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NEWS
June 20, 1999
There is increasing awareness of the important role of women in the business world and their effect on America's economy. Women-owned businesses are growing in number, range, diversity and earning power. As women business owners expand their companies, they contribute to the country's economic success. With Maryland home to 121,177 women-owned businesses, according to the U.S. Department of Commerce, the need to cultivate women-owned businesses in rural areas is visible by its potential for economic growth.
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NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | March 4, 2014
Gov. Martin O'Malley's proposed increase in Maryland's minimum wage to $10.10 cleared its first hurdle Monday night as a House committee approved the bill and rejected a proposal to set a different standard for rural areas. The House Economic Matters Committee voted 13-8 to send the measure - with significant changes -- to the full House. Before doing so, it amended the bill to eliminate a provision calling for the minimum wage to be increased automatically to keep pace with inflation after reaching $10.10 on Jan. 2017.
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NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Brenda J. Buote and Mary Gail Hare and Brenda J. Buote,SUN STAFF | April 2, 2002
Concerned about the short supply of water in Carroll's rural villages and the increasing demand for new homes in such remote locations, county fire officials are calling for tougher restrictions on developers. Among the recommendations is a requirement that developers provide a source of water - such as an underground tank or an easily accessible pond - that could be tapped in an emergency. "We are telling county government that we don't have the water capacity and that this is a countywide problem," said Doug Alexander, deputy chief of Mount Airy Fire Department and member of the rural water supply committee for the county Fire Chiefs Association.
NEWS
Susan Reimer | March 4, 2013
We are pretty sure of our stereotypes in this country, and we hold them close. One of them is that teen pregnancy is an inner-city problem, a poor problem, a black problem. Another is that "rural" equals "farm," and life there is wholesome and God-fearing. Like so many of the things we believe to be true, these aren't. Not exactly. New research from the National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy reveals that the teen birth rate is a third higher in rural counties than in other areas of the country, regardless of age, race or ethnicity.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | July 22, 2011
A group of local governments in Central Maryland awarded contracts this week to four companies that will help build a high-speed broadband Internet system in the state to improve communications among public agencies, as well as upgrade telecommunications in rural areas. S&N Communications Inc., KCI Convergent Technologies Inc., Henkels & McCoy Inc. and Southern Maryland Cable Inc. won construction contracts to link and improve Internet speeds for local government offices, schools, hospitals, and emergency communication, according to Howard County Executive Ken Ulman's office.
NEWS
By Dan Berger | October 7, 1998
This election is turning into a referendum on whether to impeach the president. People with views had better turn out; the other side will.In the current crisis, whom they ought to impeach is any Congress member who won't pay the U.S. share of the IMF.OAKurt will endorse Parris only if that guarantees his defeat.Bawlmer County is worried about overbuilding in rural areas -- a little late in the game.Pub Date: 10/07/98
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | December 13, 2012
Readers in rural areas have an opportunity to see hundreds of meteors streaking across the sky Thursday and Friday nights, thanks to the annual Geminid shower as well as a potential second shower. The Geminids, which appear to emanate from the constellation Gemini, peak in the wee hours of Friday morning but have already been providing a show around the world the past couple of nights. They could appear at a rate of 120 per hour in rural areas, according to NASA . Meanwhile, astronomers are eyeing a second potential band of debris in space that could create even more meteors.
NEWS
February 21, 2012
There has been a lot of discussion and controversy in the Maryland General Assembly and in the counties about growth-related strategies. Some say they take away private rights; others, that these strategies save money and protect our water. Since we all want to have clean water and save on government expenditures, why not support smart growth initiatives? There is an effort to do this through bills in the legislature, House Bill 445 and Senate Bill 236. Both these measures call for managing growth by limiting sprawl development.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser | michael.dresser@baltsun.com | March 6, 2010
Maryland will receive an additional $26.3 million in federal stimulus money for transit improvements ranging from buses in rural areas to better speakers at MARC stations, U.S. Transportation Secretary Ray LaHood announced Friday. According to the U.S. Transportation Department, the Maryland Transit Administration will receive the following grants: •$17.1 million toward rebuilding the bus loop at the MTA's Mondawmin Transit Center; heating and ventilation upgrades; light rail yard switch upgrades and replacement or overhaul of 24 rail substation circuit breakers.
NEWS
by Annie Linskey | March 23, 2012
Gov. Martin O'Malley's attempt to limit sprawl would be vastly weakened under an amendment offered on the Senate floor this morning by Sen. Thomas "Mac" Middleton. The changes would leave more control of zoning in local hands, allowing them to have the final say as to whether vast portions of farmlands and forests are eligible for large developments. "I think it seriously weakens the effort" to control development, said Sen. Paul Pinsky, the floor leader for the bill. O'Malley's legislation is intended to curb growth in rural areas by limiting where septic systems could be installed.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | December 13, 2012
Readers in rural areas have an opportunity to see hundreds of meteors streaking across the sky Thursday and Friday nights, thanks to the annual Geminid shower as well as a potential second shower. The Geminids, which appear to emanate from the constellation Gemini, peak in the wee hours of Friday morning but have already been providing a show around the world the past couple of nights. They could appear at a rate of 120 per hour in rural areas, according to NASA . Meanwhile, astronomers are eyeing a second potential band of debris in space that could create even more meteors.
