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Runoff

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NEWS
March 3, 2010
Mandating a runoff fee that is the same for all homeowners in a jurisdiction is patently inequitable taxation ("Fees statewide proposed to cut runoff pollution," Mar. 3). There is no justification for charging the same amount for a large property in Mt. Washington or Roland Park and a small one in Pigtown that might have less than a tenth the area. No matter how small the fee, it is unjustly applied. It would make far more sense to make a minor addition to the property assessment worksheet and generate the needed revenue for runoff remediation through a calculation that bears some rational relationship to the size and physical characteristics of the properties producing runoff.
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FEATURES
By Ellen Nibali and For The Baltimore Sun | October 2, 2014
A soil test recommended adding a lot of phosphorus to my new shrub bed this spring. The soil was very low in phosphorus, and I worked it in well before planting. Should I add more this fall? It's good that you thoroughly worked the phosphorus into the soil, because phosphorus is one of the big polluters of the Chesapeake Bay. It's important to prevent it from being washed into storm drains or waterways that lead to the bay. Phosphorus binds with soil and is not volatile like nitrogen, so the full application you already made should suffice for years to come.
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FEATURES
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | April 29, 2011
The Belair Edison neighborhood was awarded $31,100 to develop a design for a heavily traveled portion of Erdman Avenue to green the street and control polluted runoff. The neighborhood will work with partners, including business owners, residents and environmental groups on the plan for the grant, administered through the Chesapeake Bay Trust, an independent grant-making organization chartered by the state. The program, paid for by the Trust and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, was created to support street greening projects by urban communities.
NEWS
August 27, 2014
The misinformation in Susan Shaw's letter ( "State should clean up its act Aug. 22) compelled me to write this. She says don't blame commercial real estate for overflows because they don't overflow. She goes on to say the overflows were the state's fault. Actually, the overflows are Baltimore City's fault since its operates the wastewater treatment system where the overflows occurred. But even blaming the city is off the mark. Ms. Shaw fails to recognize a central fact. When it comes to water, everything is downstream.
NEWS
April 24, 2013
Reading about the rain water tax, I see that government buildings do not have to pay this tax. The government evidently knows how to keep their runoff from causing pollution in the Chesapeake Bay. Why not tell the rest of us the secret so we can keep our rain water from being contaminated and the Bay will quickly become pristine clean? Believe that and I'll tell you another one. Mary Chesney Schwind Cockeysville
NEWS
By ASSOCIAATED PRESS | November 10, 1990
PHOENIX (AP) -- The legislature will be called into special session "no later than the 19th" to work on legislation to facilitate a gubernatorial runoff, Gov. Rose Mofford said yesterday.Governor Mofford said after a meeting with legislative leaders that a bill to set the runoff election procedures has been drafted but that no details would be revealed before it was reviewed by House and Senate party caucuses.Republican Fife Symington, who was born in Baltimore and is a Gilman School graduate, beat Democrat Terry Goddard by about 4,000 votes in Tuesday's election, but 11,309 write-in votes for other candidates prevented him from getting the absolute majority of all votes cast that he needed to avoid a runoff under a previously untested amendment to the state constitution.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | October 8, 2001
NEW YORK - A campaign poster for mayoral candidate Fernando "Freddy" Ferrer on a wall of his headquarters identifies him as "A Mayor for All New Yorkers." It bears a silhouette of the Manhattan skyline, complete with the now-vanished twin towers of the World Trade Center. That poster pretty much captures the essential ingredients of Thursday's Democratic primary runoff election between Bronx Borough President Ferrer, seeking to be the city's first Puerto Rican mayor, and Mark Green, the city's elected public advocate, for the right to face Republican Michael Bloomberg on Nov. 6. Before the Sept.
NEWS
October 13, 2000
Baltimore-Washington International Airport would pay $50,000 in civil penalties and agree to pay for a study of nearby streams to settle two lawsuits that alleged the airport allowed toxic de-icing chemicals to flow from runways into the Chesapeake Bay. The agreement is outlined in a consent decree filed last week in U.S. District Court in Baltimore. It could take effect after a 30-day public comment period, with the approval of a federal judge. Under the decree, airport officials do not admit any violations of the Clean Water Act, as alleged in separate lawsuits by the federal government and a New York environmental group.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | December 11, 2003
The Maryland Farm Bureau voted unanimously yesterday to support legislation proposed by Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr.'s administration to limit agricultural runoff into the Chesapeake Bay. The plan - which would simplify existing rules and eliminate a requirement that farmers sign a "right of entry" agreement for state inspectors - has been debated vigorously since the administration presented it Monday in Ocean City. Many farmers wanted more sweeping changes to the 1998 law requiring limits on use of fertilizers and manure on fields.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,Staff Writer | January 7, 1994
The state Aviation Administration will spend $13.4 million over the next two years to reduce by more than half the amount of deicing fluid that drains from runways at Baltimore-Washington International Airport into two streams.One of the streams, Muddy Bridge Branch, is in the Sawmill Creek Watershed, one of four watersheds the state has targeted in its plan to improve water quality in waterways leading to the Chesapeake Bay. The other is Kitten Branch. Water from both eventually flows into the Patapsco River.
