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NEWS
July 17, 2011
Rupert Murdoch is in trouble and a whole lot of folks are delighted. They are practically drooling at the mouth that the downfall of Fox News could be around the corner. Members of Congress are calling for an investigation into allegations that the Murdoch-owned News Corp. may have committed criminal acts in the U.S. by hacking into the cell phone voice messages of 9/11 victims. In Britain, News of the World, a Murdoch tabloid, was shut down and the heads of editors are rolling. It seems at the highest levels in Mr. Murdoch's British news empire, there was complicity in this hacking scandal.
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NEWS
By Theodore G. Venetoulis | February 15, 2014
To someone who has been engaged for most of his life in both politics and the media, the parallel story lines of Chris Christie and Rupert Murdoch are fascinating. Both hold reputations as tough, hard-fisted taskmasters - brilliant, successful, in their respective fields: Murdoch as a publisher, Christie as a politician. Until recently, that is. They've stumbled. Some say mightily; others suggest only modestly. Governor Christie and his staff are under investigation for allegedly clogging up bridges, using federal funds inappropriately, bullying local officials and plying friendly politicians with appointments and lucrative projects.
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NEWS
Marta H. Mossburg | July 5, 2011
This just in: With mega disaster MySpace off of News Corp.'s books, chief Rupert Murdoch bets on cleavage, says the following "letter" leaked to press: Dear Ms. Knowles, May I call you Beyoncé? My wife Wendi is a big fan of yours. Her iPod is stacked with your albums. Her favorite song is "Single Ladies (Put a ring on it). " Let me tell you, I did. My reason for writing is Wendi. She thinks I need to capitalize on the "Fox Look" by starting a fashion line. You probably already know this, but I am chairman and chief executive officer of News Corp., parent company of Fox News, The Wall Street Journal, and The New York Post, and I thankfully, finally, offloaded MySpace — my little social networking mistake!
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | April 26, 2013
One of the driving principles in the live and late-breaking world of TV news is to just keep moving on. Don't dwell too long on yesterday's mistakes, or you'll miss today's big story. But the mistakes made by social media and cable TV after the Boston Marathon bombings have continued reverberating with the discovery last week of the body of a young man falsely accused of being a suspect. We saw similar patterns after the Newtown shooting, and we need to look at this trend before the media get any further out of control.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | July 17, 2011
I have been thinking about media and public shame a lot lately. And events this week with Rupert Murdoch globally and Sheila Dixon locally have focused my troubled thoughts. The litany of public figures who have been in the news lately for behaving shamefully is a long and sad one. The indictment of former Democratic presidential candidate John Edwards in June brought back the whole sorry saga of him fathering a child out of wedlock with a campaign videographer as his wife fought a cancer that would claim her life in 2010.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mike Pride and By Mike Pride,Special to the Sun | November 17, 2002
Rupert Murdoch: The Untold Story of the World's Greatest Media Wizard, by Neil Chenoweth. Crown. 352 pages. $27.50. As a driver of globalism, no force is more powerful than the media. They respect no borders, bringing Mickey Mouse to France, capitalism to China and CNN to the hideouts of punk dictators. Their multinational conglomerations wheel and deal over technological advantage, market share and even swaths of sky. By Neil Chenoweth's reckoning, the revolution that has been reshaping the media's power before our eyes is just over a quarter-century old. Chenoweth, author of Rupert Murdoch, puts its beginning point at Sept.
FEATURES
By Bruce McCabe and Bruce McCabe,Boston Globe | May 28, 1995
"Rapist Caught by Own Cat."That headline from the Sun, Rupert Murdoch's London tabloid, writes Robert Sherrill in the current the Nation, is part of the formula that has made it the largest English-language newspaper in the world. The rest of the formula is "nude women on page three, sex advice, fabricated news and racial scares."Mr. Sherrill's dense, splenetic attack on "Citizen Murdoch" cautions that Mr. Murdoch's "empire building on the edge, financial loosey-goosey" has been propped up by the FCC's refusal to strip him of his Fox TV stations even though its May 4 ruling acknowledged him as "an outlaw in the industry."
