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NEWS
December 28, 2003
On December 26, 2003, ALBERT RUDMAN, beloved husband of Charlotte Rudman (nee Darsch), and the late Hannah Rudman (nee Brecher), loving father of Barbara Goldfarb of Livingston, NJ and Caryn Tapper of Reisterstown, MD, dear father-in-law of Ahmi Goldfarb, dear stepfather of Neil and Angela Levy and Phyllis and William Quarles, adored brother of the late Adeline Adler, Gilbert Rudman, Mitzi Geartner, Irving, Sidney and Leonard Rudman, loving grandfather of...
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NEWS
By Greg Miller and Greg Miller,Tribune Washington Bureau | March 17, 2009
WASHINGTON - CIA Director Leon E. Panetta has chosen Republican former Sen. Warren B. Rudman as a special adviser, turning to a respected politician to help guide the agency through a congressional investigation of the CIA's interrogation program. The decision represents an unusual step for the CIA, which has faced similar probes in recent years without enlisting such high-profile help. But the move reflects a recognition of the stakes of a Senate inquiry into one of the agency's most controversial programs in recent years, as well as the political instincts of its new director.
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NEWS
March 9, 1993
Dr. Gilbert L. Rudman, a general practitioner who retired in 1981, died Sunday of complications of Parkinson's disease at his Pikesville home. He was 80.Dr. Rudman started his practice in Baltimore in 1939.He was a member of the staff of Bon Secours Hospital, the Baltimore City Medical Society and the Medical and Chirurgical Faculty of Maryland.The Baltimore native was a graduate of City College, Johns Hopkins University and the University of Maryland Medical School.Services were to be conducted at noon today at the Sol Levinson & Bros.
NEWS
December 28, 2003
On December 26, 2003, ALBERT RUDMAN, beloved husband of Charlotte Rudman (nee Darsch), and the late Hannah Rudman (nee Brecher), loving father of Barbara Goldfarb of Livingston, NJ and Caryn Tapper of Reisterstown, MD, dear father-in-law of Ahmi Goldfarb, dear stepfather of Neil and Angela Levy and Phyllis and William Quarles, adored brother of the late Adeline Adler, Gilbert Rudman, Mitzi Geartner, Irving, Sidney and Leonard Rudman, loving grandfather of...
NEWS
By Peter Osterlund and Peter Osterlund,Washington Bureau of The Sun | September 22, 1990
WASHINGTON -- While President Bush predicted that long-running budget talks were going "down to the wire," Democratic officials said yesterday that they would seek to move the wire back 20 days.With talks stalled over President Bush's push for a cut in the capital gains tax rate, Democratic officials said yesterday that they would attempt to postpone the Gramm-Rudman deadline until Oct. 20.If congressional leaders and White House officials fail to agree on a plan to cut the deficit by the Oct. 1 start of the new fiscal year, the Gramm-Rudman law is supposed to do it for them, automatically whacking billions of dollars out of the federal budget.
NEWS
By Adam Pertman and Adam Pertman,Boston Globe | March 24, 1992
Republican Sen. Warren Rudman of New Hampshire apparently will announce today that he will not seek re-election to a third term. The move would radically alter the political landscape of the state and could appreciably diminish its clout in Washington.Sources in the state,asked last night whether Mr. Rudman planned to bow out,would not deny it. One said the senator was so torn by the decision that he wavered several times during the day yesterday."It's like a tennis ball going back and forth over the net," said the source.
BUSINESS
By John E. Woodruff and John E. Woodruff,Staff Writer | January 12, 1994
Former U.S. Sen. Warren B. Rudman warned yesterday of "deep long-range concerns" about what the federal budget deficit will do to the U.S. economy, even as Maryland business leaders took in a series of upbeat forecasts for the nation and Maryland for 1994."
NEWS
By Greg Miller and Greg Miller,Tribune Washington Bureau | March 17, 2009
WASHINGTON - CIA Director Leon E. Panetta has chosen Republican former Sen. Warren B. Rudman as a special adviser, turning to a respected politician to help guide the agency through a congressional investigation of the CIA's interrogation program. The decision represents an unusual step for the CIA, which has faced similar probes in recent years without enlisting such high-profile help. But the move reflects a recognition of the stakes of a Senate inquiry into one of the agency's most controversial programs in recent years, as well as the political instincts of its new director.
BUSINESS
April 24, 1996
Mercantile economist moves to Pell RudmanMercantile Bankshares Corp. chief economist David L. Donabedian has left the company to become senior portfolio manager with Rothschild/Pell Rudman Inc., a Baltimore-based investment manager.Mr. Donabedian, who started on Monday, will manage money for wealthy individuals and families, he said."I took the job because of the growth opportunities it presents," he said. "The opportunity to work in a smaller but faster-growing environment was very attractive.
BUSINESS
November 15, 1994
Rothschild joins with Pell RudmanThe Rothschild Co., a Baltimore investment management firm, announced yesterday that it has become affiliated with Boston-based Pell, Rudman & Co. Inc. Both are subsidiaries of United Asset Management, a Boston firm whose 40 affiliates manage about $102 billion in assets.Rothschild President Stanford Z. Rothschild Jr., 69, is chairman of the newly renamed Rothschild/Pell, Rudman & Co. Inc., while Edward I. Rudman, 57, becomes president of the new firm. Mr. Rothschild said the company, which has $2.2 billion in assets under management, plans to open a Baltimore branch of Pell Rudman's Atlantic Trust Co. N.A., which is based in Washington.