FEATURES
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | August 13, 2014
About 100 gallons of diesel fuel spilled from a rooftop generator at Bond Street Wharf into the Fells Point harbor Sunday, Maryland environmental officials said. The fuel leaked into the water from a stormwater outfall at Bond Street, Maryland Department of the Environment spokesman Jay Apperson said. Officials believe 75-100 gallons of the red-dyed fuel reached the Patapsco River. MDE's Emergency Response Division contained the spill with a boom, a temporary floating barrier used to contain oil, and used absorbent materials to recover oil from the water, Apperson said.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | August 11, 2014
Federal regulators approved new pollution limits Monday for Maryland's coastal bays aimed at restoring water quality in the shallow lagoons that serve both as playground for Ocean City vacationers and vital habitat for fish and wildlife. Like the Chesapeake Bay, the state's coastal bays suffer from an overdose of nitrogen and phosphorus, which feed algae blooms and stress fish by depleting levels of dissolved oxygen in the water. The bays have been officially recognized as impaired by nutrient pollution since the mid-1990s.
BUSINESS
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | July 19, 2014
The concrete oozed rather than poured out of the mixer truck, almost as if reluctant to cover the ground - partly because it won't, entirely. Laborers shoveled pebbly gobs around to form a new sidewalk at a park-and-ride lot in Waysons Corner, one of two where the State Highway Administration is laying "pervious" concrete this summer as a test of its environmental friendliness. Porous paving surfaces have been around for decades, but they're expensive and often didn't work well.
NEWS
July 3, 2014
The Maryland and Delaware Atlantic Ocean beach resorts got a bit of good news to kick off the summer season this past week. The latest survey by the National Resources Defense Council rates both states as having some of the cleanest beach water in the country. Based on U.S. Environmental Protection Agency water quality standards for swimmer safety (and the prevalence of disease-causing bacteria or viruses), Maryland had the fourth safest coastal beaches in the country. Delaware was the best overall.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | May 23, 2014
The Chesapeake Bay's health remained steady overall last year, despite heavy rains that normally flush pollution into its waters, University of Maryland scientists reported Friday. Declines in Eastern Shore rivers, however, indicated problems with polluted farm runoff there, researchers said. The bay as a whole earned a 45 percent score, a 'C' grade for the second straight year in the annual ecological health checkup performed by the university's Center for Environmental Science.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | May 23, 2014
Visitors to Cunningham Falls State Park are being warned by the Frederick County Health Department that swimming, wading or splashing at Hunting Creek Lake could make them sick. Heavy rainfall and storm-water runoff have affected the lake's water quality, according to the health department. Park patrons are urged to stay out of the water if they have cuts or open skin wounds, a compromised immune system or young children. If anyone does go in the water, officials recommend scrubbing with anti-bacterial soaps immediately upon getting out of the water.
NEWS
By Eric Siegel and Eric Siegel,SUN STAFF | December 7, 1995
A dismissed department head took his concerns about repairs to a runoff pond at a Baltimore landfill to the city's top officials yesterday, saying the contractor should not be paid more money to fix deficiencies because the work was done improperly.Kenneth J. Strong, fired last month as head of the city's Bureau of Solid Waste, appeared before the Board of Estimates to protest a proposed $41,900 contract with L. F. Mahoney Inc. to make further repairs at a runoff pond at the Quarantine Road Sanitary Landfill in South Baltimore.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | September 18, 1997
NEW YORK -- The Democratic mayoral primary headed for an interim but muddied conclusion last night as the Board of Elections said that Ruth Messinger appeared to have broken the 40 percent barrier, though by fewer than 1,000 votes, and would not have to face the Rev. Al Sharpton in a runoff.Sharpton said he would file suit this morning in state and federal courts to force the board to reinstate the runoff.As of 8: 30 last night, Messinger, according to a still unofficial count, had 40.17 percent of the 410,773 votes that had been tallied, 729 more than the 40 percent threshold.
NEWS
March 14, 2014
Tim Wheeler 's article, "Senators seek to stall pollution regulations" (March 10) misses one critical point: The proposed delays are being driven by re-election priorities, not environmental responsibilities. For decades, scientists and policy makers have been aware that manure runoff is a major cause of pollution to the Chesapeake Bay. Or to be more explicit, this is about how to deal with excessive amounts of chicken poop. The O'Malley administration created the phosphorus management tool as a way to reduce manure application in places where the soil is already saturated.
NEWS
March 5, 2014
The desecration of the pristine farmland to build another industrial site by a development company (or should that be un-development company?) is sad ( "2 large buildings planned in Perryman industrial area," March 4). There are just too many industrial sites and shopping malls. The project should be stopped and the land use remain the same. The accompanying photo is a good example why Gov. Martin O'Malley's "rain" tax is good and necessary in curtailing the excessive water runoff in Maryland.
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