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By Brenda J. Buote and Brenda J. Buote,SUN STAFF | January 15, 2001
Drawing on its experience teaching children spinning, broom making and other traditional arts, Carroll County Farm Museum hopes to develop a rural heritage program for county students that would allow them to experience what farm life was like a century ago. "We are an educational facility. Our mission is to teach people about Carroll's rural heritage," museum Administrator Dottie Freeman said. "For years, it has been my dream, my goal, to have children spend a day at the museum and learn through first-hand experience what is was like to live on a farm in the 1800s."
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NEWS
By Chris Guy and Chris Guy,Sun reporter | March 15, 2008
MASSEY -- Sean Jones surveys the lush green expanse of ripening winter wheat that his dairy herd will be munching all year. Fourteen hundred acres - looking in any direction, it's pretty much all you can see. This uninterrupted vista is what convinced the Jones clan (including Sean's parents, two brothers and their families) to pull up stakes in 1995, swapping their farm near Mount Holly, N.J., to come here to Kent County, one of the remaining spots on the East Coast where farming endures as the cornerstone of a rural way of life.
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NEWS
By JAMIE STIEHM and JAMIE STIEHM,SUN REPORTER | March 29, 2006
The winner of a South Anne Arundel County flag contest remembers being awe-struck at her first view of the Chesapeake Bay when she was a young woman taking a freighter trip from San Francisco to Baltimore. Then and there, she fell in love with its majestic looks. "It was a three-week trip on a working freighter and up on the bridge I saw the bay at night," Nancy Lee Young of Deale recalled. "I was absolutely hooked on the Chesapeake Bay from 1953 on." Young's simple design for a flag depicting South County life was recently named the winner in a competition held by the Shady Side Rural Heritage Society.
NEWS
By JAMIE STIEHM and JAMIE STIEHM,SUN REPORTER | March 29, 2006
The winner of a South Anne Arundel County flag contest remembers being awe-struck at her first view of the Chesapeake Bay when she was a young woman taking a freighter trip from San Francisco to Baltimore. Then and there, she fell in love with its majestic looks. "It was a three-week trip on a working freighter and up on the bridge I saw the bay at night," Nancy Lee Young of Deale recalled. "I was absolutely hooked on the Chesapeake Bay from 1953 on." Young's simple design for a flag depicting South County life was recently named the winner in a competition held by the Shady Side Rural Heritage Society.
NEWS
September 25, 1992
"Captain Salem Avery House, Its History 1860-1990," by Virginia White Fitz, is the history of the Shady Side Rural Heritage Society Museum and the former inhabitants of the house.The book will be released at the museum's grand opening, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., Sept. 26,. and noon to 5 p.m., Sept. 27.Its publication was made possible in part by a grant from the Annapolis Federal Savings and Loan Association.Publication was also helped by a gift from F. Ethel Andrews, in recognition of the Society's contribution to the publication of her book, "Miss Ethel Remembers," which was released last year on her 100th birthday.
NEWS
September 12, 1990
Ralph Avery Kirchner of Arnold will present his family Bible to the Capt. Salem Avery House Museum in Shady Side, during a reception at 7 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 22 to honor retiring County Executive O. James Lighthizer, in recognition of of his support of the Shady Side Rural Heritage Society in the establishment of the museum.An inscription on the flyleaf of the Bible reads, "Presented to Lucretia Avery by Wm. Avery, 1857."Lucretia Avery was the bride of Capt. Salem Avery, and Ralph Avery Kirchner is his great-grandson.
NEWS
By Melinda Rice and Melinda Rice,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 22, 1998
CALLING all artists!The Shady Side Rural Heritage Society is seeking drawings of 12 south county landmarks for inclusion in the 1999 Southern Anne Arundel County calendar.The nonprofit group is publishing the calendar as a joint fund-raiser with the Galesville Heritage Society.The sites selected for this year's calendar are Granny Annie's Shop in Shady Side; Richard's Corner Grill in Shady Side; the Abell Home in West River; the Deale Public Library; St. Mark's Chapel in Deale; Galesville Jail; the Carrie Weedon House in Galesville; Dick and Jane's Farm and Produce Stand in Harwood; Galesville United Methodist Church; the Tenant House on Route 2 in Lothian; Smith's Purchase in Owensville; and Larkin's Hill in Harwood.
NEWS
By Melinda Rice and Melinda Rice,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 6, 1998
A 1961 GRADUATE of Annapolis High School won $320,000 this year from the nonprofit John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation.Annapolis native Elinor Ochs, a professor of linguistics at the University of California in Los Angeles, is one of 29 recipients of grants ranging from $220,000 to $375,000.The MacArthur Foundation was established in 1978 with a bequest from John MacArthur, an eccentric billionaire whose only directive was, "I figured out how to make the money, you boys figure out how to spend it."
NEWS
By Melinda Rice and Melinda Rice,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 14, 1998
Eleven local artists have a date with a calendar.Their work will appear in the 1999 Southern Anne Arundel County Familiar Scenes Calendar, a joint fund-raising effort of the Shady Side Rural Heritage Society and Galesville Heritage Society.Each year, the groups sponsor a contest to choose artwork for the calendar. The societies select South County landmarks for the scenes. Those who aspire to have their work in the calendar draw a designated scene in charcoal or black ink on white paper. Then a panel of artists picks the winners.
NEWS
November 18, 2001
Letting government decide where growth occurs isn't too smart Tom Horton believes that Smart Growth will "revitalize towns and cities, protect the Chesapeake Bay, save taxpayers billions and preserve Maryland's rural heritage" ("Sprawl defies good intentions," Nov. 9). Smart Growth will never deliver on any of these promises. The idea that it saves taxpayers money must refer to the myth that suburbs are more expensive to maintain than cities. This simply isn't true. Taxpayers continue, for instance, to pay for two large sports stadiums and a light rail system, all of which were promoted as necessary to restore Baltimore to greatness.
