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February 14, 2012
Gunpowder Falls State Park ranger Robert Bailey will lead a Mill Hike on Feb. 25 from 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. Winter is the best time of year to see the ruins of mills that once operated along the Gunpowder Falls. The hike begins at the Paper Mill Road parking lot of the Torrey C. Brown Rail Trail. Participants will visit the site of Ashland Furnace, an anthracite-fired furnace active in the mid-19th century, as well as other buildings from that same time period. Bailey will have old photographs showing the area in its prime.
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NEWS
August 13, 2014
We were saddened to read about Baltimore County Police Officer Joseph Stanley Harden's arrest on robbery and drug possession charges ( "Off-duty officer tries to break into home in search of drugs, police say," Aug. 1). The veteran officer reportedly told investigators he became addicted to Oxycodone after a work-related injury. While there is a general awareness of prescription drug abuse in our society, most people do not understand the complicated problem of chronic pain syndrome that can lead to prescription drug dependence or addiction.
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EXPLORE
By Lisa Kawata | July 25, 2011
You might have seen her in the audience, drawing pad on her lap, pencil swiftly sketching the drama before her - King Lear going mad, witches chanting over a bubbling pot, dueling Capulets and Montagues, or a brooding Hamlet. For as long as the Chesapeake Shakespeare Company has performed these classic plays in the ruins of the Patapsco Female Institute, local artist Mary Jo Tydlacka has captured the tragic and sometimes funny stories with her pencil and parlayed them into wildly colorful expressions worthy of the pathos of The Bard of Avon himself.
NEWS
By Charles Campbell | June 19, 2014
The Middle East and Africa are a complex matrix of religious cultural, racial, ethnic, clan and tribal dynamics that have developed over 1,000 years of conflict. Scott Anderson wrote in his new book, "Lawrence in Arabia," that the first inept U.S. government agent in the region, William Yates, established a tradition of misinterpreting the situation that his successors have rigorously maintained for 100 years. The rise of the group Islamic State of Iraq and Syria (ISIS) and the return of Sunni control to large sections of Syria and Iraq are not unexpected.
NEWS
By Tracy Wilkinson and Tribune Newspapers | January 16, 2010
The woman wailed outside the ruins of Cathedrale de Notre-Dame de Port-au-Prince, the Roman Catholic cathedral that symbolized Haiti's religious fervor. "This is what God did!" she cried Friday morning. "See what God can do!" Tuesday's earthquake brought down the roof of the enormous pink-and-cream cathedral, filling the apse and nave with tons of rubble. The quake punched out its vivid stained-glass windows, twisted its wrought-iron fencing and sliced brick walls like cake. The western steeple, which had soared more than 100 feet in the sky, toppled onto parishioners praying at an outdoor shrine to St. Emmanuel.
NEWS
May 6, 1994
If you were to compile a list of structural ruins as tourist attractions, you'd most likely think of sites in foreign countries -- Pompeii in southern Italy, or numerous decrepit castles throughout Europe.The United States, a relatively young nation, doesn't rate as a destination for devotees of ruins. The same could be said of Ellicott City (its reputation for antiques aside). But a private group, with help from the state and Howard County, aims to turn a local ruin into an attraction by making a seven-acre public garden park out of the crumbled stone building that once housed a young women's finishing school.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Ben Neihart and By Ben Neihart,Special to the Sun | June 24, 2001
"Love Among the Ruins," by Robert Clark. W.W. Norton. 333 pages. $24.95. Lately, I'll be reading a book, come across a bogus line of dialogue, an improbable turn of plot unpersuasively written, an interior monologue that stinks of unprocessed journal entry, and I'll have to stop reading the book. I'll try to get back into the narrative, but no matter what psychological game I play with myself, I just can't do it. It's as if the book has broken in my hands. The spell is weak. The book doesn't work.
NEWS
By Andrei Codrescu | January 29, 1996
NEW ORLEANS -- The imaginary line between past, present and future has been under assault in America for a long time, but in New Orleans it has been breached beyond repair. A monument to this idea stands now at the heart of New Orleans, right by the Mississippi River, the Convention Center and the Aquarium, all prime tourist real estate.It's the two-thirds-finished Harrah's Casino. This architectural, civic, social and political nightmare is snarling traffic, making politicians foam at the mouth, and it gives the moralists among us a reason to shake our heads.
FEATURES
By KATHERINE DREW DEBOALT | November 14, 1993
More than 150 years ago, on a hill overlooking the mill town that would become Ellicott City, young women of privilege walked the formal parlors and terraced gardens of the Patapsco Female Institute.There, the girls, many of whom had left Southern plantations for the middle and high school, were sequestered from the temptations of the town below. And there, the story goes, only old men were permitted on the grounds. Young men -- even cousins and brothers -- whom the headmistress considered potential distractions to her students, were forbidden to visit the institute.
