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NEWS
March 28, 2001
A second Westminster Common Council member has filed to run for mayor. Councilman Kevin E. Dayhoff filed his intent to run yesterday, joining Councilwoman Suzanne P. Albert, who filed last month. Dayhoff, 47, has served on the council since 1999 and has served on city, county and state boards for 20 years. In June, he was elected to the board of directors of Maryland Municipal League. A landscaper, artist and writer, Dayhoff is a senior at Western Maryland College majoring in public policy administration and analysis.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | August 13, 2013
Four men and one woman are vying for perhaps the trickiest job in Annapolis: mayor. The state's capital has been buzzing in recent months over proposals to adopt a new plan to guide future development at City Dock and to rezone key waterfront properties downtown. Meanwhile, residents have raised concerns about a major development proposed for the edge of town, and the city is still recovering from the economic downturn. “Much of these last four years, I've been trying to fix a lot of things that weren't right,” said Mayor Josh Cohen, a Democrat who is seeking re-election.
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NEWS
By Fred Rasmussen and Fred Rasmussen,Contributing Writer | April 8, 1993
Westminster City Council President William F. Haifley said yesterday that he will not run for mayor or any other office in the May 10 election.Mr. Haifley's announcement at City Hall included an ardent attack on Mayor W. Benjamin Brown, who said minutes later that he had filed to run for a second four-year term.Mr. Haifley, an eight-year councilman who had been widely rumored as a possible mayoral candidate, said in prepared remarks, "It would be an improvement in city government if Mayor Brown were out of office."
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | June 21, 2013
Annapolis Mayor Josh Cohen has his first challengers for this fall's election. Two Republicans have announced they're running for mayor: Bob O'Shea and Mike Pantelides. "I am not letting Josh cakewalk into the mayor's position," said O'Shea, a business consultant who has lived in Annapolis for 13 years, first in the downtown historic district and more recently in Murray Hill. O'Shea, who had also considered running for alderman before settling on the mayoral race, said he wants to give voters a different choice than Cohen, the incumbent Democrat.
NEWS
By Ivan Penn and Ivan Penn,SUN STAFF | January 29, 1999
Despite a possible candidacy by his prominent cousin, Baltimore City Council President Lawrence A. Bell III is piecing together a political machine as he prepares to declare he will run for mayor.Bell, considered one of the favorites in this year's mayoral race, has lined up several members of his campaign team, even though a cloud appears over the campaign while the city awaits a decision about the possible candidacy of NAACP President Kweisi Mfume, whom state leaders in the General Assembly are pushing to run."
NEWS
By John Fritze and John Fritze,Sun reporter | April 26, 2007
With pundits increasingly convinced he's not in the race, Kweisi Mfume is still hedging his bets publicly about whether he will run for mayor of Baltimore in this year's election - adding to lingering speculation about his intentions as the deadline for his decision approaches. After attending a City Hall event yesterday with Mayor Sheila Dixon and another potential mayoral candidate, Comptroller Joan M. Pratt - a symbolic gesture for all three leaders - Mfume said he is not planning to run "at this point" but would not rule out changing his mind this summer.
NEWS
By Gerard Shields and Gerard Shields,SUN STAFF | July 1, 1999
Baltimore State's Attorney Patricia C. Jessamy said yesterday that she will not run for mayor.Jessamy ended two months of speculation over whether she would join the seven-candidate Democratic field trying to succeed departing Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke in December.The 50-year-old prosecutor, who won re-election to a four-year term last year unopposed, said fighting crime is more important than seeking higher office."The state's attorney's office is underfunded and understaffed," Jessamy said in announcing her decision.
NEWS
By Michael Olesker | March 14, 1999
AFTER A WEEK IN which I talked to everybody who knows something about the political future of Kweisi Mfume and the race for mayor of Baltimore, I can report the following to everyone with the greatest sense of confidence and authority: Nobody knows anything.William Donald Schaefer thought he knew something, but now he thinks he doesn't. Howard P. "Pete" Rawlings has his little corner of hope, and Lawrence Bell has an entire inventory of anxieties, none of which is the same thing as certainty.
NEWS
By Caitlin Francke and Caitlin Francke,SUN STAFF | October 31, 2001
About 250 people came to a $100-a-head fund-raiser for City Council President Sheila Dixon last night aboard an Inner Harbor cruise ship. Dixon campaign officials did not know exactly how much the event on the Bay Lady raised, but said that more than 500 tickets were sold before the party, and several people paid at the door. The crowd, which nibbled on quiche and roast beef, included contractors, developers and business leaders as well as council members and state legislators. Dixon said yesterday that her fund-raiser - which occurred nearly two years into her five-year term - is not an indication that she is seeking higher office.
NEWS
By Ivan Penn and Ivan Penn,SUN STAFF | May 29, 1999
State Sen. Joan Carter Conway has formed an exploratory committee and will conduct a poll this weekend to test her name recognition for a possible mayoral run in this year's election, a consultant for the senator said yesterday.Conway is one of 10 potential candidates, some undeclared, with no incumbent running and no clear front-runner."A lot of people feel there are a lot of mediocre candidates," said former Del. Kenneth L. Webster, a consultant on Conway's political team. "We believe if we're in it, we'll win it."
