Advertisement
HomeCollectionsRunning Water
IN THE NEWS

Running Water

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
March 6, 2001
A BIG THUMBS down is in order for the state Housing and Community Development Department official who said the agency doesn't want to aggressively market a loan program that would allow people without running water to get it. Why? Because the program's popularity could overwhelm the department and suck up too much staff time, the official said. What nonsense. It's the 21st century. We send objects into space all the time; we can split atoms and instantly message friends around the globe.
ARTICLES BY DATE
EXPLORE
By Louise Vest | September 20, 2011
100 Years Ago H2 Ohhhh! In the classifieds: "For Rent: Blacksmith and Wheelwright Shop and Dwelling House at Cooksville. Best stand in the county. R.H. MERCER. Cooksville, Rd. For Sale: 130 Acre Farm, situated on the Triadelphia Pike, one mile form Frederick Pike. Good Spring close to house, running water in barn. J.S. BROWN, Ellicott City, Md. Route 3. " In the latter ad, it makes sense to have the more efficient watering system for the animal occupants of the barn, who lap it up by the gallons, than for the humans in the home.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Richard Irwin and Richard Irwin,SUN STAFF | January 28, 2003
Three young children were found abandoned yesterday in a filthy West Baltimore rowhouse that had no heat, electricity or running water, and where they apparently had endured at least three days alone amid the coldest weather in recent years, police said. Police said the children - girls ages 3 and 6, and a 5-year-old boy - were taken to the pediatric unit at University of Maryland Medical Center where physical examinations determined they were in good health despite the conditions in the frigid three-story house.
NEWS
September 8, 2011
I live in the Phoenix area of Baltimore County and we didn't get power back in our homes until Sept. 2. I understand that power has to be restored to hospitals, nursing homes, emergency treatment centers and other places of critical importance. But BGE should have given more priority to the homes that depend on well water. When the electricity is out, well pumps do not function, leaving our homes without running water and plumbing as well as power. I prepared for the storm by filling pots and bathtubs with water, but it wasn't enough to carry us through six full days without power.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert and Scott Calvert,SUN STAFF | February 25, 2001
The prettiest snowfall can spell trouble for 87-year-old Cornelius Myers. Even more than a moonless night or driving rain or scorching heat. When it snows, he and his rickety knees must plow a path across his Carroll County back yard. Past the swing, picnic table and shed to what passes for a bathroom - a white portable toilet on the edge of a cornfield. "When you got two feet of snow, you gotta shovel your way out," Myers says, sitting in his easy chair and stroking his gray mustache.
NEWS
By Howard Libit and Howard Libit,SUN STAFF | April 28, 1996
Running water returned to Baltimore's Cherry Hill neighborhood early yesterday, allowing residents once again to take showers, flush toilets and brush their teeth."
NEWS
By Liz F. Kay | February 26, 2008
THE PROBLEM -- A Brooklyn soccer pavilion lacked running water. THE BACKSTORY -- A tipster reported to Watchdog that the William J. Myers Soccer Pavilion in Brooklyn had had no running water for three weeks. After a call to the Baltimore Department of Recreation and Parks, Watchdog discovered that the facility actually had been without water since Feb. 11. When she was reached Thursday, Malkia McLeod, a recreation and parks spokeswoman, wasn't sure what had caused the problem. She said that staff from the city's Department of Public Works had come out to investigate Wednesday.
NEWS
By Norris P. West | March 4, 2001
CAN YOU imagine, even for a second, living in a house without running water? Carting plastic water bottles from a firehouse for cooking, cleaning and eating at home? Heating water on the stove for baths? In your wildest nightmares, can you even consider having to bear winter's cold or summer's heat to go outside to the bathroom? Such was life in 19th century America and even part of this century, but there was a reason someone invented indoor plumbing. Somebody knew that getting water from a faucet and watching it go down the drain was one of the best inventions before sliced bread.
NEWS
By Annette Gooch and Annette Gooch,UNITED PRESS SYNDICATE | September 12, 1999
The picnic season may be over but there are still lots of occasions when stuffed or deviled eggs are called for: bridal and baby shower luncheons, weekend brunches and Tupperware parties.If you can't seem to hard-cook an egg that doesn't end up with a rubbery texture and a greenish-gray ring around the yolk (the result of overheating chemical compounds in the egg), try this approach: Start with eggs that are at least a week old (freshly laid ones resist peeling). Place in a pan with enough cold water to cover eggs by 1 inch and add 2 teaspoons salt per quart of water.
NEWS
By Brenda J. Buote and Brenda J. Buote,SUN STAFF | January 7, 1999
Carroll County youths who play recreational sports might have to pay more than usual this spring to be in the lineup.The county Health Department has asked recreation councils to comply with regulations that would limit items sold at many of Carroll's concession stands. In some cases, the councils would be limited to selling prepackaged foods.No more hot dogs. Nachos would be out also.In Union Bridge, the change is expected to translate into less revenue. As a result, youths will have to buy their pants this spring if they want to play baseball or softball.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance, The Baltimore Sun | August 4, 2011
Images from NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter appear to reveal evidence of liquid water running downhill during the Martian summer. But a device on the orbiter called CRISM, built by scientists at Johns Hopkins' Applied Physics Lab, scanned the stains and found no sign of water. A report in the journal Science Thursday said the MRO team's best guess is that the stains, which lengthen and darken in summer and vanish in winter, are caused by a syrupy brine that dries quickly on the surface.
