN STAFF | September 2, 2002
NEW YORK -- At the end of a long, rainy afternoon, No. 1 seed Serena Williams strolled onto the Arthur Ashe Stadium Court in her baby-pink and black tennis outfit. She brightened the day for fans, who had hung around for 7 1/2 hours hoping to see some tennis. Williams started strong, breaking Daja Bedanova in the first game and going on to win, 6-1, 6-1. It was the only match that was finished before rain returned to the National Tennis Center. Out on Louis Armstrong Stadium, No. 17 Pete Sampras and No. 33 Greg Rusedski were engaged in a competitive match.
SPORTS
By Todd Richissin and Todd Richissin,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | June 26, 2003
WIMBLEDON, England - If Andy Roddick is the future of American tennis, yesterday he gave every indication that the future may be now. In the most anticipated match so far in the Wimbledon championships, Roddick remained calm and focused while benefiting from a meltdown at Centre Court by Canadian-turned-Brit Greg Rusedski, who blew his cool and a 5-2 third-set lead and never won another game. In a battle of two of tennis' fastest servers, Roddick advanced to the third round with a 7-6 (4)
SPORTS
By James Giza and James Giza,SUN STAFF | August 15, 2001
WASHINGTON -- The last time Greg Rusedski felt this good, he made it to the finals of the U.S. Open. Injuries have prevented the Canadian-born British citizen from competing in a full summer hard-court circuit since 1997, but a return to normalcy this year has meant fewer trips to the doctor and a renewed pleasure for being on the court. "If you go into the doctor's every two weeks, you can't really enjoy it that much, can you?" said Rusedski, who visited 10 doctors last year. "I'm 0-for-10 this year seeing doctors, so that's a good stat."
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,SUN STAFF | September 4, 1997
NEW YORK -- No. 20 Greg Rusedski was the first men's quarterfinalist to move into the U.S. Open semifinals yesterday. But few seemed to care.Many fans in Arthur Ashe Stadium left after watching a wonderful 2 1/2 -hour confrontation between No. 3 seed Jana Novotna and No. 6 Lindsay Davenport. Finally, Davenport won a third-set tiebreaker to upset her doubles partner, 6-2, 4-6, 7-6 (7-5).Davenport will now play No. 1 Martina Hingis, a 6-3, 6-2 winner over No. 10 Arantxa Sanchez Vicario for the right to meet the winner of the other semifinal between fellow American Venus Williams and Romanian Irina Spirlea in Sunday's final.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,SUN STAFF | September 3, 2002
NEW YORK - Pete Sampras brought his happy heart and big serve into the third round of the U.S. Open last night, hoping for a bit of the old magic. He told everyone early on here that he still has the game at the age of 31 to win another Grand Slam. It would be No. 14, should he get it. Last night, under the lights at Louis Armstrong Stadium, he met No. 33 Greg Rusedski, a determined Brit who didn't believe it before the match and still didn't believe it afterward. Together, in front of a Sampras-partial crowd, they tangoed into a fifth and deciding set, Sampras rolling his shoulders between points and Rusedski touching his socks for luck after every point.
SPORTS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | July 3, 2002
WIMBLEDON, England - He used to change his hair color like other guys changed their shirts, used to skip practice, used to have an attitude, used to carry a label as a flashy tennis player of promise. But Xavier Malisse of Belgium never really found any tennis success until he decided to get serious about his sport. And yesterday, the 21-year-old, ponytailed swashbuckler packed his revived career into a one-set showdown with Britain's Greg Rusedski. On Centre Court, facing a crowd of flag-waving British fans, Malisse was trying to close out a match that was tied at two sets apiece when darkness descended Monday.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,SUN STAFF | August 1, 2003
WASHINGTON - Mardy Fish sat back relaxed in his chair in the interview room yesterday evening as his friend, Andy Roddick, headed out to the Stadium Court to face Greg Rusedski in a match the crowd at the Legg Mason Tennis Classic had been anticipating all day. Fish had drawn his share of fans to the much-smaller Grandstand Court about an hour earlier, when he was putting together a game plan that would upset No. 5 seed Yevgeny Kafelnikov, 6-4, 3-6,...