EXPLORE
By Lisa Kawatalkawata@patuxent.com | June 3, 2011
You might have seen her in the audience, drawing pad on her lap, pencil swiftly sketching the drama before her — King Lear going mad, witches chanting over a bubbling pot, dueling Capulets and Montagues, or a brooding Hamlet. For as long as the Chesapeake Shakespeare Company has performed these classic plays in the ruins of the Patapsco Female Institute, local artist Mary Jo Tydlacka has captured the tragic and sometimes funny stories with her pencil and parlayed them into wildly colorful expressions worthy of the pathos of The Bard of Avon himself.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | April 26, 2014
Everyman Theatre has been on a roll since the beginning of 2013, when the company inaugurated its inviting new downtown space. The first full season in that venue - there's one more play left, "Tribes," opening May 28 - has been marked by exceptionally effective stagings of diverse works (three were given extra weeks to meet demand). "That's why it took so long to come up with a second season," said Everyman's artistic director, Vincent Lancisi. "I really felt intimidated by the scope of this one. " What Lancisi devised for 2014-2015 is a promising mix of three Baltimore premieres and three vintage plays.
NEWS
April 5, 2014
Springtime is slowly creeping into Hampden, so you know what that means? You guessed it! The return of water pipe obstructions. And since this is a neighborhood-wide, much needed infrastructure upgrade, you can bet it's coming soon to a block near you. Be careful out there, those things are tire eaters. But then, we live in Hampden, one of the most walkable neighborhoods in Baltimore City. Here are some events worth hoofin' it to.  Hometown band Future Islands recently blew up big time after an incredible performance on "The Late Show With David Letterman" - further fueled by Letterman gushing about how much he loved them.
FEATURES
By Ellen Nibali, For The Baltimore Sun | February 11, 2014
Deer have stripped all the leaves off my evergreen and my Nellie Stevens holly. Will they grow back, or should I cut them down? Some evergreen species tolerate deer "pruning" well and put out new growth in spring, although lower branches won't bounce back as fast as upper branches would. Yew, arborvitae, hemlock and many junipers fall in this category. You'll need to prevent future winter stripping, however, because the evergreen can't recover when this happens repeatedly.
FEATURES
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | January 15, 2014
  Video of a disagreement between the owner of a shopping mall party space and a Brooklyn Park woman -- who claims that her daughter's sixth birthday was ruined when the young guests were booted out without receiving pizza, cupcakes and goody bags -- has gone viral. Mother Jaime Norfolk is suing store owner Nsenga Rivens in Anne Arundel County District Court. But Rivens claims that she is the victim.  The owner of the party space, Shugaland, said that she asked the group to leave her business Sunday after they were rude and profane to her. Rivens says she has agreed to relocate her business from Marley Station Mall after mall officials were bombarded by calls from Norfolk supporters.
NEWS
By Natalie Sherman, The Baltimore Sun | December 29, 2013
Some people looking at the Northeast Baltimore church destroyed in a four-alarm fire Friday might see empty windows, blackened bricks, a sawed-off steeple and ceiling open to the sky. The Rev. Cecil Conteen Gray sees a miracle. "It should have fallen. It should have toppled," Gray said Sunday of the Northwood-Appold United Methodist Church's wooden steeple, which towered over the Cold Spring Lane and Loch Raven Boulevard corner for more than 60 years. The steeple, which withstood the flames Friday, was eventually taken down Saturday, its metal cross saved for a new building.
SPORTS
By Edward Lee and The Baltimore Sun | December 11, 2013
After opening the season with five consecutive losses, the Mount St. Mary's men's basketball team has won three of its past five games, including Saturday's 70-58 victory over Loyola. The surprising part is that the positive results have occurred without two starters. Senior center Kristijan Krajina has missed the last three games and will sit out the remainder of the season because of a torn anterior cruciate ligament. Freshman shooting guard Byron Ashe has not played in the past two games after suffering a concussion during practice.
FEATURES
By Rene Rodriguez and Rene Rodriguez,McClatchy-Tribune | April 5, 2008
The Ruins is, with one major caveat, about as good an adaptation of Scott Smith's best-selling novel as Hollywood was ever going to make. Smith's book - about a group of college kids who stumble onto a hill in the Mexican jungle where a flesh-eating vine dwells - was the kind of relentless beach read that seemed tailor-made for the movies, at least until you realized you were dealing with a story about a talking plant that drinks blood. That would be fine if you were making Little Shop of Horrors.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | September 28, 2013
At the start of Bram Stoker's 1897 novel "Dracula," a London lawyer named Harker visits Transylvania to facilitate a real estate deal for a mysterious count who desires new digs in England. Not anything freshly built, or even modestly rehabbed, mind you. Something old and crumbling will do fine, along the lines of the count's longtime castle, with its "dark window openings" and "frowning walls" that form "a jagged line against the sky. " Harker has found just the thing, he tells the count, an "ancient structure, built of heavy stones," a property that "has not been repaired for a large number of years" and has many trees that "make it in places gloomy.
NEWS
July 5, 2013
Well, Comrade Gov. Martin O'Malley has literally deluged Maryland taxpayers with new taxes, fees, licenses and tolls ("Marylanders' wallets run on empty," July 2). The People's Republic of Maryland now taxes the rain that falls on your home. The "in the bag" liberal socialist media, refuses to condemn such action even while this nation is in the midst of a depression, not a recession, but a real depression! It is not only the jobs that will be lost, as more and more businesses and industries "vote with their feet" to leave this socialist Garden of Eden, no, it is more than that.
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