Advertisement
HomeCollectionsRuling Party
IN THE NEWS

Ruling Party

FIND MORE STORIES ABOUT:
FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | February 12, 1995
GUADALAJARA, Mexico -- As a closing campaign act for elections today that will test Mexico's President Ernesto Zedillo and his ruling party as never before, Eugenio Ruiz Orozco's final rally in the capital of the state of Jalisco had it all.In the state where mariachi music was born, the would-be ruling-party governor had hired the nation's top two bands. Buses packed Guadalajara's Plaza Juarez with thousands of rural peasants. Trucks brought banners, chairs and a sound system to cover an acre.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Barbara Demick and Barbara Demick,LOS ANGELES TIMES | May 27, 2008
BEIJING - A top Taiwanese politician arrived in China yesterday for a six-day visit amid hope for warmer relations between the longtime foes. The head of the island's ruling party will meet with Chinese President Hu Jintao during a groundbreaking visit that follows the May 20 inauguration of a new Taiwanese president, Ma Ying-jeou, who is eager to fulfill a campaign pledge of improving ties. For China, the visit provides an opportunity ahead of the Olympic Games in August to project itself as a superpower committed to world peace.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
By New York Times | August 12, 1991
TOKYO -- After a week of floating proposals for new rules to clean up Japan's scandal-ridden stock market, several leading figures in the ruling party have suggested for the first time that the best solution may be to permit more competition in the protected financial markets.The head of a top policy-making council in the Liberal Democratic Party, Mutsuki Kato, and three party groups formed to evaluate financial reforms have separately called for the removal of fixed commission rates on large stock transactions, according to reports in newspapers and on television here.
NEWS
By Robyn Dixon and Robyn Dixon,LOS ANGELES TIMES | May 8, 2008
Johannesburg, South Africa -- Nyasha Putana could not help crying in pain as ruling party supporters used sticks to whack his buttocks and soles of his feet in front of hundreds of fellow villagers. At least five people died from beatings at Monday's "political meeting" at Dakudzwa village, about 60 miles north of Harare, in Mashonaland, according to witnesses, the opposition Movement for Democratic Change and a human rights worker who requested anonymity for fear of reprisals. "They were saying, `We are saving the country by pain,'" said Putana, 32, speaking softly from his hospital bed in Harare yesterday.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | July 28, 1993
TOKYO -- Two centrist opposition leaders who hold the votes to determine who will run Japan's next government informed the country's perennial leaders, the Liberal Democrats, today that they will side with five opposition parties to form an opposition-led coalition.Barring any unpredictable 11th-hour snags, the development appeared to ensure the end of the Liberal Democrats' 38-year rule.Not since 1948 has Japan had a coalition government, and not since 1955, when it was formed, has any party except the Liberal Democrats ruled the country.
NEWS
By NEWSDAY | May 17, 1999
MEXICO CITY -- Mexico's ruling party, which has had exclusive hold on the nation's presidency for 70 years, faces a big ideological test when its national directorate sits down today to decide exactly how it will choose a candidate in what it has promised will be a new democratic era for the Mexican electorate.The Institutional Revolutionary Party, PRI, is expected to end its closed-door system and opt for a form of primary, the first in Mexican history, to choose among four openly declared candidates and two who are flirting with the idea.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 13, 2000
SEOUL, South Korea -- For weeks this country saw nothing but topsy-turvy maneuvering in preparation for today's mid-term parliamentary elections, which, for all of the pirouettes, seemed destined to leave Kim Dae-jung a lame duck for the remaining three years of his presidency. The governing party lost its main coalition partner in a bitter defection; a few days later, the leading opposition party splintered. Meanwhile, civic groups, taking advantage of the country's high Internet usage, began a cyberspace campaign against politicians, mostly in the opposition, who they said were unfit for office because of past corruption.
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | April 24, 2001
TOKYO - Maverick politician Junichiro Koizumi was headed for an upset victory today in the battle to head Japan's government, after his calls to radically reform the country's wobbly economy won him overwhelming support yesterday from the ruling party's rank and file. The final results of an unusual nationwide primary last night showed that the former health minister collected 123 of the 141 votes cast by local supporters of the incumbent Liberal Democratic Party. Those votes, combined with those of parliamentary supporters, leave Koizumi fewer than 30 votes shy of the 244 votes needed to succeed Prime Minister Yoshiro Mori when formal balloting takes place this afternoon, analysts said.
NEWS
By Sam Quinones and Sam Quinones,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 6, 1999
MEXICO CITY -- One image best symbolizes tomorrow's historic presidential primary by Mexico's ruling party.It is the private parts of Roberto Madrazo.Madrazo, the former governor of the state of Tabasco, is seeking the nomination of the ruling Institutional Revolutionary Party (PRI). During his campaign, he ran a television spot about crime. He told Mexico: "You solve the problem with you know what."He was referring to "huevos" -- eggs, slang for testicles. "To have huevos" is a common Mexican expression denoting a person's unflinching nerve.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | April 24, 2008
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa -- Zimbabwe's government quickly distanced itself from an editorial in the state-run newspaper yesterday that called for a transitional unity government headed by the country's longtime strongman, Robert G. Mugabe, until new elections could be organized. Zimbabwe has been plunged into political crisis since its disputed elections last month, with the government refusing to announce who won the race for president. Still, the ruling party has repeatedly argued that neither Mugabe nor his chief rival, Morgan Tsvangirai, won a majority of the votes, forcing the two into a runoff.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | April 24, 2008
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa -- Zimbabwe's government quickly distanced itself from an editorial in the state-run newspaper yesterday that called for a transitional unity government headed by the country's longtime strongman, Robert G. Mugabe, until new elections could be organized. Zimbabwe has been plunged into political crisis since its disputed elections last month, with the government refusing to announce who won the race for president. Still, the ruling party has repeatedly argued that neither Mugabe nor his chief rival, Morgan Tsvangirai, won a majority of the votes, forcing the two into a runoff.
