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NEWS
By Dan Berger | April 9, 1999
The bad news is that legislation to enable Hillary Clinton to become mayor of Baltimore would also let Marion Barry, Rudy Giuliani, Al Sharpton or David Duke move here and run.Maryland will make payments to Marriott for two years, after which it has to find a job.Macedonia's rulers remain more scared of Serbia than of NATO.Pst, buddy, wanna buy a football team for 800 mil?Pub Date: 4/09/99
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NEWS
By Frank Luntz | February 5, 2008
Politics is a battle of inches. An expression here, a sound bite there can often mean the difference between celebration and commiseration. A litany of reasons has been given for Rudolph W. Giuliani's political collapse in this presidential race: He bypassed all the early primary states, showed an almost obsessive focus on 9/11, had dodgy associates and embraced a social policy agenda out of step with mainstream Republicans. True enough, but they ignore a more significant Giuliani campaign failure: the inability or utter unwillingness to communicate a presidential vision of America and the country's future.
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FEATURES
By HARTFORD COURANT | January 13, 2003
HOLLYWOOD -- When actor James Woods got the role of former New York Mayor Rudolph Giuliani for a TV film, his mother warned him. "She said, `Jimmy, this guy is the biggest American hero -- regardless of what the liberal press says -- since Franklin Roosevelt. Don't let them screw this up.'" The actor didn't let it happen in the USA Network production of Rudy!: The Rudolph Giuliani Story, he told critics in Los Angeles last week. "I mean, there's virtually nothing about Rudy Giuliani that I don't unequivocally admire."
NEWS
By McClatchy-Tribune | November 8, 2007
WASHINGTON -- Televangelist Pat Robertson endorsed Rudolph W. Giuliani's campaign yesterday, a surprising embrace that underscored the divisions among Christian conservatives about the candidates for the Republican presidential nomination. Alone, Robertson's support of the former New York mayor was unusual for a Christian conservative who once blamed the 2001 terrorist attacks on American sins such as abortion and a social liberal who supports abortion rights and gay rights. But coming the same day that another prominent Christian conservative -- Sen. Sam Brownback of Kansas -- endorsed Sen. John McCain of Arizona, and two days after influential conservative Paul Weyrich endorsed former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney, it was a fresh sign that one of the most influential blocs of voters in the party remains splintered.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | March 29, 2003
The most important thing to know about Rudy: The Rudy Giuliani Story is that the producers of the made-for-TV cable movie chose to contextualize Giuliani's entire life within the graphic, real-life images of the collapse of the World Trade Center towers on 9/11. How you feel about that one decision will probably determine how you feel about the entire film starring James Woods as Giuliani and premiering tomorrow night at 8 on cable channel USA. A warning - and it is especially needed with the possibility of children watching at that hour - the videotape images are intense and the film cuts back and forth to them regularly.
NEWS
By McClatchy-Tribune | November 8, 2007
WASHINGTON -- Televangelist Pat Robertson endorsed Rudolph W. Giuliani's campaign yesterday, a surprising embrace that underscored the divisions among Christian conservatives about the candidates for the Republican presidential nomination. Alone, Robertson's support of the former New York mayor was unusual for a Christian conservative who once blamed the 2001 terrorist attacks on American sins such as abortion and a social liberal who supports abortion rights and gay rights. But coming the same day that another prominent Christian conservative -- Sen. Sam Brownback of Kansas -- endorsed Sen. John McCain of Arizona, and two days after influential conservative Paul Weyrich endorsed former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney, it was a fresh sign that one of the most influential blocs of voters in the party remains splintered.
NEWS
By Joe Mathews and Joe Mathews,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 9, 1997
NEW YORK -- She is standing amid the broken glass on a crumbling sidewalk, across the street from Bushwick High, the most violent school in Brooklyn. Down the street, a drug dealer loiters on a corner -- a clear quality-of-life crime -- but the police ignore it.Ruth W. Messinger, who is running for mayor of this city of 7.3 million people, wouldn't want to be any place else.With today's Democratic primary, the two-month roller coaster that is New York's mayoral race begins in earnest. So far, by Big Apple standards, this has been a quiet year.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Buzz Bissinger and By Buzz Bissinger,Special to the Sun | October 6, 2002
Leadership, by Rudolph W. Giuliani with Ken Kurson, Miramax, 288 pages, $25.95. Sometime in the winter of 2001, back in the days when Rudy Giuliani was the mortal mayor of an immortal city and not vice versa, I was approached to see if I might serve as the writer for a book he was planning to do on his tenure. Aware of how New York had transformed into something spectacular under the Giuliani regime, I was intrigued. It was a fascinating tale, just as Giuliani himself was a fascinating tale, if it was a tale that could be told.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | May 7, 2001
NEW YORK -- Mayors of New York like to say they have the second-best and second-toughest job in the country, next to the presidency. While that is a considerable stretch, it certainly is a high-visibility post that has produced such colorful political stars as Fiorello LaGuardia, John Lindsay, Ed Koch and Rudy Giuliani. Until, that is, the end of this year when "Rudy," as everyone calls him, will be out of office, thanks to term limits. Four Democrats, on the outside looking in for nearly eight years as Republican Giuliani has occupied City Hall, and two Republicans who want to succeed him are all poised to run in the September primary.
