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By Candy Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | April 18, 2013
The state on Friday will begin a weeklong project to install new safety measures on the westbound span of the Bay Bridge to guide traffic during two-way operation and eliminate some lane changes. Crews will install a buffer zone, rumble strips and continuous double yellow lines along the entire 4.3-mile length of the span, as recommended in a safety study last year. The result will mean motorists will not be allowed to switch between the left and center lanes at any time during a crossing.
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NEWS
By Candy Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | April 18, 2013
The state on Friday will begin a weeklong project to install new safety measures on the westbound span of the Bay Bridge to guide traffic during two-way operation and eliminate some lane changes. Crews will install a buffer zone, rumble strips and continuous double yellow lines along the entire 4.3-mile length of the span, as recommended in a safety study last year. The result will mean motorists will not be allowed to switch between the left and center lanes at any time during a crossing.
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NEWS
January 30, 1995
BZZZZZZZZT. BZZZZZZZZZZZT. BZZZZZZZZZZZZT.What's that? Did you hear that? What an irritating noise!WHAT IN BLAZES WAS THAT!BZZZZZZZZT. BZZZZZZZZZZZT. BZZZZZZZZZZZZT.Friends, that noise, that teeth-rattling, stomach-turning, eye-popping noise could be the sound of your life being saved.In lay terms, it is politely saying to you: "WAKE UP, BUSTER! YOUR CAR IS SPEEDING ACROSS THE CENTER LINE INTO ONCOMING TRAFFIC, AND IF YOU DON'T DO SOMETHING RIGHT AWAY, THAT OVERBITE YOU'VE ALWAYS BEEN SELF-CONSCIOUS ABOUT WILL PRETTY MUCH BE THE LEAST OF YOUR PROBLEMS."
NEWS
By Candy Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | November 29, 2012
Continuous rumble strips and a vividly painted buffer will be added to the Bay Bridge to protect motorists when the westbound span is running with two-way traffic. The Maryland Transportation Authority board voted unanimously to accept the recommendations of a safety committee that evaluated the conditions surrounding five fatal crashes over the last 12 years and looked at modifications — from permanent barriers to temporary markers — to protect the public. The rumble strip installation and paint job, expected to cost less than $500,000, will be carried out next spring in time for summer traffic, officials said.
NEWS
By Rona Kobell and Rona Kobell,SUN STAFF | December 19, 2000
Several weeks after a Glen Burnie High School student was struck and seriously injured crossing Ritchie Highway, engineers with the State Highway Administration have marked the busy intersection near the school with rumble strips, bright school crossing signs and a repainted crosswalk. Steven Pogar, 16, is recovering from injuries he suffered in the Nov. 1 crash, when a car driven by 17-year-old James E. Freeman struck him as he was walking across the southbound lane of Ritchie Highway at Fifth Avenue.
NEWS
By Del Quentin Wilber and Del Quentin Wilber,SUN STAFF | September 13, 1998
In the wake of two fatal car crashes at a Simpsonville intersection, Howard County officials say they will install rumble strips to alert drivers to a stop sign.In the accidents, police said, cars traveling east on Guilford Road ran an oversized stop sign and struck cars traveling on Pindell School Road -- killing a Fulton man Thursday and a 64-year-old New Jersey woman Aug. 24.Officials said the rumble strips are one of the best traffic-calming devices to "wake up" drivers before an intersection.
NEWS
By Candy Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | November 29, 2012
Continuous rumble strips and a vividly painted buffer will be added to the Bay Bridge to protect motorists when the westbound span is running with two-way traffic. The Maryland Transportation Authority board voted unanimously to accept the recommendations of a safety committee that evaluated the conditions surrounding five fatal crashes over the last 12 years and looked at modifications — from permanent barriers to temporary markers — to protect the public. The rumble strip installation and paint job, expected to cost less than $500,000, will be carried out next spring in time for summer traffic, officials said.
NEWS
By Jody K. Vilschick and Jody K. Vilschick,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 15, 2003
ROAD MARKINGS are always problematic. Finding the best way to keep them visible, even in rainy weather and at night, has stymied traffic engineers everywhere. Cecily Wood proposes, in a detailed e-mail, what she called a "win-win" solution for the problem of drivers' inability to see center and lane lines, even with freshly applied or painted lines, in wet weather. "As soon as the lines fade (six months or less), even in good weather you have a hard time seeing them," she said. "And this is probably one of the most complained-about highway safety factors."
NEWS
January 18, 1999
WITH LAST WEEK'S opening of the General Assembly, Annapolis transportation officials have gone to their bag of tricks to try to prevent the event from turning the historic city into one big parking lot with traffic clogging Rowe Boulevard, parking garages full and residential neighborhoods choked with illegally parked cars.It's an annual battle in the state's capital -- and at times, it's not pretty.City traffic officials spent Friday lecturing rookie legislators on parking and shuttle etiquette, while the old-timers were warned against trying to beat the system.
NEWS
June 23, 2009
If fly-by-night dragsters had the power to invent a venue for their illegal races, they'd be hard-pressed to conjure a better racetrack than I-70 near the Baltimore City-Baltimore County line. Wide, straight, designed for expressway speeds yet little traveled late at night, it's a vestige of a never-completed crosstown highway. The deaths of two young people early Sunday morning, allegedly spectators at what Maryland State Police investigators believe was a drag racing event, suggest this isolated strip - a 1 1/2 -mile dead-end spur between a park-and-ride lot and the Beltway - is more than a curiosity.
