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By John McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | September 10, 2013
As I go over some of the basics iin grammar with my undergraduate charges, I have tried to explain to them that the rules (which they no doubt think of as The Rules) are not all of a piece. Here is a slight revision of a taxonomy I posted early in 2012 about the categories of things that people treat as rules.   Actual but unnoticed rules:   Unless you are learning English as a second language as an adult, there is a whole network of subterranean rules of grammar that most native speakers never think about.
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NEWS
By Justin George and The Baltimore Sun | October 13, 2014
A man who was shot in a Northwest Baltimore robbery in 1993 died last week, upgrading his case to a homicide, Baltimore police said Monday. The robbery took place on Aug. 2, 1993, when Baltimore police say Kevin Lamar Coley shot Donald Gillums in the torso during a robbery in the 3000 block of N. Hilton Street in Forest Park. Gillums survived and lived 21 years until he died Aug. 24 at the age of 57. The Office of the Chief Medical Examiner ruled Oct. 7 that his death came as a result of complications from his gunshot wound.
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NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | March 13, 2013
Let me say more compactly what I tried to say earlier today . The presacriptivist/descriptivist debate is increasingly sterile. Hard-shell prescriptivists trumpet indefensible bogus rules, and hard-shell descriptivists, the ones who proclaim, "Prescriptivism must die," overlook the real need to prescribe reliable advice on writing. It comes down to this: Effective writing requires making sound choices about grammar, usage, syntax, and diction, considering subject, occasion, and audience.
NEWS
By Doug Donovan and The Baltimore Sun | October 13, 2014
The July death of a 10-year-old disabled foster child has been ruled a homicide — six years after the Baltimore city boy's mother was accused of shaking him into a coma-like state, Baltimore police announced Monday. Damaud Martin died July 2 at an Anne Arundel County group home that state regulators were in the process of closing down for multiple problems. State health officials are investigating whether Damaud received adequate care while living at the home, which was run by a company called LifeLine, but have cautioned against drawing any premature conclusions.
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | June 12, 2014
In his excellent Ad Infinitum: A Biography of Latin , Nicholas Ostler remarks that "when a grammarian notes that something is wrong, it means that many people are already doing it. "  He later explains, in two succinct sentences, what rules of grammar and usage are meant to do, and how we mistake their purpose:    Perhaps the cultural overlay of grammar--the complacent, and hence resented, elitism of those who have learned...
NEWS
December 12, 2012
Only politicians would "correct" the problems with speed cameras by creating more bureaucracies and rules ("Penalty pitched for bad tickets," Dec. 11). Get rid of the bloody things. We didn't need them for our first 100 years on the road. We don't need them now. Thomas F. McDonough, Towson
NEWS
By Peter Hermann | peter.hermann@baltsun.com | February 14, 2010
A mong the stranger sights at the height of our snowstorm's second act might have been the couple - dressed in shorts and T-shirts - walking blissfully along Pratt Street. Love, or an abundance of spirits, apparently conquers all, including the elements. "They were hand in hand," recalled a smiling, almost disbelieving Reggie Coates, who watched the snow waltz that was captured on a surveillance camera and shown live on the big screen to delighted workers hunkered down in Baltimore's Emergency Operations Center.
NEWS
May 12, 2010
Ultimate Baltimore Hairstylist Official Rules 1. NO PURCHASE NECESSARY. "b's Ultimate Baltimore Hairstylist" ("the Contest") is sponsored by b free daily, 501 N. Calvert Street, P.O. Box 1377, Baltimore, Maryland 21278. The Contest will begin on May 12th, 2010 at 12:01 a.m. ET and end on June 04, 2010 at 12:00 p.m. ET. The geographical scope of this Contest is Maryland. Void where prohibited and outside Maryland. b free daily's computer is the official time-keeping device for this Contest.
NEWS
April 30, 2010
Baltimore County Councilman Sam Moxley will not seek political office this year, he said Friday. When the Democrat announced earlier this year that he would leave the council after four terms representing Catonsville and Arbutus, he said he was considering a run for clerk of the court. He says now he has ruled that out. "I have thoroughly enjoyed my years in public service, and I will continue to look for ways to serve my community," Moxley said. "I am not sure where the future will lead me, but I am looking forward to the journey."
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop, The Baltimore Sun | December 6, 2010
The payments and "VIP trips" given to a Maryland cardiologist by Abbott Laboratories for parties and consulting work — disclosed in a federal report released Monday — are just what new legislation and industry guidelines are supposed to curtail, lawmakers said. But some industry analysts say the revamped rules aren't strong enough. "There's absolutely no [meaningful] regulation," said Eric G. Campbell, an associate professor at Harvard Medical School who studies health policy.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn and The Baltimore Sun | October 8, 2014
Ahead of new rules requiring chain restaurants to post calorie counts for their menu items, some of the restaurants are voluntarily introducing lower calorie selections. The new items tend to be salads rather than the main attractions such as burgers and pizza, but they contain an average of 60 fewer calories or a reduction of 12 percent, researchers at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health found. The researchers looked at new menu items in 2012 and 2013, ahead of new rules to offer the public nutritional information required by the Affordable Care Act. And they said the results, published in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine, could be the beginning of a trend in calorie reduction at fast food restaurants that aids the obesity epidemic.
