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By J.D. Considine Blues B.B. King | November 12, 1998
The Rugrats MovieMusic From the Motion Picture (Interscope 90181)There's a reason "Rugrats" is one of the most popular shows on cable. Not only is its writing and animation sharp enough to hold the attention of adult viewers, but its characters are drawn without the condescension that often colors kidvid.In short, it's an equal-opportunity entertainer, one that doesn't discriminate on the basis of age or sophistication. So it shouldn't come as any surprise that "The Rugrats Movie: Music from the Motion Picture" is equally eclectic in its approach.
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NEWS
July 18, 2004
TownMall taking part in free program of summer movies TownMall of Westminster is participating in the Regal Entertainment Group's Free Family Film Festival, a summer program of free G- and PG-rated movies for children and their parents. One G- and one PG-rated film will be shown at 10 a.m. every Tuesday and Wednesday. Doors at Regal Westminster will open at 9:30 a.m. for first-come, first-served seating. The movie schedule, with the G-movie first, is: Tuesday and Wednesday: The King & I and Spy Kids.
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By Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan and Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan,SUN STAFF | November 17, 2000
It's practically a requirement of any film with the word "Paris" in its title to have the Eiffel Tower figure prominently in at least one scene. So when the landmark appears in Nickelodeon's latest cartoon film, "Rugrats in Paris: The Movie," it's natural to expect a cliched, ooh-look-they're-in-France scene. Instead, the Rugrats movie gives a chuckle-worthy nod to two classics when a large, robot dinosaur climbs up the Tower a la "King Kong." And when the babies operating the monster look up and spot an annoying fellow Rugrat hurtling through the sky, they squeal, "It's a nerd!
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | June 13, 2003
The people responsible for Rugrats Go Wild have seen a ton of movies, and seem to believe that's worth bragging about. How else to explain the numerous cinematic references that work their way into this latest big-screen manifestation of the diaper-obsessed Nickelodeon franchise? In less than 90 minutes, Rugrats includes homages to Planet of the Apes, Lord of the Flies, Tea and Sympathy, From Here to Eternity, Titanic, The Poseidon Adventure, Polyester, Cast Away, Doctor Dolittle, The Jungle Book, even Gilligan's Island.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | November 20, 1998
Parents, be prepared to have your kids' patience tested -- and, of course, your own.At almost 90 minutes, "The -Rugrats Movie" is three times the length of those Nickelodeon cartoons your children never seem to tire of. Whether they're ready to sit in a dark room for that long is a decision only you'll be able to make.You're also the ones who'll be forced to sit there alongside them, and be warned: The film is no more or less than the TV show writ large. Although some clever touches are clearly directed at adults -- at one point, a careening baby carriage wreaks havoc on a bucolic meadow scene featuring Bambi and Thumper -- much of the film's humor is quite likely to go under your head.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Bonnie Scott and Bonnie Scott,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | November 30, 1998
As a new mom, I often snickered with other new moms as we referred to our kids as rug rats. Little did I know the term would become the name of a top-rated television show, and now a movie. If your Rugrats fans can't wait to see their friends on the big screen, check out the new software titles based on the movie."The Rugrats Movie Activity Challenge," about $30, includes six games based on the Rugrats movie and featuring Rugrats characters. Players can help baby Dil navigate a traffic jam and escape circus monkeys or save Angelica using one of Stu's inventions.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN FILM CRITIC | December 8, 2000
Baltimore's youngest children will have a rare opportunity to experience the Senator Theatre this week, just one of the holiday treats playing at the historic movie palace. Through Thursday, kids of all ages will be allowed inside York Road's showcase theater to see "Rugrats in Paris," the latest big-screen adventures of those little munchkins that rule over cable's Nickelodeon channel. Although you normally have to be at least 5 years old to watch a film at the Senator, the better to ensure a peaceful movie-going experience, theater owner Tom Kiefaber isn't about to deny young kids the chance to take their parents to a film for once.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | January 4, 1999
The last time Eric Anthony Bates stood on the stage of the Lyric Opera House, he was graduating from the Carver Center for Arts and Technology. When he steps on that stage again Wednesday, it will be as a cast member of "Rugrats: A Live Adventure," the new stage version of the popular Nickelodeon TV series about the adventures of a group of diaper-clad toddlers.Speaking from "Rugrats' " stop in St. Louis, the 20-year-old Baltimore native marveled at this fortuitous turn of events. "Rugrats" is not only his first national tour, it's his professional debut -- the result of his first professional audition.
NEWS
July 13, 1995
Who said Americans don't have any taste? Just a glance at a recent Nielsen ratings survey for cable television networks illustrates the kind of cultural taste prevalent in the U.S. of A. these days.Here are the top 15 cable shows from the week of June 26-July 2:No. 1. "Raiders of the Lost Ark," Turner Broadcasting Station, 2.86 million homes.No. 2. NBA Draft, Turner Network Television, 2.53 million homes.No. 3. "Trading Places," USA Network, 2.39 million homes.No. 4. "Jaws," TBS, 2.37 million homes.
NEWS
October 31, 2000
William T. Hurtz, 81, a founder of the trendsetting United Productions of America animation studio, whose career stretched from Walt Disney in the 1930s to "Rugrats" in the 1990s, with stops in between for "Mr. Magoo," "George of the Jungle" and Cap'n Crunch cereal, died Oct. 14 in Van Nuys, Calif.