NEWS
June 23, 2009
If fly-by-night dragsters had the power to invent a venue for their illegal races, they'd be hard-pressed to conjure a better racetrack than I-70 near the Baltimore City-Baltimore County line. Wide, straight, designed for expressway speeds yet little traveled late at night, it's a vestige of a never-completed crosstown highway. The deaths of two young people early Sunday morning, allegedly spectators at what Maryland State Police investigators believe was a drag racing event, suggest this isolated strip - a 1 1/2 -mile dead-end spur between a park-and-ride lot and the Beltway - is more than a curiosity.
NEWS
By Alia Malik and Alia Malik,Sun reporter | July 31, 2007
Mayor Sheila Dixon will release a proposal today to make it easier for Baltimore communities to install traffic-calming devices such as speed bumps and rumble strips. The plan, developed by a city task force, also calls for Baltimore officials to consider the controversial concept of neighborhood cameras capable of taking photos of speeding cars, with violations and fines sent to motorists through the mail. "Everywhere we go, in our communities and neighborhoods, there's issues with traffic, speeding and racing," Dixon said yesterday.
NEWS
By Jody K. Vilschick and Jody K. Vilschick,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 15, 2003
ROAD MARKINGS are always problematic. Finding the best way to keep them visible, even in rainy weather and at night, has stymied traffic engineers everywhere. Cecily Wood proposes, in a detailed e-mail, what she called a "win-win" solution for the problem of drivers' inability to see center and lane lines, even with freshly applied or painted lines, in wet weather. "As soon as the lines fade (six months or less), even in good weather you have a hard time seeing them," she said. "And this is probably one of the most complained-about highway safety factors."
NEWS
By Rona Kobell and Rona Kobell,SUN STAFF | December 19, 2000
Several weeks after a Glen Burnie High School student was struck and seriously injured crossing Ritchie Highway, engineers with the State Highway Administration have marked the busy intersection near the school with rumble strips, bright school crossing signs and a repainted crosswalk. Steven Pogar, 16, is recovering from injuries he suffered in the Nov. 1 crash, when a car driven by 17-year-old James E. Freeman struck him as he was walking across the southbound lane of Ritchie Highway at Fifth Avenue.
NEWS
January 18, 1999
WITH LAST WEEK'S opening of the General Assembly, Annapolis transportation officials have gone to their bag of tricks to try to prevent the event from turning the historic city into one big parking lot with traffic clogging Rowe Boulevard, parking garages full and residential neighborhoods choked with illegally parked cars.It's an annual battle in the state's capital -- and at times, it's not pretty.City traffic officials spent Friday lecturing rookie legislators on parking and shuttle etiquette, while the old-timers were warned against trying to beat the system.
NEWS
October 12, 1998
WHAT AN eye-opener to see a confused deer trying to navigate the Towson roundabout during lunch hour last week.The wayward animal, an eight-point, 180-pound buck, darted around Towson for an hour, drawing crowds and police as it ran into buildings, hunkered down in parking garages and crashed through a window at the old courthouse.With this year's deer population expected to be 300,000 -- the largest in the state since Colonial times -- Maryland Department of Natural Resources and State Highway Administration officials and even commuters are bracing for a precarious autumn.
NEWS
October 12, 1998
WHAT AN eye-opener to see a confused deer trying to navigate the Towson roundabout during lunch hour last week.The wayward animal, an eight-point, 180-pound buck, darted around Towson for an hour, drawing crowds and police as it ran into buildings, hunkered down in parking garages and crashed through a window at the old courthouse.With this year's deer population expected to be 300,000 -- the largest in the state since Colonial times -- Maryland Department of Natural Resources and State Highway Administration officials and even commuters are bracing for a precarious autumn.
NEWS
By Alia Malik and Alia Malik,Sun reporter | July 31, 2007
Mayor Sheila Dixon will release a proposal today to make it easier for Baltimore communities to install traffic-calming devices such as speed bumps and rumble strips. The plan, developed by a city task force, also calls for Baltimore officials to consider the controversial concept of neighborhood cameras capable of taking photos of speeding cars, with violations and fines sent to motorists through the mail. "Everywhere we go, in our communities and neighborhoods, there's issues with traffic, speeding and racing," Dixon said yesterday.
NEWS
By Del Quentin Wilber and Del Quentin Wilber,SUN STAFF | September 13, 1998
In the wake of two fatal car crashes at a Simpsonville intersection, Howard County officials say they will install rumble strips to alert drivers to a stop sign.In the accidents, police said, cars traveling east on Guilford Road ran an oversized stop sign and struck cars traveling on Pindell School Road -- killing a Fulton man Thursday and a 64-year-old New Jersey woman Aug. 24.Officials said the rumble strips are one of the best traffic-calming devices to "wake up" drivers before an intersection.
NEWS
January 30, 1995
BZZZZZZZZT. BZZZZZZZZZZZT. BZZZZZZZZZZZZT.What's that? Did you hear that? What an irritating noise!WHAT IN BLAZES WAS THAT!BZZZZZZZZT. BZZZZZZZZZZZT. BZZZZZZZZZZZZT.Friends, that noise, that teeth-rattling, stomach-turning, eye-popping noise could be the sound of your life being saved.In lay terms, it is politely saying to you: "WAKE UP, BUSTER! YOUR CAR IS SPEEDING ACROSS THE CENTER LINE INTO ONCOMING TRAFFIC, AND IF YOU DON'T DO SOMETHING RIGHT AWAY, THAT OVERBITE YOU'VE ALWAYS BEEN SELF-CONSCIOUS ABOUT WILL PRETTY MUCH BE THE LEAST OF YOUR PROBLEMS."
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