TRAVEL
By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,SUN STAFF | August 7, 2005
Making my way through the Brattleboro-area farmers' market on a glossy Saturday morning, I found an international feast of offerings: slow-roasted Moroccan olives, farmstead cheeses, pear tarts, almond horns, sweet and hot garlic jelly, Malawian sweet potato stew and Thai rice cakes. Then I spotted a beatific young pregnant woman with flowing hair and a long, loose dress moving through the crowd. It seemed as if the 1960s had returned in this southern Vermont town - but with much better food.
NEWS
By Diane Mikulis and Diane Mikulis,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 25, 2003
WHEN CREATED in 1990, the Howard County Conservancy was little more than a legal entity. Its three board members served as overseers of open land placed into a land trust. The work was important in preserving the rural character of Howard County, but not very visible to most people. Since that time, the conservancy - which used to function out of private homes - has acquired a headquarters, hired a staff and reached out to the community to educate and involve thousands of people in conservation.
NEWS
November 18, 2001
Letting government decide where growth occurs isn't too smart Tom Horton believes that Smart Growth will "revitalize towns and cities, protect the Chesapeake Bay, save taxpayers billions and preserve Maryland's rural heritage" ("Sprawl defies good intentions," Nov. 9). Smart Growth will never deliver on any of these promises. The idea that it saves taxpayers money must refer to the myth that suburbs are more expensive to maintain than cities. This simply isn't true. Taxpayers continue, for instance, to pay for two large sports stadiums and a light rail system, all of which were promoted as necessary to restore Baltimore to greatness.
NEWS
By Brenda J. Buote and Brenda J. Buote,SUN STAFF | January 15, 2001
Drawing on its experience teaching children spinning, broom making and other traditional arts, Carroll County Farm Museum hopes to develop a rural heritage program for county students that would allow them to experience what farm life was like a century ago. "We are an educational facility. Our mission is to teach people about Carroll's rural heritage," museum Administrator Dottie Freeman said. "For years, it has been my dream, my goal, to have children spend a day at the museum and learn through first-hand experience what is was like to live on a farm in the 1800s."
NEWS
By Melinda Rice and Melinda Rice,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 14, 1998
Eleven local artists have a date with a calendar.Their work will appear in the 1999 Southern Anne Arundel County Familiar Scenes Calendar, a joint fund-raising effort of the Shady Side Rural Heritage Society and Galesville Heritage Society.Each year, the groups sponsor a contest to choose artwork for the calendar. The societies select South County landmarks for the scenes. Those who aspire to have their work in the calendar draw a designated scene in charcoal or black ink on white paper. Then a panel of artists picks the winners.
NEWS
By Melinda Rice and Melinda Rice,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 6, 1998
A 1961 GRADUATE of Annapolis High School won $320,000 this year from the nonprofit John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation.Annapolis native Elinor Ochs, a professor of linguistics at the University of California in Los Angeles, is one of 29 recipients of grants ranging from $220,000 to $375,000.The MacArthur Foundation was established in 1978 with a bequest from John MacArthur, an eccentric billionaire whose only directive was, "I figured out how to make the money, you boys figure out how to spend it."
NEWS
By Diane Mikulis and Diane Mikulis,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 25, 2003
WHEN CREATED in 1990, the Howard County Conservancy was little more than a legal entity. Its three board members served as overseers of open land placed into a land trust. The work was important in preserving the rural character of Howard County, but not very visible to most people. Since that time, the conservancy - which used to function out of private homes - has acquired a headquarters, hired a staff and reached out to the community to educate and involve thousands of people in conservation.
NEWS
By Chris Guy and Chris Guy,Sun reporter | March 15, 2008
MASSEY -- Sean Jones surveys the lush green expanse of ripening winter wheat that his dairy herd will be munching all year. Fourteen hundred acres - looking in any direction, it's pretty much all you can see. This uninterrupted vista is what convinced the Jones clan (including Sean's parents, two brothers and their families) to pull up stakes in 1995, swapping their farm near Mount Holly, N.J., to come here to Kent County, one of the remaining spots on the East Coast where farming endures as the cornerstone of a rural way of life.
NEWS
By Melinda Rice and Melinda Rice,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 22, 1998
CALLING all artists!The Shady Side Rural Heritage Society is seeking drawings of 12 south county landmarks for inclusion in the 1999 Southern Anne Arundel County calendar.The nonprofit group is publishing the calendar as a joint fund-raiser with the Galesville Heritage Society.The sites selected for this year's calendar are Granny Annie's Shop in Shady Side; Richard's Corner Grill in Shady Side; the Abell Home in West River; the Deale Public Library; St. Mark's Chapel in Deale; Galesville Jail; the Carrie Weedon House in Galesville; Dick and Jane's Farm and Produce Stand in Harwood; Galesville United Methodist Church; the Tenant House on Route 2 in Lothian; Smith's Purchase in Owensville; and Larkin's Hill in Harwood.
NEWS
By TaNoah Morgan and TaNoah Morgan,SUN STAFF | March 19, 1998
If it's rusty, dusty and came from Grandma's, it just might be an antique and this weekend you can find out what it's worth.The Shady Side Rural Heritage Society is gathering appraisers and auctioneers at the Captain Salem Avery House waterman's museum at 7: 30 p.m. tomorrow to price anything old -- from Victorian-era sugar dishes to tin signs advertising 5-cent Coca-Cola.In four years of the program at the museum, the original West River home of the 19th-century ship captain adorned with replicas of schooners and antique household items, the group has come across only a few rare finds.
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