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NEWS
July 16, 2005
KENNETH G. RUNGE of Dover, died at home Thursday, July 14, 2005 after a long illness. He was 79. Mr. Runge was born March 4, 1926 in Baltimore, Maryland to the late John G. Runge and Josephine Klein Runge. He attended Baltimore County Schools. He was three times a soldier, his first stint in the Army came when he was 15 years and 1 month old. He served as a cannoneer for B Battery, 8th Field Artillery he later transferred to B Battery 89th Field Artillery Battalion of the 25th Infantry Division.
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NEWS
Susan Reimer | December 13, 2010
Middle America, the mythical heartland where God, country and family are held in sacred esteem, appears to be turning its back on marriage, according to a new study. The 2010 "State of Our Unions," released last week by the National Marriage Project at the University of Virginia, reports that the 58 percent of adults who have a high school diploma and possibly some further education (short of a four-year degree) are increasingly disenchanted with marriage, are more likely to divorce and are more likely to have children out of wedlock, circumstances that align them with the poorest Americans and the most fragile families.
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NEWS
By CHICAGO TRIBUNE | June 17, 2001
CHICAGO - The Chicago FBI acknowledges a lapse in failing to alert Illinois officials that its investigators found a knife in the home of a suspected serial killer - notification that could have sent him back to prison before he is alleged to have killed four more women. Paul Runge, 31, a truck driver and former shoe salesman, was charged Thursday in the killings of six women and a girl. Four victims, police said, were slain in Chicago in early 1997, more than a year after the search of his home.
NEWS
September 29, 2009
Baltimore bird-watching has rarely been more fun - or more awful. The differences between ravens and orioles have become increasingly apparent: While one species is threatened, the other is threatening, particularly to the health of opposing quarterbacks. With one week left in Major League Baseball's regular season (Baltimore fans may have forgotten, but October brings something called the "playoffs"), the Orioles appear destined for a 100-loss season and perhaps their worst finish in two decades.
NEWS
By Ed Brandt and Ed Brandt,Sun Staff Writer | June 19, 1995
A man in his 40s was standing in the basement of an Essex house, his thin body in constant, involuntary motion because of a nervous system affliction, St. Vitus' dance.He took $26 worth of groceries from Mable Runge, thanked her and started to leave the Eastern Interfaith Outreach food pantry."Here, I'll throw in a Mother's Day cake," she said, reaching into a refrigerator and handing over the cake, temptingly bright with red and yellow icing.Mrs. Runge, at 82, is finding purpose in her life as volunteer director of the Outreach pantry, which is supported by 24 Essex-area churches and several community organizations.
NEWS
September 2, 2005
On August 31, 2005 FRANK J. MATECKI, beloved husband of Estelle A. Matecki (nee Haffner); devoted father of Denise M. Leuschel; loving grandfather of Michelle Runge and her husband Craig, Brandy and Brandon Leuschel; great-grandfather of Hannah Runge, Blake Lacher and Cali Lee Leuschel; dear brother of Frances Zapotocky; also survived by many loving nieces and nephews. Relatives and friends are invited to call at the Schimunek Funeral Home Inc, at 9705 Belair Rd (Perry Hall) on Thursday and Friday 3 to 5 and 7 to 9 P.M. A Funeral Mass will be held at St. Joseph Church (Fullerton)
SPORTS
April 25, 2008
A recap of the Orioles' 3-2 win over the Mariners on Wednesday night: CABRERA IN CONTROL When Daniel Cabrera beat the New York Yankees in his previous outing, holding them to two runs over six innings, the big question was could he do it again. He certainly could. Cabrera produced his third straight strong start, holding the Mariners to two runs in eight innings, the longest outing for an Orioles starter this year. Cabrera got out of a bases-loaded, no-out jam in the fourth inning by allowing just one run, and he retired 15 of the next 16 batters he faced.
NEWS
August 17, 1999
Jane Fowble Pearce, 69, Butler homemakerFuneral services for Jane Fowble Pearce, a homemaker who enjoyed decorating the window boxes of the Butler post office, will be held at 6 p.m. Friday at St. James Episcopal Church, 3100 Monkton Road, Monkton.Mrs. Pearce died Aug. 10 of injuries she suffered in an automobile accident in Swinford, County Mayo, Ireland. She was 69 and lived at The Hill, her home in Butler.She was vacationing with her sister, Anne Delamere Akehurst, 77, of Butler, who also was killed in the accident.
NEWS
By Ricardo A. Zaldivar and Ricardo A. Zaldivar,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 3, 2003
WASHINGTON - The bad habits of gas-guzzling, road-hogging sport utility vehicles are a red-hot topic, but consumers bought 4 million of them last year, and the Bush administration is unlikely to impose safety and environmental changes that could kill the market. America's infatuation with the off-road behemoths that became a suburban creature comfort doesn't seem headed toward a rejection of SUVs - only a desire to tame them by making them less prone to flip over or crush cars in collisions, and somewhat less wasteful of fuel.