EXPLORE
April 15, 2012
Baltimore County Police are investigating a single vehicle crash that killed two people late Saturday, April 14, in the area of Falls Road at Beckleysville Road near the northwestern edge of the county. Police said the incident occurred on April 14, at 10 p.m. Police responded to the intersection of Falls Road and Beckleysville Road, west of Prettyboy Reservoir, and found a 1994 Honda Civic at the location. Investigation revealed that the vehicle was traveling southbound on Falls Road, when the driver lost control of the car, left the roadway, and rolled the vehicle.
NEWS
by Annie Linskey | March 23, 2012
Gov. Martin O'Malley's attempt to limit sprawl would be vastly weakened under an amendment offered on the Senate floor this morning by Sen. Thomas "Mac" Middleton. The changes would leave more control of zoning in local hands, allowing them to have the final say as to whether vast portions of farmlands and forests are eligible for large developments. "I think it seriously weakens the effort" to control development, said Sen. Paul Pinsky, the floor leader for the bill. O'Malley's legislation is intended to curb growth in rural areas by limiting where septic systems could be installed.
NEWS
February 21, 2012
There has been a lot of discussion and controversy in the Maryland General Assembly and in the counties about growth-related strategies. Some say they take away private rights; others, that these strategies save money and protect our water. Since we all want to have clean water and save on government expenditures, why not support smart growth initiatives? There is an effort to do this through bills in the legislature, House Bill 445 and Senate Bill 236. Both these measures call for managing growth by limiting sprawl development.
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | January 24, 2012
Undeterred by accusations he's waging "war on rural Maryland," Gov. Martin O'Malley has revived legislation aimed at curbing sprawling development built with septic systems. The governor's septics bill, part of his legislative package  introduced Monday night in Annapolis, tries a new, more complex "tiered" approach.  It replaces his controversial proposal last year to ban large housing projects using "onsite sewage disposal," which officials say is a growing source of the nutrient pollution fouling the Chesapeake Bay. The new plan would take off on Maryland's 15-year-old Smart Growth policies and impose increasingly stringent restrictions on the use of septic systems the farther new housing would be built from existing cities, towns and unincorporated communities.   It's an approach recommended by a 28-member task force he appointed to study the issue after legislative leaders shelved his earlier bill.  It remains to be seen if the new proposal will quell the outcry from developers and rural and suburban officials that septic limits will kill growth in their communities.  Instead of banning such development outright, the bill would encourage counties and municipalities to put more growth on centralized sewer systems, while discouraging septic-based construction on farmland and in watershed areas where officials say it's likely to pollute streams and the bay. State officials point to data...
NEWS
Dan Rodricks, The Baltimore Sun | January 23, 2012
Nobody asked me but . . . This news, via MarylandReporter.com, might come as a shock to members of the General Assembly who believe the O'Malley administration is waging a "war on rural Maryland": A poll by OpinionWorks finds that 62 percent of registered voters in rural areas favor tighter regulations on septic systems while 57 percent favor "limiting the number of septic systems in rural areas. " Statewide support for tighter septic restrictions was 72 percent, with support for limiting new systems as 69 percent.
NEWS
June 11, 1998
THIS WEEK and next, Gov. Parris N. Glendening is announcing the first round of cash awards for his Rural Legacy land preservation program. All Marylanders have an interest in this effort, whether or not they live in rural areas.None of us want our children and grandchildren to inherit a state strewn with highways and housing developments. But if trends do not change, Central Maryland alone will lose as much land to development in the next 25 years as it has since the state's founding.The Rural Legacy program is an important component of the governor's "smart growth" initiative, designed to direct building to developed areas.
NEWS
November 1, 2011
In regard to your editorial, "Defenders of sprawl" (Oct. 31) you are living in a dream world if you believe that "majority of people support a rational discussion of how best to reform land use policies of the past. " The majority who support PlanMaryland will not be those that make decisions to implement the plan. In the rural areas, representatives have always supported their constituent farmers who desire at some point to develop their properties. They have also supported those people who purchase houses in the rural area, then desire libraries, community centers, commercial development and wider roads to accommodate the increased traffic that occurs.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | December 29, 2011
Gov. Martin O'Malley promised a vigorous push during the coming legislative session  to curb the proliferation of large housing developments on septic systems, saying that increased pollution from such sources is undermining the progress Maryland is other making on protecting the Chesapeake Bay. The governor took a defiant tone toward critics of his septic-control policies, which have been labeled by some as part of a "war on rural Maryland....
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