NEWS
By Nicole Fuller, The Baltimore Sun | September 10, 2011
Mere seconds after setting foot on the bustling sidewalk outside Lexington Market, Frank M. Conaway Sr. is surrounded first by a small group of admirers, quickly followed by hordes of hangers-on howling his name. Like many Baltimoreans who have fallen on hard times, they want something from their politicians. And this crowd doesn't shy away from asking. On a rainy day last week, dozens of people — some of whom said they were living in government-subsidized apartments or were homeless — pleaded with Conaway for jobs.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Laura Vozzella | June 29, 2011
You'd think recent indictments in the Bob Ehrlich robocall case would have scared off political dirty tricksters. That doesn't appear to be the case. Near as I can tell, Sun op-ed columnist Marta Mossburg is not running for mayor. Nor is she changing the spelling of her last name from Mossburg to Mossberg.  So what explains the "Marta Mossberg for Mayor" sticker that Sun police reporter extraordinaire Justin Fenton stumbled upon? There's no authority line on the sticker, surprise, surprise.  Mossburg, former editorial page editor of the Baltimore Examiner, is a senior fellow at the Maryland Public Policy Institute and a fellow with the Franklin Center for Government & Public Integrity.  "I have no idea who would print the ' campaign' sticker," Mossburg told me in an email just now. "It made me laugh, and I went over to see it for myself  Tuesday to check to see if it was real.
NEWS
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | June 2, 2011
State Sen. Catherine E. Pugh is planning to join a crowded field of Baltimore mayoral candidates. Pugh, a West Baltimore Democrat, said Thursday that she will officially announce her candidacy Monday afternoon at a West North Avenue community center. "It is now time to begin a broader conversation about Baltimore's young people, neighborhoods and opportunities to push our city forward," Pugh said in a statement. Pugh will challenge Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake in the Democratic primary in September.
NEWS
By Yeganeh June Torbati, The Baltimore Sun | December 30, 2010
Scott Donahoo, a former car salesman known for his boisterous television commercials, told a local radio station that he is giving "serious consideration" to a run for mayor next year, joining an already crowded field of potential candidates. Scott Donahoo told Jimmy Mathis of WBAL radio that as mayor, he would drastically cut property taxes and increase the city's police presence. "We have lost a tremendous amount of the police department due to the failed policies of previous administrations and current administration," Donahoo said during the interview.
NEWS
By Tyeesha Dixon and Tyeesha Dixon,tyeesha.dixon@baltsun.com | March 15, 2009
Samuel E. Shropshire was visiting a museum in Gambia, one of Annapolis' sister cities, when he saw a picture of child slaves being auctioned at Annapolis City Dock. "When I saw that, I realized that the city condoned nearly 100 years of slavery," Shropshire said, recalling the experience that prompted him to urge fellow aldermen on the Annapolis City Council to issue an apology for participating in slavery. Shropshire's life journey has taken him from the deep South to a Soviet jail to founding a nonprofit to help people living with HIV and AIDS.
NEWS
By Nicole Fuller and Nicole Fuller,Sun reporter | January 13, 2008
Annapolis Alderman Richard E. Israel is set to introduce to the city council tomorrow night legislation that would severely limit the power of the mayor to oversee city government and municipal services. The authority to hire, fire and set salaries for department heads would shift from the mayor to the city administrator, who currently oversees the day-to-day management of the departments in conjunction with the mayor. The change would restrict the mayor's role to policymaking while expanding the role of the city administrator, who is hired by the mayor.
NEWS
By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,SUN STAFF | December 13, 2002
Baltimore Circuit Court Clerk Frank M. Conaway said yesterday that he will challenge Mayor Martin O'Malley in the next Democratic primary, making Conaway the first opponent of the mayor's to announce his candidacy. Conaway, 69, a former state delegate who finished third in the 1999 Democratic primary for City Council president, said he is running because O'Malley has not made the city safe enough and because he does not hire enough local African-Americans. "`Believe?' Believe in what?
NEWS
By John Fritze and Eric Siegel and John Fritze and Eric Siegel,Sun reporters | January 13, 2007
Three-term Baltimore City Councilman Keiffer J. Mitchell Jr. was ousted yesterday as chairman of the City Council's powerful Taxation and Finance Committee just days after he announced he will run for mayor. Mitchell, who led the five-member committee for seven years, said he discovered that he would be replaced during a meeting with City Councilwoman Stephanie C. Rawlings Blake, who is expected to become the president of the City Council this month after Sheila Dixon becomes mayor next week.
NEWS
By Madison Park and Madison Park,SUN REPORTER | October 10, 2007
Nicole V. Burlew is a candidate for mayor in Aberdeen who never voted in a city election - she wasn't old enough. But the soft-spoken 19-year-old college student has taken up the call to public service, mounting a campaign to lead the Harford County city of 15,000 that faces budget troubles and looming growth because of the national military base realignment.
NEWS
By Julie Turkewitz and Julie Turkewitz,Sun reporter | June 22, 2007
Frank M. Conaway Sr., one of the oldest hands in Baltimore politics, announced officially yesterday that he will run for mayor, harshly criticizing the policies of Mayor Sheila Dixon and outlining his plan to remedy what he called Baltimore's crime-rate "crisis." At his announcement at War Memorial Plaza, the three-term clerk of Baltimore's Circuit Court argued that Dixon has lost control of the city, which he described as a lawless war zone. Bowing out Comptroller Joan M. Pratt decides not to run for mayor.
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