NEWS
By John-John Williams IV and John-John Williams IV,sun reporter | February 16, 2007
Alayna Newsome beat her alarm clock by a half-hour and woke up at 6:57 a.m. energized and excited. Even though it would be seven hours until the camera would roll, the St. John's Parish Day School third-grader was pumped. Alayna, of Woodbine, had spent the past week combing Web sites for current events and perfecting her poise as she prepared to read a news script in front of her classmates. This year, third-graders at the private Ellicott City school have gained a greater appreciation for broadcast journalists, current events and public speaking through a required newscast presentation.
SPORTS
April 25, 2008
A recap of the Orioles' 3-2 win over the Mariners on Wednesday night: CABRERA IN CONTROL When Daniel Cabrera beat the New York Yankees in his previous outing, holding them to two runs over six innings, the big question was could he do it again. He certainly could. Cabrera produced his third straight strong start, holding the Mariners to two runs in eight innings, the longest outing for an Orioles starter this year. Cabrera got out of a bases-loaded, no-out jam in the fourth inning by allowing just one run, and he retired 15 of the next 16 batters he faced.
NEWS
By John-John Williams IV and John-John Williams IV,sun reporter | February 16, 2007
Alayna Newsome beat her alarm clock by a half-hour and woke up at 6:57 a.m. energized and excited. Even though it would be seven hours until the camera would roll, the St. John's Parish Day School third-grader was pumped. Alayna, of Woodbine, had spent the past week combing Web sites for current events and perfecting her poise as she prepared to read a news script in front of her classmates. This year, third-graders at the private Ellicott City school have gained a greater appreciation for broadcast journalists, current events and public speaking through a required newscast presentation.
SPORTS
By Dan Connolly and Dan Connolly,Sun Reporter | September 5, 2006
Ryan Adams was among the lucky ones. Lucky compared with what some classmates and teammates dealt with after Hurricane Katrina. Lucky he and his family had a house to return to, even though it had no air conditioning, no electricity for weeks. Lucky he could complete his senior year at his elite high school, even though it took five months before he could re-enroll. Lucky he could play baseball again last spring, even though his season was cut short because of a leg injury that simply wouldn't go away.
NEWS
By JAMIE SMITH HOPKINS and JAMIE SMITH HOPKINS,SUN REPORTER | November 2, 2005
Donald W. Thompson, 30, works at a warehouse for $9.60 an hour, about the best he could hope to earn without a high-school diploma. But he has three young children, and the money isn't enough. "I want to better myself, you know?" said Thompson, who lives in East Baltimore. "For my family, because we can't live how I grew up." One of the city's most intractable dichotomies is the fact that the average Baltimore employer pays wages that are among the highest in the state, yet city residents earn salaries that are among the lowest.
NEWS
September 2, 2005
On August 31, 2005 FRANK J. MATECKI, beloved husband of Estelle A. Matecki (nee Haffner); devoted father of Denise M. Leuschel; loving grandfather of Michelle Runge and her husband Craig, Brandy and Brandon Leuschel; great-grandfather of Hannah Runge, Blake Lacher and Cali Lee Leuschel; dear brother of Frances Zapotocky; also survived by many loving nieces and nephews. Relatives and friends are invited to call at the Schimunek Funeral Home Inc, at 9705 Belair Rd (Perry Hall) on Thursday and Friday 3 to 5 and 7 to 9 P.M. A Funeral Mass will be held at St. Joseph Church (Fullerton)
NEWS
July 16, 2005
KENNETH G. RUNGE of Dover, died at home Thursday, July 14, 2005 after a long illness. He was 79. Mr. Runge was born March 4, 1926 in Baltimore, Maryland to the late John G. Runge and Josephine Klein Runge. He attended Baltimore County Schools. He was three times a soldier, his first stint in the Army came when he was 15 years and 1 month old. He served as a cannoneer for B Battery, 8th Field Artillery he later transferred to B Battery 89th Field Artillery Battalion of the 25th Infantry Division.
NEWS
December 20, 2000
James D. King Jr., 73, insurance firm partner James D. King Jr., a retired partner in an insurance and investment planning firm, died Saturday of lung cancer at his Towson home. He was 73. Mr. King retired in 1988 as board chairman of Veydt-King & Co., a Towson insurance and investment planning firm, which he and Gerlad R. Veydt founded in 1980. He started his career in 1945 at the age of 18 with Mutual Benefit Life in Baltimore, and two years later was the company's leading salesman.
NEWS
By Siobhan Gorman and Siobhan Gorman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | July 13, 2005
WASHINGTON - Barely two years after its creation, the Department of Homeland Security is about to undergo an extensive reorganization that will affect everything from the Federal Emergency Management Agency to the government's much-mocked, color-coded terrorism alert system. The shake-up is expected to be announced in a speech today by Secretary Michael Chertoff, who ordered a management review shortly after taking over the 183,000-employee department in February. The reorganization calls for a redesign of the top rung of the department's leadership and will make significant changes affecting the department's intelligence wing, border security division and FEMA, according to current and former department officials.
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