NEWS
By Ned Holstein | October 8, 2014
A little-noticed research revolution confirms that our family courts are damaging the health of our children on a daily basis. In 2014, three separate and independent groups of experts reviewed decades of child development research. They found that after parents separate or divorce, children do much better with shared parenting - joint custody - on multiple measures of wellbeing than with single parenting. Yet in more than eight out of 10 custody cases today, one parent (usually the mother)
HEALTH
By Scott Dance and The Baltimore Sun | October 4, 2014
Officials at two Washington, D.C.-area hospitals said Friday they had isolated patients over fears of Ebola after the nation's first case of the deadly virus was confirmed in Dallas this week. But officials at one of the hospitals, Shady Grove Adventist Hospital in Rockville, determined late Friday that their patient had malaria, not Ebola, hospital officials said in a statement late Friday. Howard University Hospital quarantined a patient who had recently traveled to Nigeria out of "an abundance of caution," officials said.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and The Baltimore Sun | October 1, 2014
Walter Evan Black Jr., a retired chief judge of the U.S. District Court for Maryland who ruled against the city of Baltimore in its efforts to acquire the Colts after the team moved to Indianapolis, died of complications from Parkinson's disease Monday at his Easton home. The former Roland Park-area resident was 88. During a lengthy career, he ruled against Baltimore in 1985 when it attempted to acquire the Colts football franchise by condemnation. In his ruling, he said the city did not have the power to take the franchise because the team had moved on the night of March 29, 1984, before the day the city had filed its suit.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood and The Baltimore Sun | September 27, 2014
Last weekend, Towson students jammed into a parking lot outside Johnny Unitas Stadium, drinking and partying in a pre-game tailgate bash that university officials said left a police officer injured and a girl needing stitches after she attempted a backflip off a pickup truck. None of that was evident Saturday before the Tigers' football game against the Maine Black Bears, after university administrators cracked down on hard-core partying and set new rules for student tailgating.
SPORTS
By Aaron Wilson and The Baltimore Sun | September 26, 2014
The Ravens made it official, ruling out rookie defensive tackle Timmy Jernigan and offensive tackle Eugene Monroe for Sunday's game against the Carolina Panthers. Jernigan has a meniscus injury and did not practice all week. Monroe had arthroscopic knee surgery and could be sidelined for at least a few games. Meanwhile, veteran defensive end Chris Canty is questionable after not practicing all week due to knee and calf injuries. He's regarded as a game-time decision and the Ravens could start DeAngelo Tyson in his place.
NEWS
September 18, 2013
High Schools Cellphones permitted: Before first bell After last bell During five-minute breaks between classes During lunch At BYOD Pilot High Schools During class in conjunction with instruction Middle Schools Cellphones permitted: Before first bell After last bell Elementary Schools Cellphones permitted: On silent or turned off, out of sight
NEWS
By Chris Hine, Tribune newspapers | August 16, 2010
SHEBOYGAN, Wis. — The first item on the rules sheet the PGA of America handed out last week warned players to watch out — they could be hitting out of one of the 900-plus bunkers at Whistling Straits and not even know it. "That might mean many areas outside the ropes that might contain many footprints, heel prints or even tire tracks from golf cars or other vehicles," said Mark Wilson, co-chairman of the rules committee, which even...
NEWS
By Erin Cox and The Baltimore Sun | September 25, 2014
The Maryland Board of Elections determined Republican Larry Hogan broke a campaign finance rule, but the panel agreed Thursday to waive the fine associated with the minor infraction. Elections officials cleared Hogan of wrongdoing in two of three charges leveled against him by the Maryland Democratic Party this summer. In the third charge, officials determined Hogan violated campaign-finance rules by not paying his advocacy group, Change Maryland, for a poll the group sold to his campaign.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and The Baltimore Sun | September 22, 2014
The state attorney general's office is appealing a federal judge's ruling ordering Maryland to use an absentee ballot-marking technology for the disabled that the Board of Elections had refused to certify as secure. The state will ask the 4th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in Richmond, Va., to throw out District Judge Richard D. Bennett's decision this month. Bennett found that the election board's refusal to implement the program violated the federal Americans with Disabilities Act. The attorney general's office filed a notice of intent to appeal Monday but did not spell out its objections to the ruling.
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