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Rudolf Nureyev

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NEWS
January 12, 1993
Rudolf Nureyev's greatest leap was into the arms of a French airport policeman, shouting "Protect me!" in 1961. He was the first of the Soviet performing arts defectors for artistic freedom, spurning the security offered a pampered Kirov Ballet star in Leningrad. Russian performers still come over, but now as economic refugees who cannot keep warm on the new artistic freedom.Nureyev lifted ballet in the West to new heights, particularly in partnership with the older Margot Fonteyn in London's Royal Ballet.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | January 22, 2014
For fellow sufferers of polar vortexes (vortices?) -- and this winter really is getting to be a terrible bore, don't you think? -- Midweek Madness provides a steamy version of "Baby It's Cold Outside" to help you keep warm.
NEWS
By Anita Finkel and Anita Finkel,Special to The Sun | February 19, 1995
When you come right down to it, a biography that reads like a long, juicy, semi-scandalous, semi-moralizing People magazine article is a perfect first take on the life of Rudolf Nureyev, one suited to the era in which the dance star died, of AIDS, in 1993 at the age of 54. But from the perspective of history - and Nureyev is one of the few dancers (and few stars of any medium) almost certain to be of interest to history - it will take a more scholarly and dispassionate viewpoint to give the more substantial treatment this enormously talented and influential man deserves.
NEWS
By Anita Finkel and Anita Finkel,Special to The Sun | February 19, 1995
When you come right down to it, a biography that reads like a long, juicy, semi-scandalous, semi-moralizing People magazine article is a perfect first take on the life of Rudolf Nureyev, one suited to the era in which the dance star died, of AIDS, in 1993 at the age of 54. But from the perspective of history - and Nureyev is one of the few dancers (and few stars of any medium) almost certain to be of interest to history - it will take a more scholarly and dispassionate viewpoint to give the more substantial treatment this enormously talented and influential man deserves.
FEATURES
By Joan Jacobson and Joan Jacobson,Staff Writer | January 7, 1993
Rudolf Nureyev's zealous mission to dance drove him on a frenzied 30-year tour of the world, changing how audiences saw ballet and how dancers performed it.The legendary Mr. Nureyev died yesterday in Paris at the age of 54, just two months after receiving his last standing ovation at the Paris Opera.His doctor, Michel Canesi would say only that Mr. Nureyev died of "cardiac complications" following a long, "devastating illness.Following Mr. Nureyev's wishes, I can't say any more."Previous press reports said the gaunt, Russian dancer suffered from the AIDS virus.
NEWS
October 22, 1994
Kaleria Fedicheva, 58, a former ballerina with the Kirov Ballet in Leningrad who later taught dance in the United States, died of cancer on Sept. 13 in New York. She was a peer of Rudolf Nureyev, Natalia Makarova and Mikhail Baryshnikov.Harrison Humphries, 78, a retired Associated Press reporter, died Saturday of Parkinson's disease in Washington. He was a great-nephew of Dr. Samuel Mudd, the doctor who set the broken leg of John Wilkes Booth after the assassination of President Abraham Lincoln.
FEATURES
By J. D. Considine and J. D. Considine,Pop Music Critic | June 10, 1993
It used to be that writing an unauthorized biography was fairl easy work, requiring little more than a box of press clippings and access to a few ex-toadies eager to dish the dirt on their former employer. Just add hype and stir: instant bio.Today's scandal-mongers need something more, though. They need an angle -- something juicy enough to get mentioned by the gossip columnists, and nasty enough to titillate even the most jaded fan.Finding that angle can be a real challenge when the subject of your sleaze-ography is someone as notorious as Rolling Stones frontman Mick Jagger.
NEWS
October 27, 1991
Alan A. Harper, 61, a television producer who was the arts editor of "CBS News Sunday Morning," the weekly 90-minute newsmagazine program, since its inception in 1979, died of lung cancer Oct. 19 at Mount Sinai Hospital in New York. His work ranged widely among the arts and included accompanying Russian-born ballet dancer Rudolf Nureyev on a trip to his homeland to perform.
FEATURES
By New York Times | February 22, 1991
DAME MARGOT Fonteyn, who became an international ballet idol as the prima ballerina of the Royal Ballet in Britain, died yesterday in Paitilla Hospital in Panama City. She was 71 and lived on a farm near La Quinta Pata, Panama.Jane Hermann, the director of American Ballet Theater, said that she had been informed of Dame Margot's death by telephone by Querube Brillenbourg, the ballerina's stepdaughter. Brillenbourg said that Dame Margot had been ill for 2 1/2 years but gave no further details.
NEWS
October 22, 1994
Kaleria Fedicheva, 58, a former ballerina with the Kirov Ballet in Leningrad who later taught dance in the United States, died of cancer on Sept. 13 in New York. She was a peer of Rudolf Nureyev, Natalia Makarova and Mikhail Baryshnikov.Harrison Humphries, 78, a retired Associated Press reporter, died Saturday of Parkinson's disease in Washington. He was a great-nephew of Dr. Samuel Mudd, the doctor who set the broken leg of John Wilkes Booth after the assassination of President Abraham Lincoln.
FEATURES
By J. D. Considine and J. D. Considine,Pop Music Critic | June 10, 1993
It used to be that writing an unauthorized biography was fairl easy work, requiring little more than a box of press clippings and access to a few ex-toadies eager to dish the dirt on their former employer. Just add hype and stir: instant bio.Today's scandal-mongers need something more, though. They need an angle -- something juicy enough to get mentioned by the gossip columnists, and nasty enough to titillate even the most jaded fan.Finding that angle can be a real challenge when the subject of your sleaze-ography is someone as notorious as Rolling Stones frontman Mick Jagger.
NEWS
January 12, 1993
Rudolf Nureyev's greatest leap was into the arms of a French airport policeman, shouting "Protect me!" in 1961. He was the first of the Soviet performing arts defectors for artistic freedom, spurning the security offered a pampered Kirov Ballet star in Leningrad. Russian performers still come over, but now as economic refugees who cannot keep warm on the new artistic freedom.Nureyev lifted ballet in the West to new heights, particularly in partnership with the older Margot Fonteyn in London's Royal Ballet.
FEATURES
By Joan Jacobson and Joan Jacobson,Staff Writer | January 7, 1993
Rudolf Nureyev's zealous mission to dance drove him on a frenzied 30-year tour of the world, changing how audiences saw ballet and how dancers performed it.The legendary Mr. Nureyev died yesterday in Paris at the age of 54, just two months after receiving his last standing ovation at the Paris Opera.His doctor, Michel Canesi would say only that Mr. Nureyev died of "cardiac complications" following a long, "devastating illness.Following Mr. Nureyev's wishes, I can't say any more."Previous press reports said the gaunt, Russian dancer suffered from the AIDS virus.
NEWS
By SEATTLE POST-INTELLIGENCER | April 14, 1996
"I never thought I would dance for so long," said Mikhail Baryshnikov.Mr. Baryshnikov, 48, remains one of the most extraordinary dancers of this century. He continues to receive high praise for his dancing, as he has done since he was an 18-year-old living in Russia."Encouragement from Merce [Cunningham] and Martha Graham, even Mark [Morris] and Twyla [Tharp] and Paul Taylor gave me a new life," he said recently.Unlike Rudolf Nureyev, another great 20th-century Russian dancer who danced classical roles deep into middle age with depressing results, Mr. Baryshnikov knew when the days of white tights and leading romantic roles in ballet were over.
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