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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | September 26, 2003
Can a movie starring an inanimate object really move? It can if that object is a rock - or, to be more precise, The Rock, a professional wrestler whose surprisingly adroit acting muscles are on full display in The Rundown, an action-adventure flick that could turn into this generation's Raiders of the Lost Ark. Like Raiders, this movie flatly refuses to take itself seriously. It also exists as a series of chases and pitched battles strung together under the guise of a quest for some precious object (in this case, an idol revered by a town of South American slave laborers)
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FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | June 14, 2013
A new urban park is bringing a patch of green to a once-blighted corner of Broadway East, a project organizers hope can be a model for improving the quality of life and reducing pollution in other distressed Baltimore neighborhoods. Trees are to be planted today at the corner of Gay and Federal streets, on a third of an acre where until a few years ago 18 mostly dilapidated rowhouses had stood. Community and nonprofit leaders, elected officials and others who live, worship and work in the area are expected to be on hand to help with landscaping the New Broadway East Community Park.
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NEWS
By Scott Calvert and Scott Calvert,SUN STAFF | November 16, 2000
Rundown Parole Plaza would be transformed into a shimmering minicity outside Annapolis with multiple towers, parking garages and small parks, according to a computer-animated rendering shown to reporters and Anne Arundel County officials yesterday. A 20-story hotel and residential tower would be here, a 16-story office building there, as well as five parking garages and roads knitting the 33-acre site into an urban grid dotted with green. At the center would stand, hidden by its taller neighbors, a sprawling Wal-Mart store, forming the core of what has been renamed Parole Centre.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | September 27, 2012
Anne Arundel County may get a new police academy to replace a facility that was built by the military as a Nike missile site more than a half-century ago. The existing facility includes the dilapidated original military office building - which has been renovated and expanded over the years - as well as an underground missile silo that has been turned into an exercise center where the mats have to be rolled up before a storm so the many leaks don't...
ENTERTAINMENT
October 2, 2003
"I took the role so I could throw some punches at Seann William Scott. -- The Rock, who actually loves his co-star in the new film The Rundown.
NEWS
March 5, 2009
Despite owning more than 9,000 abandoned properties in Baltimore, the city sells about 250 a year to community developers and individuals. At that rate, Baltimore will never rid itself of this behemoth of blight. That lopsided ratio argues strongly for a better system of selling these rundown houses and vacant lots so that they can be returned to the tax rolls. Mayor Sheila Dixon has proposed creation of a land bank that would take control of the city's vast inventory of abandoned houses and streamline a process known to be cumbersome and time-consuming.
SPORTS
By Jim Henneman and Jim Henneman,Staff Writer | April 16, 1992
BOSTON -- On a day when Cal Ripken made two errors in the same game for only the second time in five years, maybe it was too much to expect the Orioles to salvage a win.But, as has been the case in all but one of their five losses to date, yesterday's game against the Boston Red Sox was very winnable. Ultimately it came down to a two-out, two-run eighth-inning single by pesty Jody Reed that broke a 4-4 tie and enabled the Red Sox to hold on for a 6-5 win.The Orioles actually ran themselves out of this one, but it was on defense rather than the basepaths that the foul-up occurred.
NEWS
By Bernie Walter | September 18, 1990
Editor's note: Arundel High baseball coach Bernie Walter recently returned from Cuba, where he coached the U.S. Junior National baseball team at the World Championships. The American team, which consisted of 18 of the best 17-and 18-year-old players from throughout the country, finished third behind Cuba and Taipei with a 6-2 record. The following is the first of three parts of the journal he kept about his experiences in Cuba.Day 1, Aug. 23 11:27 p.m.: Left the Florida Keys.12:05 a.m.: 38-minute flight.
SPORTS
By Jim Henneman and Jim Henneman,Evening Sun Staff | April 19, 1991
MILWAUKEE -- If there were no excuses, at least there was a small degree of consolation for Glenn Davis.Not enough to ease the sting of the Orioles' 4-3 loss to the Brewers in 11 innings yesterday, but at least a little salve for the wound."
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 9, 2006
BEDFORD, N.Y. --This town in Westchester County, famous for its famous - and well-heeled - residents, is sprucing up a rundown ranch house and planning to sell it at a bargain-basement rate to a member of an increasingly endangered species: a volunteer firefighter. Hastings-on-Hudson allows volunteer firefighters to live outside its boundaries and is giving them and volunteer paramedics first claim on 18 moderately priced apartments built on village property. For two decades, as New York City's suburban housing has become more expensive, the number of people who can afford to live in the wealthiest communities and also volunteer or hold public jobs there has dwindled.
EXPLORE
January 26, 2012
Editor: The Aegis' recent editorial, "A lot of money" errs in stating that "county school boards — with no input from the state — negotiate pension and salary packages with the teachers unions. " The fact is pension benefits are established in statute by the Maryland General Assembly. They are not negotiable at the county level and are not subject to change unless action is taken by the Legislature. To be clear, teacher salaries are negotiated, established and paid for by the counties, while the pension benefits—based on a statutory formula determined in part by those salaries—are paid by the state.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jordan Bartel, b | January 8, 2012
Our rundown of what's going on in for the week of 1/9-1/15 MOVIES OPENING (Friday) Beauty and the Beast 3-D Carnage Contraband The Iron Lady Joyful Noise NOTABLE TV MONDAY First Week In (series debut; 9 p.m.; Discovery) America's Money Class With Suze Orman (series debut; 9 p.m.; OWN) Mobster Confessions (series debut; 10 p.m.; Discovery) Caged (series debut; 10 p.m.; MTV) Castle (returns; 10 p.m.; ABC) TUESDAY Shipping Wars (series debut; 9 p.m.; A&E)
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | September 4, 2011
Twenty-two-year-old Elkridge resident Roger Buckley recalls U.S. 1 as cluttered with "lots of old, sleazy motels, liquor stores and fast-food restaurants. " The main drag near his childhood home was run-down, but it had its advantages. Buckley remembers fondly a vacant home with an empty swimming pool that he and his friends used as a skate park; it was just off the busy corridor, near his job at Neu-Valley Nurseries. The home has since been torn down and now the buzz of power tools can be heard as construction workers install windows in the new four-story townhomes at Elkridge Crossing.
NEWS
By Julie Scharper and Julie Scharper,Sun reporter | February 2, 2008
The Copy Cat building might be the only place in the city where a professional dancing banana could feel at home. In one apartment, a tire swing dangles between a drum set and a bar. In another, food salvaged from garbage bins fills the refrigerator and a bottle of turquoise hair dye sits in the bathroom. Everywhere you look in the former factory in the Station North Arts and Entertainment District there are interesting things -- an old wheelchair, a maze of hand-built walls, an orange cat named Fettuccine -- and countless works of art. "I consider it my own personal playground," says Carabella Sands, 21, the dancing banana in question, who retreats there after a long day luring customers to a Timonium smoothie stand.
SPORTS
By JOHN EISENBERG | October 11, 1997
The issue is no longer whether the Ravens made a mistake when they signed Bam Morris.The issue is whether they have learned from their ridiculous mistake of giving Morris a $1.8 million contract six months after he was arrested and charged with having almost 6 pounds of marijuana in the trunk of his car.The issue is whether they're going to keep getting involved with players who already have a track record of making headlines for all the wrong reasons.Such...
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