NEWS
By Gadi Dechter and Gadi Dechter,Sun reporter | January 26, 2008
The University of Maryland, College Park has declared a moratorium on late-night parties at the campus student union amid mounting concern about what police describe as brawls at student events that can draw upward of a thousand people, officials said yesterday. Student leaders at the state's flagship public campus said yesterday that they were upset about not being consulted on the decision - which comes the week before they return from winter break. They said the ban could have a disproportionate impact on minority students, who tend to rely on the facility for social events.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | July 30, 2007
TOKYO -- Japan's governing Liberal Democratic Party suffered a crushing defeat in elections yesterday for the upper house of parliament, but Prime Minister Shinzo Abe vowed that he would not step down. The main opposition Democratic Party seized control of the upper house by a landslide, capturing seats not only in cities but in rural districts that have long been strongholds of the Liberal Democratic Party. The rout was widespread, with household names in the governing party falling one after another before opposition newcomers.
NEWS
By Laura King and Laura King,Los Angeles TImes | July 23, 2007
ISTANBUL, Turkey -- Turkish voters handed the Islamist- influenced ruling party a decisive victory in parliamentary elections yesterday, rewarding it for stewardship of the country's robust economy but raising the specter of bitter new quarrels over the feared erosion of Turkey's secular traditions. With more than two-thirds of the votes counted, the Justice and Development Party, known by its Turkish initials AKP, garnered about 48 percent of the vote, according to unofficial results - a substantial increase over the 34 percent it received in elections five years ago when it came to power.
NEWS
By Laura King and Laura King,LOS ANGELES TIMES | May 11, 2007
ISTANBUL, Turkey -- Parliament approved yesterday a constitutional amendment to elect Turkey's president by a popular vote, giving even greater weight to midsummer elections that are shaping up as a divisive referendum on the role of Islam in government. The 376-1 vote by lawmakers opens the door to holding presidential and parliamentary elections simultaneously, on July 22. However, the package of electoral reforms could still be blocked by a veto from the country's resolutely secular president, with whom the ruling party is at odds.
NEWS
By Laura King | May 2, 2007
ISTANBUL, Turkey -- The political crisis in Turkey deepened yesterday when the high court annulled parliament's initial round of voting for president, hampering the ruling party's efforts to install a former Islamist in a post occupied by secularists since the republic was founded. The ruling Justice and Development Party said late yesterday that it would seek to speed up elections to choose a new parliament as a way to break the deadlock. Voting could take place as soon as June 24, nearly five months ahead of schedule.
NEWS
By DAVID HOLLEY and DAVID HOLLEY,LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 10, 2005
BAKU, Azerbaijan -- Thousands rallied in Azerbaijan's capital yesterday to demand the government's resignation because of abuses in last weekend's parliamentary election. But both sides showed signs of compromise, with the rally ending peacefully and officials taking steps to address problems with the vote counting. Under the glare of hundreds of helmeted riot police, about 20,000 protesters, many waving orange flags as a symbol of peaceful revolt, gathered in Victory Square for a three-hour rally permitted by the government.
NEWS
By John Murphy and John Murphy,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | June 26, 2000
MUTOKO, Zimbabwe - In 1975, at age 17, Maxwell Hodzi left his family in this rural mountain village eager to fight alongside Robert Mugabe in a liberation war against white rule. Now, some 20 years after victory, as his country teeters on the brink of economic ruin, Hodzi appears ready to go to battle again for his president and former commander. Wearing a black beret, Hodzi led a group of teen-agers in Mugabe T-shirts down the potholed streets of his hometown over the weekend hoping to develop a new generation of ruling party members.
NEWS
By Sebastian Rotella and Sebastian Rotella,LOS ANGELES TIMES | January 15, 2007
PARIS -- Interior Minister Nicolas Sarkozy accepted the presidential nomination of the ruling center-right party yesterday, promising to break with the past and setting up a high-stakes campaign that is likely to open a new era in French politics. The overwhelming vote by the members of the Union for a Popular Movement culminated a drive by Sarkozy that overcame an intraparty rift with an old guard loyal to President Jacques Chirac, 73, who has been in office since 1995. Although Sarkozy's plain-spoken, hard-charging, crime-fighter image has made him one of France's most popular leaders, he faces a tough challenge from Segolene Royal, a Socialist Party newcomer making an energetic bid to become the nation's first female president.
NEWS
By Erika Niedowski and Erika Niedowski,Sun Staff | September 24, 2006
NIZHNY NOVGOROD, Russia - The ground-level storefront couldn't look more like the campaign headquarters for Yedinaya Rossiya, the pro-Kremlin ruling party in Russia that controls the federal legislature and far too many regional and city governments to count. A circular sign with the party name and logo - a bear under the white, blue and red Russian flag - hangs prominently above the entrance. Enormous color photographs adorn the facade: In one, disabled children smilingly display medals won at a swim competition abroad during a trip made possible by the party's generosity.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.