FEATURES
By Mark Feeney and Mark Feeney,Boston Globe | April 16, 1995
The April GQ is a special issue on "The Future of Sports." Gracing its cover is Detroit Pistons forward Grant Hill, whose unrelentingly good press raises the question whether he's actually Eddie Haskell with a jump shot: "May I pass you the ball, Mrs. Cleaver?"Profiling Rupert Murdoch's increasingly successful efforts to make professional sports another annex of his empire, Charles P. Pierce offers a winningly bilious antidote to the good-conduct-medal gush about Mr. Hill.As a former laborer in one of the darker of the great man's `D satanic mills (Mr. Pierce was a columnist for the Boston Herald when that publication was among the lesser trophies on Mr. Murdoch's mantel)
BUSINESS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | July 30, 2005
NEW YORK - Rupert Murdoch's son and heir apparent at News Corp., Lachlan K. Murdoch, abruptly resigned from his executive posts at the media company yesterday and said he was moving back to Australia with his family. His departure raises fresh questions about executive succession at one of the world's most successful and powerful media companies. Though Rupert Murdoch, 74, has refused to publicly pick a successor, it was widely believed that he favored Lachlan, his oldest son, to replace him as chief executive and chairman upon his retirement.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | July 18, 2011
If you want to get a sense of how desperate things have become in Rupert Murdoch's empire, take a look at this editorial in today's Wall Street Journal. To cast what is happening in the UK -- and what certainly seems headed for the US -- as the work of Murdoch's commercial and ideological enemies might seem mad to reasonable journalists. But not to Murdoch and his chieftans. That is all they seem to know: attack, attack and try to destroy your opponents. Providing reliable and trustworthy information to citizens so that they can make reasoned decisions about their lives is not on this gang's daily to-do list.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and The Baltimore Sun | October 27, 2012
Stan Honey has spent much of the past two decades living a double life - as a computer graphics innovator who made televised sports more easily watchable for the casual fan and as a master yachtsman who navigated large boats to a long list of nautical accomplishments. Honey (pronounced HO-nee), who was inducted this month into the National Sailing Hall of Fame, has finally been able to combine his two seemingly unrelated passions - given that one is usually accomplished sitting in an office while the other takes place on the open seas - in what he has called a "perfect job. " For the past couple of years, Honey has been working with the U.S. organizing committee of the 2013 America's Cup as its technical director, and has helped develop a tracking system, in much the same way he has done for fans watching football, baseball and hockey.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | July 27, 2011
Last Sunday, I wrote about the way in which British tabloid values had already taken root in American media and corroded the soul of our press. I was challenging the conventional wisdom here that our journalistic standards are somehow vastly superior to those of the British. I think too many analysts are using the News of the World scandal to support that false belief. I am hoping we can use the discussion to help us pull back from the values Rupert Murdoch had helped import.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik, The Baltimore Sun | July 22, 2011
As the scandal that sunk Rupert Murdoch's News of the World continued to unfold last week, one of the questions that loomed was whether there would be any fallout on this side of the Atlantic. What most American analysts were wondering was whether evidence would show that employees in Britain or at one of Murdoch's U.S. properties like the New York Post had hacked into the voice mails of family members or victims of the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks — or paid off police for information on celebrities and others here or abroad.
NEWS
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | July 19, 2011
UPDATE (11:55 a.m.): The hearing was abruptly interrupted, and the camera went to a blank wall as a result of a disturbance in the hearing room at about 11:55 a.m. as the last questioner was addressing a question to Rupert Murdoch.  A replay of video showed a  spectator approaching Rupert Murdoch with a plate of white shaving cream. A CNN staffer in the room reports that the shaving cream hit Murdoch "squarely in the face. " Murdoch's wife, Wendi Deng, leapt to her husband's defense by throwing a punch at the man. Murdoch did not seem injured, and the spectator was removed by police.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | July 18, 2011
If you want to get a sense of how desperate things have become in Rupert Murdoch's empire, take a look at this editorial in today's Wall Street Journal. To cast what is happening in the UK -- and what certainly seems headed for the US -- as the work of Murdoch's commercial and ideological enemies might seem mad to reasonable journalists. But not to Murdoch and his chieftans. That is all they seem to know: attack, attack and try to destroy your opponents. Providing reliable and trustworthy information to citizens so that they can make reasoned decisions about their lives is not on this gang's daily to-do list.
NEWS
July 17, 2011
Rupert Murdoch is in trouble and a whole lot of folks are delighted. They are practically drooling at the mouth that the downfall of Fox News could be around the corner. Members of Congress are calling for an investigation into allegations that the Murdoch-owned News Corp. may have committed criminal acts in the U.S. by hacking into the cell phone voice messages of 9/11 victims. In Britain, News of the World, a Murdoch tabloid, was shut down and the heads of editors are rolling. It seems at the highest levels in Mr. Murdoch's British news empire, there was complicity in this hacking scandal.
NEWS
By Jeffrey M. Landaw | September 14, 1997
Rupert Murdoch's Fox Group agreed to buy the Dodgers 40 years, almost to the day, after they and the Giants left New York for the West Coast.The Sun's Peter Schmuck probably spoke for most people outside New York when he wrote Sept. 5: "The late Walter O'Malley is considered the pioneer who turned Major League Baseball into a truly national pastime when he moved the team from Brooklyn to Los Angeles."Nobody disputes that the major leagues needed to establish themselves outside the Northeast, and that San Francisco and Los Angeles deserved big-league ball clubs (well, I cling to the stereotype that Los Angeles fans will leave a double no-hitter in the seventh inning to beat the traffic to the beach, but let that go)
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | July 17, 2011
I have been thinking about media and public shame a lot lately. And events this week with Rupert Murdoch globally and Sheila Dixon locally have focused my troubled thoughts. The litany of public figures who have been in the news lately for behaving shamefully is a long and sad one. The indictment of former Democratic presidential candidate John Edwards in June brought back the whole sorry saga of him fathering a child out of wedlock with a campaign videographer as his wife fought a cancer that would claim her life in 2010.
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