Advertisement
HomeCollectionsRuffian
IN THE NEWS

Ruffian

FEATURED ARTICLES
TOPIC
By Neil Milbert | July 11, 1999
Hard-hearted Manhattan went to sleep with tears trickling down her pillow. And when she awakened her nightmare had become reality. Ruffian, thoroughbred racing's black beauty, was part of the past.-- Chicago Tribune, July 7, 1975.ON THE EVE of Belmont Park's great match race between the undefeated 3-year-old filly Ruffian and 1975 Kentucky Derby winner Foolish Pleasure, the story line seemed an exercise in simplicity.It was a battle of the sexes.But this story line never found its way into print.
ARTICLES BY DATE
SPORTS
By Ken Murray and Ken Murray,Sun Reporter | May 20, 2007
The images will return today like snapshots from a funeral: Barbaro breaking through the gate prematurely. Barbaro breaking down in the first furlong. Crestfallen jockey Edgar Prado in tears. Barbaro being hauled away from Pimlico Race Course in an ambulance as night closed in. One more time, the nation's racing fans - along with many who are not - will mourn the loss of a champion. One more time, they will remember the moment, the ordeal and the bitter end. "What I loved was seeing Michael Matz run over and give the jockey a hug," Aynsley Smith, a sport psychologist for the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn.
Advertisement
SPORTS
By Dale Austin | November 1, 1990
When a 1,000-pound racehorse breaks down on slender legs while running about 35 mph, the damage can be temporary or as tragic as it was with Go for Wand in the Breeders' Cup Distaff on Saturday.Some horses take missteps and go on to race again, although usually against cheaper competition.Others have to be destroyed.In the serious cases, no one is sure what snaps first, but the result usually is a breakdown in the horse's suspensory apparatus and sesamoid bones.When running at full speed, the extra steps that a horse takes when falling or pulling up cause further breakdown.
SPORTS
By BILL ORDINE and BILL ORDINE,SUN REPORTER | April 6, 2007
Yesterday's death of Darryl Stingley, the former New England Patriots wide receiver who was paralyzed as a result of a brutal hit by the Oakland Raiders' Jack Tatum in a 1978 NFL preseason game, is a reminder that sports isn't always fun and games. Athletics often involves physical risk, and sometimes those tragic instances when the risk is realized remain hauntingly vivid. Here are a few: Herb Score (1957), Cleveland Indians pitcher: A hard-throwing phenom in the mid-1950s, Score was smashed in the face by a line drive off the bat of the New York Yankees' Gil McDougald.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Theater Critic | March 18, 1992
Presenting a double bill of one-act plays by Harold Pinter and Joe Orton makes sense since these writers were fans of each other's work. And though New Century Theater's productions of Pinter's "The Lover" and Orton's "The Ruffian on the Stair" are uneven, the resonances between them are intriguing and unmistakable.In "The Lover," an upper middle-class British husband and wife openly discuss -- indeed encourage -- each other's infidelities. Much of the humor derives from the chilly civility with which they address the hot subject of extramarital lust -- a subject so potentially incendiary that the less civilized might be tempted to "discuss" it at gunpoint.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Theater Critic | March 18, 1992
Presenting a double bill of one-act plays by Harold Pinter and Joe Orton makes sense since these writers were fans of each other's work. And though New Century Theater's productions of Pinter's "The Lover" and Orton's "The Ruffian on the Stair" are uneven, the resonances between them are intriguing and unmistakable.In "The Lover," an upper middle-class British husband and wife openly discuss -- indeed encourage -- each other's infidelities. Much of the humor derives from the chilly civility with which they address the hot subject of extramarital lust -- a subject so potentially incendiary that the less civilized might be tempted to "discuss" it at gunpoint.
NEWS
By STEVE PROCTOR A SCANDAL IN BELGRAVIA. Robert Barnard. Scribner's. 245 pages. $17.95 | September 1, 1991
RUFFIAN: BURNINGFROM THE START.Jane Schwartz.Ballantine.272 pages. $18. She was every horseman's dream come to life: a coal-black filly who could race a hole in the wind. Author Walter Farley once said she was the closest thing he'd ever seen to his mythical black stallion.But that isn't why people remember Ruffian. Her name will always be synonymous with tragedy, for that moment when millions watched on television as her leg snapped in a match race with Kentucky Derby winner Foolish Pleasure.
SPORTS
By JOHN STEADMAN | March 1, 1998
Most of the racing lessons came from his father -- no better teacher -- and Stuart Janney III has moved to center stage as an owner of horses, respected for the knowledge, commitment and care he brings with him. Unobtrusive and reserved. No boasts or brags. He's a young gentleman of the old school who knows his subject but is much too smart to claim he has all the answers.Janney has a problem child of a colt, a 3-year-old he named Coronado's Quest, who has strong Triple Crown possibilities.
SPORTS
By Ken Murray and Ken Murray,Sun Reporter | May 19, 2007
The images will return today like snapshots from a funeral: Barbaro breaking through the gate prematurely. Barbaro breaking down in the first furlong. Crestfallen jockey Edgar Prado in tears. Barbaro being hauled away from Pimlico Race Course in an ambulance as night closed in. One more time, the nation's racing fans - along with many who are not - will mourn the loss of a champion. One more time, they will remember the moment, the ordeal and the bitter end. "What I loved was seeing Michael Matz run over and give the jockey a hug," Aynsley Smith, a sport psychologist for the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn.
