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By HAROLD JACKSON | April 5, 1998
HOWARD county residents played prominent roles at a recent conference organized by the Home Builders Association of Maryland, "Managing Growth in Maryland." Earl Armiger, former president of the Howard County Homebuilders Association, moderated the event at the University of Maryland, College Park. Alton Scavo, a Rouse Co. executive, and Joseph Rutter, director of planning and zoning for Howard, were on panels that discussed development.Mr. Scavo's remarks were particularly interesting as he lamented the lack of comprehensive development projects such as the planned town of Columbia.
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NEWS
April 28, 2013
The Maryland General Assembly has wisely reaffirmed the importance of maintaining Program Open Space, the state's premier program to conserve land and create recreation areas, as a dedicated fund based on revenues from the transfer of real estate ("Crunching numbers on Maryland's land," April 18). While the legislature cut Rural Legacy and the Maryland Agricultural Land Preservation Fund by $9 million, we were pleased the assembly rejected a restructuring of land conservation programs proposed by the Department of Legislative Services.
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NEWS
By Anne Haddad and Anne Haddad,SUN STAFF | December 16, 1999
The state Board of Public Works approved yesterday three more Carroll County farms for preservation through the year-old Rural Legacy state grant program.The Rural Legacy program is the state's second and newest preservation initiative. It provides money to buy easements on farms and other rural areas so that they are protected from development by current and future owners.Carroll purchased development rights this fall through easements on two farms near New Windsor, where the county is focusing its Rural Legacy efforts.
NEWS
January 25, 2013
Maryland's land conservation programs do much more than protect our state's natural resources. They also create jobs and fuel economic growth. That is why we heartily support their full funding in this year's budget ("O'Malley offers $37.3 billion plan," Jan. 17). Research shows that towns located near state parks benefit greatly from the parks' proximity. Business people in these towns report that park visitors often shop in the town and patronize restaurants and hotels. Other studies document that investments in land conservation generate as much as a 10-to-1 return in the form of public benefits, including jobs in tourism, agriculture and forestry.
NEWS
By Mike Burns | June 21, 1998
ROCK-SOLID Republican Carroll County feels slighted by the rock-solid Democratic grip on state government. Like Rodney Dangerfield, the county feels it gets no respect.Carroll leaders groused about their limited share of school construction funds and school budget aid. And about their thin slice of public safety funds.Now they are upset with the state's Rural Legacy grants to preserve important open space and farm lands. Carroll's applications for land protection projects totaled $9 million.
NEWS
By Ben Piven and Ben Piven,SUN STAFF | June 28, 2002
Conservationists welcomed yesterday the latest Maryland Rural Legacy grants for Baltimore County - $3 million to protect land in the northwest and northeast sections of the county. "I'm very pleased. This is more than we got last year, and we've got people lined up to join the program," said Jim Constable, president of the Manor Conservancy land trust group, which works with the county to encourage landowners to preserve open space. The organization helps individuals sell or donate development rights.
NEWS
June 11, 1998
THIS WEEK and next, Gov. Parris N. Glendening is announcing the first round of cash awards for his Rural Legacy land preservation program. All Marylanders have an interest in this effort, whether or not they live in rural areas.None of us want our children and grandchildren to inherit a state strewn with highways and housing developments. But if trends do not change, Central Maryland alone will lose as much land to development in the next 25 years as it has since the state's founding.The Rural Legacy program is an important component of the governor's "smart growth" initiative, designed to direct building to developed areas.
NEWS
By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,SUN STAFF | June 7, 1999
In an effort to show off Baltimore County's scenic northern valleys and promote rural conservation throughout the state, the Valleys Planning Council and Baltimore Bicycling Club plan a 36-mile ride through the Piney Run watershed this month.The ride June 26 will wind through the rolling countryside, stopping at a dairy farm, a foxhound kennel and an alpaca farm."We designed it to showcase the variety of topography and the various kinds of agriculture in the area," said Jack Dillon, director of the Valleys Planning Council, a land preservation organization.
NEWS
By Brenda J. Buote and Brenda J. Buote,SUN STAFF | August 6, 1999
The Carroll commissioners yesterday took the first step toward their goal of preserving 1,000 acres along Little Pipe Creek, near the historic towns of Union Bridge and New Windsor.The three-member Board of County Commissioners unanimously approved seven applications to the state's Rural Legacy program. It is expected to take the state's rural legacy and public works boards about two months to review the documents.Approval by state officials would give the county commissioners permission to spend about $1.4 million to protect 634 acres in the Little Pipe Creek watershed, a 35,000-acre area on the western edge of the county.
NEWS
By Donna R. Engle and Donna R. Engle,SUN STAFF | December 26, 1997
Carroll's commissioners will decide next month whether to earmark $1 million to improve the county's chance of sharing in a $24 million state program to save Maryland farms and woodlands from development.The Rural Legacy program, part of Gov. Parris N. Glendening's Smart Growth initiative, will provide the money over the next two fiscal years to buy development rights from property owners who agree to keep the land in agriculture, forest, wetlands or waterfront buffers.The County Commissioners rejected an initial request to set aside $500,000 in local agricultural preservation funds in each of the next two fiscal years for Rural Legacy.
