Advertisement
HomeCollectionsRunning Brook
IN THE NEWS

Running Brook

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
October 7, 2007
Every month, Running Brook Elementary School in Columbia holds a book swap for its students. Children are asked to bring books from home that they have read. The books then become part of an exchange program.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By John-John Williams IV and John-John Williams IV,john-john.williams@baltsun.com | August 24, 2008
Troy Todd has spent the summer moving, only to come right back where he started. The 36-year-old principal at Running Brook Elementary is a familiar face to students and staff. He spent the past three years there as a respected, dynamic assistant principal. It was hard for him to leave the school when he was transferred to Waterloo Elementary as an assistant principal at the beginning of the summer. But a series of transfers and promotions within the school system created an opening at his beloved Running Brook, which resulted in his returning to the school just as he had virtually completed the transition to his new assignment.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Vikki Valentine and Vikki Valentine,Contributing Writer | May 3, 1995
For 10 weeks, 14 Running Brook Elementary fourth- and fifth-graders have given up recesses, lunches, chorus and other clubs for quarterly reports and NASDAQ listings.Tomorrow, the students will find out if their hard work paid off big in the StockMarket Game -- a game in which about 4,200 students across the state compete in a simulation to see who can reap the most from an imaginary $100,000 stock market investment.The moneymaking savvy of team No. 60007 -- one of four at the Columbia school -- has put them in the lead of the elementary division since Week 1."
NEWS
By John-John Williams IV and John-John Williams IV,Sun Reporter | July 13, 2008
Hadriel Ferrera directed a blindfolded classmate through a maze of items scattered across the floor of the library at Running Brook Elementary School. "Keep going," said Hadriel, 9, who will be a fifth-grader in the fall. "Go straight. Go left. A little bit more. Stop! Left a little bit." A few feet away in the computer lab, students were reviewing Internet safety tips. Farther down the hall in the teacher's lounge, another group of students was preparing a dessert called Dirt in a Cup. This is not your father's summer school.
NEWS
By LARRY STURGILL | April 26, 1995
*TC The Running Brook Gazette is a new school newspaper published by students at Running Brook Elementary School.The paper is the creation of Running Brook student editors Kianna Clark, Borna Ghavam, Jennifer Goines and Kelly Moses. April marked the inaugural edition of the paper, which is designed to keep students informed about the school and school activities.The first issue contained a stinging editorial on school safety by Borna Ghavam warning students and parents that some of them are not following before- and after-school safety procedures.
NEWS
By Howard Libit and Howard Libit,SUN STAFF | April 30, 1996
Corita M. Oduyoye, the assistant principal at Running Brook Elementary School, was honored Saturday as Assistant Principal of the Year by the Maryland Association of Elementary School Principals."
NEWS
By John-John Williams IV and John-John Williams IV,Sun reporter | July 29, 2007
After four weeks of summer school at Running Brook Elementary, nearby residents were used to the steady flow of students at the newly renovated facility. But the sight of two fully grown cattle outside the school's front entrance Friday was a surprise. The two steers - Michael and Angelo - were at the school as part of a challenge issued by Assistant Principals Troy Todd and Brian Vanisko. Todd, who oversaw the 46 students from Running Brook Elementary, and Vanisko, who oversaw the 71 students from nearby Stevens Forest Elementary, joined forces to encourage their students to keep up their attendance at the Running Brook summer school program.
NEWS
By Erin Texeira and Erin Texeira,SUN STAFF | February 5, 1998
The affluent Howard County school system might be catching a glimpse of the future. For the first time, the majority of students at two of its schools are considered poor.That's not measured by Howard standards, but by the federal government's: More than 50 percent of students at Running Brook and Talbott Springs elementaries -- both in Columbia -- qualify for free or reduced-price lunches.Running Brook provides a clear look at the changing face of some schools in Howard and other suburban areas.
NEWS
By Howard Libit and Howard Libit,SUN STAFF | April 28, 1997
For 10-year-old Elizabeth Thompson, the perfect word to describe her principal, Deborah Drown, is honeysuckle."Honeysuckle smells sweet, and whenever you see Mrs. Drown, if it isn't a serious matter, it's almost guaranteed that she will be smiling," the Running Brook Elementary School fifth-grader wrote."
NEWS
By John-John Williams IV and John-John Williams IV,Sun Reporter | July 13, 2008
Hadriel Ferrera directed a blindfolded classmate through a maze of items scattered across the floor of the library at Running Brook Elementary School. "Keep going," said Hadriel, 9, who will be a fifth-grader in the fall. "Go straight. Go left. A little bit more. Stop! Left a little bit." A few feet away in the computer lab, students were reviewing Internet safety tips. Farther down the hall in the teacher's lounge, another group of students was preparing a dessert called Dirt in a Cup. This is not your father's summer school.