SPORTS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | October 26, 2003
ARCADIA, Calif. - The sensational 2-year-old filly Halfbridled overcame her adverse post position to win the Breeders' Cup Juvenile Fillies yesterday at Santa Anita Park. She carried Julie Krone to the first victory for a female jockey in the Breeders' Cup. The 2 1/2 -length victory capped a phenomenal inaugural season for the large, powerful daughter of Unbridled. Halfbridled won all four of her races with the ease of a potential superstar. Even the extremely disadvantageous 14 post in the Juvenile Fillies couldn't thwart her. "Her first leap out of the gate was so powerful that she put me two lengths in front of about six horses," Krone said.
SPORTS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | October 26, 2003
ARCADIA, Calif. - The sensational 2-year-old filly Halfbridled overcame her adverse post position to win the Breeders' Cup Juvenile Fillies yesterday at Santa Anita Park. She carried Julie Krone to the first victory for a female jockey in the Breeders' Cup. The 2 1/2 -length victory capped a phenomenal inaugural season for the large, powerful daughter of Unbridled. Halfbridled won all four of her races with the ease of a potential superstar. Even the extremely disadvantageous 14 post in the Juvenile Fillies couldn't thwart her. "Her first leap out of the gate was so powerful that she put me two lengths in front of about six horses," Krone said.
TOPIC
By Neil Milbert | July 11, 1999
Hard-hearted Manhattan went to sleep with tears trickling down her pillow. And when she awakened her nightmare had become reality. Ruffian, thoroughbred racing's black beauty, was part of the past.-- Chicago Tribune, July 7, 1975.ON THE EVE of Belmont Park's great match race between the undefeated 3-year-old filly Ruffian and 1975 Kentucky Derby winner Foolish Pleasure, the story line seemed an exercise in simplicity.It was a battle of the sexes.But this story line never found its way into print.
SPORTS
By JOHN STEADMAN | March 1, 1998
Most of the racing lessons came from his father -- no better teacher -- and Stuart Janney III has moved to center stage as an owner of horses, respected for the knowledge, commitment and care he brings with him. Unobtrusive and reserved. No boasts or brags. He's a young gentleman of the old school who knows his subject but is much too smart to claim he has all the answers.Janney has a problem child of a colt, a 3-year-old he named Coronado's Quest, who has strong Triple Crown possibilities.
FEATURES
By J. Doug Gill and J. Doug Gill,Contributing Writer | July 20, 1992
In keeping with the political overtones of the past week, the 50,000 thunder-seekers entering RFK on Friday evening were as effectively split as the two-party system. The only conjecture the Metallica and Guns N' Roses camps could agree upon was that opening act Faith No More would live up to the latter part of their moniker and offer "no more" than their allotted time. Thankfully, they complied.There is something positively menacing in the way Metallica's James Hatfield approaches his audience.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Theater Critic | March 18, 1992
Presenting a double bill of one-act plays by Harold Pinter and Joe Orton makes sense since these writers were fans of each other's work. And though New Century Theater's productions of Pinter's "The Lover" and Orton's "The Ruffian on the Stair" are uneven, the resonances between them are intriguing and unmistakable.In "The Lover," an upper middle-class British husband and wife openly discuss -- indeed encourage -- each other's infidelities. Much of the humor derives from the chilly civility with which they address the hot subject of extramarital lust -- a subject so potentially incendiary that the less civilized might be tempted to "discuss" it at gunpoint.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Theater Critic | March 18, 1992
Presenting a double bill of one-act plays by Harold Pinter and Joe Orton makes sense since these writers were fans of each other's work. And though New Century Theater's productions of Pinter's "The Lover" and Orton's "The Ruffian on the Stair" are uneven, the resonances between them are intriguing and unmistakable.In "The Lover," an upper middle-class British husband and wife openly discuss -- indeed encourage -- each other's infidelities. Much of the humor derives from the chilly civility with which they address the hot subject of extramarital lust -- a subject so potentially incendiary that the less civilized might be tempted to "discuss" it at gunpoint.
SPORTS
By BILL ORDINE and BILL ORDINE,SUN REPORTER | April 6, 2007
Yesterday's death of Darryl Stingley, the former New England Patriots wide receiver who was paralyzed as a result of a brutal hit by the Oakland Raiders' Jack Tatum in a 1978 NFL preseason game, is a reminder that sports isn't always fun and games. Athletics often involves physical risk, and sometimes those tragic instances when the risk is realized remain hauntingly vivid. Here are a few: Herb Score (1957), Cleveland Indians pitcher: A hard-throwing phenom in the mid-1950s, Score was smashed in the face by a line drive off the bat of the New York Yankees' Gil McDougald.
NEWS
By STEVE PROCTOR A SCANDAL IN BELGRAVIA. Robert Barnard. Scribner's. 245 pages. $17.95 | September 1, 1991
RUFFIAN: BURNINGFROM THE START.Jane Schwartz.Ballantine.272 pages. $18. She was every horseman's dream come to life: a coal-black filly who could race a hole in the wind. Author Walter Farley once said she was the closest thing he'd ever seen to his mythical black stallion.But that isn't why people remember Ruffian. Her name will always be synonymous with tragedy, for that moment when millions watched on television as her leg snapped in a match race with Kentucky Derby winner Foolish Pleasure.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.