NEWS
April 2, 2012
Unless the House of Delegates reverses a Senate decision, Maryland's legislature will undermine the widely popular effort to create new places for outdoor recreation, as well as efforts to protect Maryland's best farmlands and forests. This decision would impact Maryland's residents and visitors alike by taking money set aside for land conservation and using it instead to pay for storm water projects. The Senate voted to raid all the land conservation programs. They took $26 million of the Program Open Space money, took money that was supposed to be paid back to Program Open Space and the Maryland Agricultural Land Protection Foundation, and completely defunded the Rural Legacy program.
NEWS
By Tyeesha Dixon and Tyeesha Dixon,tyeesha.dixon@baltsun.com | April 19, 2009
Gov. Martin O'Malley has announced approval of conservation easements that will preserve a 70-acre property in the county. The Board of Public Works approved four easements statewide, totaling 460 acres, including Anne Arundel County's South Rural Legacy Area. The Anne Arundel easement, which preserves 24 acres of woodland and 40 acres of cropland near the border of Calvert County, will be held by the county. The South County property is part of a farmland base that produces corn and soybeans.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,Sun Reporter | July 27, 2008
On the wall maps in the county's land preservation office, the color green marks the nearly 45,000 acres that are permanently safeguarded from development. "I want to make my map greener," said William D. Amoss, manager of the county's agricultural and historic preservation program. "The more options we have for preservation, the better it is for landowners." Now the County Council has given the program another option. By designating the Deer Creek Valley as a priority preservation area, the council has made it easier for the county to create a belt of preserved land that could extend from the Susquehanna River across northern Harford and into Baltimore County.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,Sun Reporter | May 27, 2007
Andrew "Chap" Cummings has lived his 90 years in the same historic Harford County home overlooking Deer Creek, and he has worked the land for most of his life. "From every window he looks out, he has a fabulous view of the creek and the valley," said his daughter, Susan Cummings of Bowie. To preserve that view and safeguard the land along Sandy Hook Road in Street from encroaching residential development, Andrew Cummings has placed all 91.5 acres in the state's Rural Legacy program. "Dad was born there, worked hard all his life there, and he wants to keep this land in farming," his daughter said.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,Sun Reporter | May 20, 2007
A new study showing the Deer Creek watershed to be a vital natural resource, but one that is vulnerable to development pressures, will boost Harford County's efforts to secure state land preservation money, county officials say. About 40,000 acres, slightly less than half of the 86,000 acres in the watershed, are eligible for preservation funding through the state's Rural Legacy program. Most of that acreage is in the eastern area, near Churchville and Darlington. Because the competition for developable land closer to Bel Air is intense, the county wants additional funds if it is to acquire land for preservation, county officials say. Officials in Harford, which received $2 million last year in Rural Legacy funds, want the state to expand the amount of watershed land eligible for state preservation money, extending the boundary north to the Pennsylvania line and placing the entire Harford area of the watershed in the program.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,sun reporter | September 24, 2006
A $2 million state grant will help Harford County preserve more farmland along Deer Creek and the Susquehanna River and ultimately protect the Chesapeake Bay. "It is the most we have ever received in any one year and brings to $7 million the amount we have received from Rural Legacy," said William D. Amoss, manager of the county's agricultural preservation program. "We could hypothetically add 200 more acres and fill in a lot of blanks on our preservation map." The state awarded more than $26 million last week to preservation projects across Maryland, including Harford's Lower Deer Creek valley.
NEWS
April 1, 1998
TWO YEARS AGO, several Carroll County mayors suggested the state create a Transfer Development Rights program to ease pressure on farmers to sell their land to developers.A state commission on economic and planning issues is preparing such a plan for Gov. Parris N. Glendening. It has some serious questions to address.As John Colvin, a developer in Baltimore and Harford counties, explained during a conference held last week by the Home Builders Association of Maryland, the state, through its Rural Legacy program, would buy per-acre development density rights from farmers.
NEWS
By Brenda J. Buote and Brenda J. Buote,SUN STAFF | January 17, 2002
The Carroll County commissioners hope to win $2.75 million in state funding to enhance their efforts to protect farmland in the Liberty watershed, a sensitive environmental area facing development pressure. The commissioners voted yesterday to apply for $5.6 million in state Rural Legacy money. About $2.85 million would be used to protect farmland in the Little Pipe Creek watershed. The remaining funds would aid preservation efforts in the Liberty watershed, an area the county calls the Upper Patapsco.
NEWS
By MARIE GULLARD and MARIE GULLARD,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 29, 2006
Along a winding country highway in Carroll County, a bright red barn appears planted in the middle of a bend in the road. On closer approach, the structure recedes into a large parcel that also contains several circa-1800 outbuildings, including a smokehouse and a summer kitchen. A Victorian-style farmhouse -- modern in design and construction, yet integrated with the surrounding structures -- sits several yards beyond the barn and outbuildings. Noticeable features of the vinyl-sided home are its white wraparound porch, green shutters on long, narrow windows and its fabricated fieldstone front.
NEWS
By MARY GAIL HARE and MARY GAIL HARE,SUN REPORTER | January 29, 2006
Commissioner Julia Walsh Gouge had heard the good news minutes before Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. made the announcements on land preservation funds at an Upperco farm last week. "I just found out what we are getting," said Gouge, smiling broadly. Carroll County's share of the more than $14 million in the state's rural legacy funds is $1.5 million. The program, which the state began about eight years ago, provides funds to help protect vast tracts of contiguous land from sprawl and helps steer development to established communities.
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