NEWS
By John-John Williams IV and John-John Williams IV,Sun reporter | April 27, 2008
The High School Musical craze that has swept the nation has found its way to Running Brook Elementary School. This month, 50 fourth- and fifth-graders at the school performed the stage production of the Emmy Award-winning television movie. The performances topped off an eight-week drama class at the school. The class was subsidized - students had to pay $25 instead of the usual $185 fee - with money from the Columbia Center for Theatrical Arts, BRIDGES Over Howard County, Target and Howard Bank.
NEWS
By John-John Williams IV and John-John Williams IV,Sun reporter | November 2, 2007
Taj Pittman strolled down the halls of Running Brook Elementary School in Columbia with a smile on his face that was almost as gigantic as the yellow M&M costume he wore. Taj, an 7-year-old second-grader, chose the costume to illustrate the word gigantic for his school's annual vocabulary parade - an event Wednesday that added an educational element to the traditional Halloween celebration. Later in the day, Taj and the 340 other students in the school ate healthy party foods that included pretzels, carrots, apples, juice and just an occasional sweet.
NEWS
October 7, 2007
Every month, Running Brook Elementary School in Columbia holds a book swap for its students. Children are asked to bring books from home that they have read. The books then become part of an exchange program.
NEWS
By John-John Williams IV and John-John Williams IV,Sun reporter | July 29, 2007
After four weeks of summer school at Running Brook Elementary, nearby residents were used to the steady flow of students at the newly renovated facility. But the sight of two fully grown cattle outside the school's front entrance Friday was a surprise. The two steers - Michael and Angelo - were at the school as part of a challenge issued by Assistant Principals Troy Todd and Brian Vanisko. Todd, who oversaw the 46 students from Running Brook Elementary, and Vanisko, who oversaw the 71 students from nearby Stevens Forest Elementary, joined forces to encourage their students to keep up their attendance at the Running Brook summer school program.
NEWS
By JOHN-JOHN WILLIAMS IV | October 29, 2006
Running Brook Elementary decided to put a new twist on the traditional Halloween treat this year. The Columbia school held its first Vocabulary Parade on Friday in the place of typical Halloween celebrations in schools across the nation. Students and teachers were encouraged to dress in costumes inspired by vocabulary words that included fancy, enlightened, intelligent, muscular and tiger. The students showed off their costumes during a parade, and had fruit and vegetables, instead of sugary treats.
NEWS
By JOHN-JOHN WILLIAMS IV | May 21, 2006
Arming 200 elementary school pupils with paint and brushes sounds like a recipe for disaster. But the idea turned into a masterpiece at Running Brook Elementary School. For two weeks in April, fourth- and fifth-graders worked in groups of seven on a mural of the Wilde Lake community for the school cafeteria. The mural will be unveiled officially Thursday at the school's spring concert. The mural runs the length of the cafeteria - 4 feet by 30 feet - and incorporates the tiniest details, down to dozens of people enjoying the surroundings that include Wilde Lake and a bike trail.
NEWS
By Tanika White and Tanika White,SUN STAFF | April 9, 2002
Laura F. Lee had just put on her pajamas and settled on the couch to watch the Oscars when her phone rang. A half-hour later, Lee was at Howard County General Hospital's intake desk, translating for a 15-year-old pregnant girl who could not speak English but whose cries of pain signaled in any language that her baby was going to be born any minute. Doctors soon realized that they would also need the Running Brook Elementary School parent educator's translation talents in the delivery room.
NEWS
By John-John Williams IV and John-John Williams IV,john-john.williams@baltsun.com | August 24, 2008
Troy Todd has spent the summer moving, only to come right back where he started. The 36-year-old principal at Running Brook Elementary is a familiar face to students and staff. He spent the past three years there as a respected, dynamic assistant principal. It was hard for him to leave the school when he was transferred to Waterloo Elementary as an assistant principal at the beginning of the summer. But a series of transfers and promotions within the school system created an opening at his beloved Running Brook, which resulted in his returning to the school just as he had virtually completed the transition to his new assignment.
NEWS
By Laura Shovan and Laura Shovan,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 17, 2004
John Hannay knew that Running Brook Elementary's new bully-proofing program was working when he overheard his son tell a friend, "You have to think about other people's feelings and how they're going to feel when you do that." "He was using language ... he must have gotten at school," Hannay said of his son, Stefan, a third-grader at Running Brook. According to school psychologist Gina Santoro, Running Brook's focus on bully-proofing is not the result of a bullying problem, but it recognizes an issue with which all schools deal.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.