SPORTS
By Charles Bricker and Charles Bricker,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 27, 2003
WIMBLEDON, England - Greg Rusedski's profanity-laced outburst and subsequent implosion in the Andy Roddick match earned a relatively small $2,500 fine from Wimbledon officials. He has probably also earned a lifetime's worth of bad publicity in this country, though he was never much in favor with Britain's cricket crowd, anyway. Rusedski is a footballer's guy, a rough-and-tumble counterpoint to Tim Henman, who is the cricket fan's hero with his perfect attire, always neat hair and impeccable manners.
SPORTS
By Todd Richissin and Todd Richissin,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | June 26, 2003
WIMBLEDON, England - If Andy Roddick is the future of American tennis, yesterday he gave every indication that the future may be now. In the most anticipated match so far in the Wimbledon championships, Roddick remained calm and focused while benefiting from a meltdown at Centre Court by Canadian-turned-Brit Greg Rusedski, who blew his cool and a 5-2 third-set lead and never won another game. In a battle of two of tennis' fastest servers, Roddick advanced to the third round with a 7-6 (4)
SPORTS
By Lisa Dillman and Lisa Dillman,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 22, 2003
WIMBLEDON, England - You would expect the line - or the queue, as they say around here - of willing-and-able coaches to stretch into the distance when word went out that 20-year-old Andy Roddick was searching for a replacement after recently parting with Tarik Benhabiles. So, Roddick called the home of the guy at the top of the list. And promptly heard the dial tone. They always say rejection is only a phone call away. Kidding aside, the 6-year-old daughter of Brad Gilbert does what kids often do when they pick up the phone and Mom or Dad isn't home.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,SUN STAFF | September 3, 2002
NEW YORK - Pete Sampras brought his happy heart and big serve into the third round of the U.S. Open last night, hoping for a bit of the old magic. He told everyone early on here that he still has the game at the age of 31 to win another Grand Slam. It would be No. 14, should he get it. Last night, under the lights at Louis Armstrong Stadium, he met No. 33 Greg Rusedski, a determined Brit who didn't believe it before the match and still didn't believe it afterward. Together, in front of a Sampras-partial crowd, they tangoed into a fifth and deciding set, Sampras rolling his shoulders between points and Rusedski touching his socks for luck after every point.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,SUN STAFF | September 2, 2002
NEW YORK -- At the end of a long, rainy afternoon, No. 1 seed Serena Williams strolled onto the Arthur Ashe Stadium Court in her baby-pink and black tennis outfit. She brightened the day for fans, who had hung around for 7 1/2 hours hoping to see some tennis. Williams started strong, breaking Daja Bedanova in the first game and going on to win, 6-1, 6-1. It was the only match that was finished before rain returned to the National Tennis Center. Out on Louis Armstrong Stadium, No. 17 Pete Sampras and No. 33 Greg Rusedski were engaged in a competitive match.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,SUN STAFF | September 7, 1997
NEW YORK -- No. 13 seed Patrick Rafter watched Michael Chang's amazing forehand passing shot scoot off the court like a comet, saw Chang go into a frenzy -- jumping up and down, shaking his racket, his fist, his entire being.Rafter watched and mentally cringed. It was, after all, the start of the third set of their U.S. Open men's semifinal and Chang, the No. 2 seed who is known for five-set comebacks, was getting pumped."I thought the whole thing was going to turn around right there," Rafter said, running his hand through his wet, dark hair.
SPORTS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 4, 1999
BIRMINGHAM, England -- Tim and Greg. Greg and Tim. They are the reason tennis is a year-round talking point again in Britain, and the reason the capacity of the National Indoor Arena here had to be expanded twice to meet ticket demand for this first-round Davis Cup match against the United States.Yesterday, Tim Henman and Greg Rusedski played well enough together to ensure that those ticket-holders won't have to watch meaningless tennis today.Their 3-6, 7-5, 6-3, 6-7 (5-7), 6-3 victory over Todd Martin and Alex O'Brien narrowed the Americans' lead to 2-1 in this rematch of the first Davis Cup series in 1900.
SPORTS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | July 3, 2002
WIMBLEDON, England - He used to change his hair color like other guys changed their shirts, used to skip practice, used to have an attitude, used to carry a label as a flashy tennis player of promise. But Xavier Malisse of Belgium never really found any tennis success until he decided to get serious about his sport. And yesterday, the 21-year-old, ponytailed swashbuckler packed his revived career into a one-set showdown with Britain's Greg Rusedski. On Centre Court, facing a crowd of flag-waving British fans, Malisse was trying to close out a match that was tied at two sets apiece when darkness descended Monday.
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