NEWS
By Liz F. Kay | liz.kay@baltsun.com and Baltimore Sun reporter | March 10, 2010
The water main break that left tens of thousands of Northwest Baltimore County residents without water for days has been repaired and is back in service, according to Baltimore's director of public works. DPW Director David Scott thanked residents for their patience while repairs took place after the break was discovered Saturday. The repairs were completed early Wednesday morning, said DPW spokeswoman Celeste Amato, a full day before the original Thursday estimate. That approximation was based on weather forecasts that called for rain, she said.
NEWS
By Liz F. Kay | February 26, 2008
THE PROBLEM -- A Brooklyn soccer pavilion lacked running water. THE BACKSTORY -- A tipster reported to Watchdog that the William J. Myers Soccer Pavilion in Brooklyn had had no running water for three weeks. After a call to the Baltimore Department of Recreation and Parks, Watchdog discovered that the facility actually had been without water since Feb. 11. When she was reached Thursday, Malkia McLeod, a recreation and parks spokeswoman, wasn't sure what had caused the problem. She said that staff from the city's Department of Public Works had come out to investigate Wednesday.
NEWS
December 14, 2007
Baltimore's decision to begin tapping the Susquehanna River on Tuesday to head off a potential shortage of drinking water next spring illustrates that planning ahead has become crucial in water management. Thanks to such planning by earlier generations, the Baltimore metropolitan area is served by three sizable reservoirs that are the envy of other Maryland cities, which wouldn't be allowed to build one today. And yet in periods of drizzly drought such as these, the reservoirs are not being replenished quickly enough with rainwater to ensure they will have adequate supplies when warmer weather brings higher demand.
NEWS
By Phillip McGowan and Phillip McGowan,Sun reporter | September 16, 2007
Maryland's lieutenant governor is backing a group of developers seeking federal permission to bring water and sewer lines under the Baltimore-Washington Parkway to support a $500 million project of homes and shops near an expanding Fort Meade. In a letter sent to Interior Secretary Dirk Kempthorne, Lt. Gov. Anthony G. Brown said that approving a permit for sewer and water service for Arundel Gateway would boost state efforts to prepare for a military expansion that within four years will bring at least 45,000 jobs and 28,000 households to Maryland.
NEWS
By Guy Keeler and Guy Keeler,Mcclatchy-Tribune | July 29, 2007
Some older people never lose their thirst for adventure. Even with pensions in hand, grandchildren to spoil and the freedom to pursue personal interests, they crave the challenge of meaningful work in foreign lands -- often under primitive living conditions. Sally and John Mincks sold their Fresno, Calif., home so they could spend two years in a Panamanian mountain house without electricity or running water. Winifred Huff of Clovis, Calif., traded her apartment for a house without walls in Samoa.
NEWS
By Ted Kooser | February 25, 2007
My maternal grandparents got their drinking water from a well in the yard, and my disabled uncle carried it sloshing to the house, one bucket of hard red water early every morning. I couldn't resist sharing this lovely little poem by the Minnesota poet Sharon Chmielarz. - Ted Kooser "New Water" All those years - almost a hundred - the farm had hard water. Hard orange. Buckets lined in orange. Sink and tub and toilet, too, once they got running water. And now, in less than a lifetime, just by changing the well's location, in the same yard, mind you, the water's soft, clear, delicious to drink.
NEWS
October 10, 1996
Central Special School is expected to reopen today, with a water tank pumping fresh water into the Edgewater school for NTC severely disabled children.Contractors and school employees were to work through the night to set up the temporary water line with a tanker and pump, said spokeswoman Jane Doyle.The school has been closed for three days because the water supply for the five-school South River complex was found to be contaminated with solvents Oct. 3. Since Friday, bottled water has been in use at the other four schools while water lines were being flushed and water samples tested.
NEWS
By Ted Kooser | February 25, 2007
My maternal grandparents got their drinking water from a well in the yard, and my disabled uncle carried it sloshing to the house, one bucket of hard red water early every morning. I couldn't resist sharing this lovely little poem by the Minnesota poet Sharon Chmielarz. - Ted Kooser "New Water" All those years - almost a hundred - the farm had hard water. Hard orange. Buckets lined in orange. Sink and tub and toilet, too, once they got running water. And now, in less than a lifetime, just by changing the well's location, in the same yard, mind you, the water's soft, clear, delicious to drink.
NEWS
By BRADLEY OLSON | January 8, 2006
So you've wanted to winterize your boat, but the holidays kept getting in the way, right? Or you've been holding out hope for a 50-degree day when you could hit the water before winter fully sets in. Or maybe you just can't bear to stop fishing. Whatever the reason, mechanics and boating experts say, you ought to put it up, and as soon as possible, or your beloved boat may soon be a museum for fish at the bottom of the bay. Tom Schmalenberg, yard manager at Steve's Yacht Repair at Annapolis Harbor Boat Yard, said every winter he comes across a few boats that sink because they were winterized poorly or not at all. "There's always somebody out there where it just slipped their mind," he said.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.