NEWS
By Ellen Goodman | February 23, 1999
BOSTON -- Am I the only one in my homeroom class who thinks that Hillary Clinton would have to be nuts to run for the Senate?My fellow media majors are all salivating at the prospect of what they have collectively dubbed "The Battle of Titans." They actually want to see the first lady wrestle New York Mayor Rudy Giuliani for the same seat.Doesn't anyone else remember what happened to the original titans? The giant children of Uranus and Gaea set out to rule heaven and ended up overthrown by Zeus and his family in a disaster of, well, "Titanic" proportions.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | March 29, 2003
The most important thing to know about Rudy: The Rudy Giuliani Story is that the producers of the made-for-TV cable movie chose to contextualize Giuliani's entire life within the graphic, real-life images of the collapse of the World Trade Center towers on 9/11. How you feel about that one decision will probably determine how you feel about the entire film starring James Woods as Giuliani and premiering tomorrow night at 8 on cable channel USA. A warning - and it is especially needed with the possibility of children watching at that hour - the videotape images are intense and the film cuts back and forth to them regularly.
FEATURES
By HARTFORD COURANT | January 13, 2003
HOLLYWOOD -- When actor James Woods got the role of former New York Mayor Rudolph Giuliani for a TV film, his mother warned him. "She said, `Jimmy, this guy is the biggest American hero -- regardless of what the liberal press says -- since Franklin Roosevelt. Don't let them screw this up.'" The actor didn't let it happen in the USA Network production of Rudy!: The Rudolph Giuliani Story, he told critics in Los Angeles last week. "I mean, there's virtually nothing about Rudy Giuliani that I don't unequivocally admire."
NEWS
By Stephanie Desmon and Stephanie Desmon,SUN STAFF | October 24, 2002
Rudolph W. Giuliani is starring in an ad running on 15 radio stations throughout the Washington area, urging voters to return Bethesda Republican Constance A. Morella to Congress. He is planning to lend his name to a fund-raiser and share a Maryland stage with two other prominent members of the GOP -- including the gubernatorial candidate -- just two days before the coming election. In the past week, Giuliani has been in Minnesota, headlining a fund-raising luncheon for Norm Coleman, the former St. Paul mayor and GOP candidate for U.S. Senate.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Buzz Bissinger and By Buzz Bissinger,Special to the Sun | October 6, 2002
Leadership, by Rudolph W. Giuliani with Ken Kurson, Miramax, 288 pages, $25.95. Sometime in the winter of 2001, back in the days when Rudy Giuliani was the mortal mayor of an immortal city and not vice versa, I was approached to see if I might serve as the writer for a book he was planning to do on his tenure. Aware of how New York had transformed into something spectacular under the Giuliani regime, I was intrigued. It was a fascinating tale, just as Giuliani himself was a fascinating tale, if it was a tale that could be told.
NEWS
By Fred Kaplan and Fred Kaplan,THE BOSTON GLOBE | December 29, 2001
NEW YORK - Earlier this month, Mayor Rudolph W. Giuliani walked into Trio Restaurant on Manhattan's East Side. The diners greeted him with a standing ovation. The house musician started to play "New York, New York," and everyone - spontaneously - sang along. A few days later, he made a surprise appearance on the mock newscast of Saturday Night Live to sing "Will You Still Love Me Tomorrow." The audience squealed as if a Beatle had ambled onstage. New York has been that kind of town, and Giuliani that kind of public figure, since Sept.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | November 9, 2001
WASHINGTON -- The conventional wisdom on elections is that endorsements aren't decisive, and that if a wealthy candidate spends millions of his own cash and wins, it was the money that talked. Both views went out the window, however, in the upset victory of Democrat-turned-Republican Michael Bloomberg over Democrat Mark Green to be New York's next mayor. The money answer is what you certainly would expect from leading New York Democrats who were on the losing end in the election and from a political consultant who was a key adviser and architect of the huge Bloomberg television advertising campaign.
NEWS
By Frank Luntz | February 5, 2008
Politics is a battle of inches. An expression here, a sound bite there can often mean the difference between celebration and commiseration. A litany of reasons has been given for Rudolph W. Giuliani's political collapse in this presidential race: He bypassed all the early primary states, showed an almost obsessive focus on 9/11, had dodgy associates and embraced a social policy agenda out of step with mainstream Republicans. True enough, but they ignore a more significant Giuliani campaign failure: the inability or utter unwillingness to communicate a presidential vision of America and the country's future.
FEATURES
By Kevin Cowherd | September 13, 2001
The morning after the worst attack in U.S. history, with images of a jetliner serenely plowing into a glittering office tower and the Pentagon on fire seared into our minds forever, maybe what was most startling was how utterly, blessedly normal everything felt. Two hundred miles to the north, blocks of South Manhattan looked like Dresden in '45, as rescuers continued the grim task of searching through the rubble for the lucky and the dead. Forty miles to the south of us, with mortuary teams and specially trained, corpse-sniffing dogs fanning out, the same grisly work went on behind the charred, crumbled walls of the Pentagon.
FEATURES
By Kevin Cowherd | September 13, 2001
The morning after the worst attack in U.S. history, with images of a jetliner serenely plowing into a glittering office tower and the Pentagon on fire seared into our minds forever, maybe what was most startling was how utterly, blessedly normal everything felt. Two hundred miles to the north, blocks of South Manhattan looked like Dresden in '45, as rescuers continued the grim task of searching through the rubble for the lucky and the dead. Forty miles to the south of us, with mortuary teams and specially trained, corpse-sniffing dogs fanning out, the same grisly work went on behind the charred, crumbled walls of the Pentagon.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | May 7, 2001
NEW YORK -- Mayors of New York like to say they have the second-best and second-toughest job in the country, next to the presidency. While that is a considerable stretch, it certainly is a high-visibility post that has produced such colorful political stars as Fiorello LaGuardia, John Lindsay, Ed Koch and Rudy Giuliani. Until, that is, the end of this year when "Rudy," as everyone calls him, will be out of office, thanks to term limits. Four Democrats, on the outside looking in for nearly eight years as Republican Giuliani has occupied City Hall, and two Republicans who want to succeed him are all poised to run in the September primary.
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