FEATURES
By Glenn Lovell and Glenn Lovell,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | June 11, 2003
John Waters vs. the Rugrats? This unlikely tussle between Baltimore's king of camp and Nickelodeon's cartoon franchise could be coming to a courthouse near you in the coming months. Rugrats Go Wild, an animated feature that opens Friday, is being shown in "Odorama" with scratch-and-sniff cards. The word "Odorama," first advertised as part of Waters' 1981 comedy Polyester, is a registered trademark - and Waters is hopping mad that Nickelodeon and Paramount Pictures, partners on the Rugrats movie, didn't clear it with him first.
NEWS
December 13, 2000
"I would recommend 'Columbus Story' by Alice Dalgliesh because it's educational and it tells how Christopher Columbus found America. I felt it was a good story because they went on an adventure across the sea." -- Veronica McCullough William Paca Elementary " 'Pizza Cats' (Rugrats Ready-to-Read, No. 5) by Gail Herman is about the Rugrats getting pizza and playing with cats. I like this book because it is funny when the pizza flew everywhere." -- Annmarie Williamson Charlesmont Elementary " 'Stuart Little' by E. B. White is about a mouse named Stuart.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN FILM CRITIC | December 8, 2000
Baltimore's youngest children will have a rare opportunity to experience the Senator Theatre this week, just one of the holiday treats playing at the historic movie palace. Through Thursday, kids of all ages will be allowed inside York Road's showcase theater to see "Rugrats in Paris," the latest big-screen adventures of those little munchkins that rule over cable's Nickelodeon channel. Although you normally have to be at least 5 years old to watch a film at the Senator, the better to ensure a peaceful movie-going experience, theater owner Tom Kiefaber isn't about to deny young kids the chance to take their parents to a film for once.
FEATURES
By Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan and Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan,SUN STAFF | November 17, 2000
It's practically a requirement of any film with the word "Paris" in its title to have the Eiffel Tower figure prominently in at least one scene. So when the landmark appears in Nickelodeon's latest cartoon film, "Rugrats in Paris: The Movie," it's natural to expect a cliched, ooh-look-they're-in-France scene. Instead, the Rugrats movie gives a chuckle-worthy nod to two classics when a large, robot dinosaur climbs up the Tower a la "King Kong." And when the babies operating the monster look up and spot an annoying fellow Rugrat hurtling through the sky, they squeal, "It's a nerd!
NEWS
October 31, 2000
William T. Hurtz, 81, a founder of the trendsetting United Productions of America animation studio, whose career stretched from Walt Disney in the 1930s to "Rugrats" in the 1990s, with stops in between for "Mr. Magoo," "George of the Jungle" and Cap'n Crunch cereal, died Oct. 14 in Van Nuys, Calif.
FEATURES
By Suzanne Loudermilk | January 13, 1999
Those Rugrats! Now you can eat themThose rascally Rugrats are everywhere -- on television, in the movies and even on stage.Now, they're in soup. Campbell's has come out with specially marked cans of Rugrats Pasta with Chicken in Chicken Broth, which features pasta shaped like characters Tommy, Baby Dil, Reptar, Chuckie, Spike and Angelica.The cans also have under-the-label holograms showing scenes from "The Rugrats Movie," now playing at area theaters.Cooking beef properlyDon't put it on the bun until it's done.
FEATURES
By Suzanne Loudermilk | January 13, 1999
Those Rugrats! Now you can eat themThose rascally Rugrats are everywhere -- on television, in the movies and even on stage.Now, they're in soup. Campbell's has come out with specially marked cans of Rugrats Pasta with Chicken in Chicken Broth, which features pasta shaped like characters Tommy, Baby Dil, Reptar, Chuckie, Spike and Angelica.The cans also have under-the-label holograms showing scenes from "The Rugrats Movie," now playing at area theaters.Cooking beef properlyDon't put it on the bun until it's done.
FEATURES
By Janis Campbell | November 2, 1998
The Yak's been tracking the cool stuff that has been showing up at school. Here are a few accessories that definitely make the grade.Scooby-Doo, where are you? On backpacks, pens and lunch boxes - that's where! There's tons of Scooby stuff at malls and discount stores like Target. But some of our favorite Scooby gear at the Warner Bros. Studio Store. Carry your Scooby snacks to school in the Scooby-Doo Lunch Kit ($15). The soft, blue lunch bag wipes clean and comes with a thermos.Keychains are still cool, but take this tip: Less is more.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | January 4, 1999
The last time Eric Anthony Bates stood on the stage of the Lyric Opera House, he was graduating from the Carver Center for Arts and Technology. When he steps on that stage again Wednesday, it will be as a cast member of "Rugrats: A Live Adventure," the new stage version of the popular Nickelodeon TV series about the adventures of a group of diaper-clad toddlers.Speaking from "Rugrats' " stop in St. Louis, the 20-year-old Baltimore native marveled at this fortuitous turn of events. "Rugrats" is not only his first national tour, it's his professional debut -- the result of his first professional audition.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Bonnie Scott and Bonnie Scott,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | November 30, 1998
As a new mom, I often snickered with other new moms as we referred to our kids as rug rats. Little did I know the term would become the name of a top-rated television show, and now a movie. If your Rugrats fans can't wait to see their friends on the big screen, check out the new software titles based on the movie."The Rugrats Movie Activity Challenge," about $30, includes six games based on the Rugrats movie and featuring Rugrats characters. Players can help baby Dil navigate a traffic jam and escape circus monkeys or save Angelica using one of Stu's inventions.
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