NEWS
December 26, 2002
IN THE WAKE of the Sept. 11 attacks, it seemed like a relatively straightforward proposition to create an independent, blue-ribbon commission to investigate what went wrong and how to fix it. But the effort has proved to be amazingly difficult, and the commission has yet to meet. Time and again the Bush administration and many of the other politicians involved have proven more concerned about their own interests than in giving Americans an unvarnished look at how their government failed in its No. 1 responsibility: to protect them.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | December 4, 2002
WASHINGTON -- In selecting former Secretary of State Henry A. Kissinger to chair the congressionally mandated investigation of the events of Sept. 11, President Bush has followed precedent by turning to a major political figure with no conspicuous investigative skills. Similarly, President Lyndon B. Johnson drafted Supreme Court Chief Justice Earl Warren to seek the truth about the assassination of President John F. Kennedy, and President Ronald Reagan tapped Texas Sen. John Tower to inquire into the Iran-contra affair.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | November 22, 2002
WASHINGTON -- Creation of the Department of Homeland Security is a vindication for former Sens. Gary Hart, Democrat of Colorado, and Warren Rudman, Republican of New Hampshire, who nine months before the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks warned of the threat and called for just such a new federal agency. Mr. Hart, while expressing some satisfaction that it has now been approved, says "a year and a half has been wasted" by President Bush's failure to act sooner on their recommendation and those of Democratic Sen. Joseph Lieberman and Republican Rep. William "Mac" Thornberry.
NEWS
By Rona Kobell and Rona Kobell,SUN STAFF | December 26, 2001
On Christmas morning, Albert Rudman woke up, wrapped himself in a red Izod cardigan that barely stretched over his oxygen tank, and drove to the Veterans Affairs Medical Center in Baltimore to begin rounds. The 81-year-old Jewish grandfather was just getting started when he handed Hayes Moore a tote bag stuffed with a sweat shirt, hygiene kit, baseball cap and crossword puzzle book. Moore smiled. "I love crossword puzzle books. That's how I learned most of my vocabulary." Then he added: "I can use everything in here.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sloane Brown | February 20, 2000
It was a magical evening for Maryland Volunteer Lawyers Service. First, there was a benefit performance by magicians Penn and Teller at the Lyric Opera House. Then, about 150 folks levitated (OK, so maybe they just walked) to the mezzanine for a dessert reception. Conjured up in the crowd: Kai Jackson, event chair; Steve Mandell, corporate sales chair; Winnie Borden, MVLS executive director; Bonnie Butler, MVLS board president; Jerald Luxie, Joan Salim, Lou Hargrave, Walter Burford, MVLS board members; Steve Manekin, partner at Ellin & Tucker; Nancy Alquist, partner at Ballard Spahr Andrews & Ingersoll; Richard Williams Jr., National Institutes of Health administrator; Ken Hornstein, Allfirst Bank vice president; and Anne Russell, vice president at Pell Rudman Trust Co. The evening's finest feat?
BUSINESS
By JULIUS WESTHEIMER | May 10, 1996
AFTER A dizzying 133-point swing Wednesday, a 153-point (( plunge in its four previous sessions and a virtual standoff yesterday, these observations:The Dow today is ahead 358 points this year, up 1,640 points since Jan. 1, 1995, and ahead about 2,610 points in the last five years (Mid-May 1991: DJ 2,865.38.)LAST-MINUTE LIST: Speaking of Wall Street, here are practical Mother's Day gifts:"Beardstown Ladies Common Sense Investment Guide" by the Beardstown Ladies, "Beardstown Ladies Stitch-in-Time Guide to Growing Your Nest Egg," by same authors (each $19.95)
NEWS
March 27, 1992
"Is it worth it?"Can you do anything?"Can you make the country better?"Sen. Warren B. Rudman asked himself these questions March 12 in a despairing speech about the "economic disaster" caused by runaway federal deficits. Twelve days later he provided his answer. It was no and no and no. This tough New Hampshire Republican announced he would retire, hale and hearty at 61, and it is difficult to think of a more somber commentary on politics in America.Mr. Rudman pondered in that March 12 soliloquy why it was that with the deficit running at a record $400 billion, the Bush administration and the Democratic leadership in Congress could contemplate budget proposals adding even a penny to a national debt rapidly nearing $4 trillion.
NEWS
By THEO LIPPMAN JR | January 13, 1994
SECRETARY OF LABOR Robert Reich came by to break bread with the editorial board this week. He almost made it through lunch without one of those gentle, smart aleck cheap shots that some editorial writers do so well.The last question of the session was, "Care to predict the next employment figures?"Last week, well-informed readers all recall, the secretary was asked that question on the eve of the release of the December employment figures. He replied with an answer that was below what many economists and traders were predicting -- and his answer proved pretty much on target.
BUSINESS
April 24, 1996
Mercantile economist moves to Pell RudmanMercantile Bankshares Corp. chief economist David L. Donabedian has left the company to become senior portfolio manager with Rothschild/Pell Rudman Inc., a Baltimore-based investment manager.Mr. Donabedian, who started on Monday, will manage money for wealthy individuals and families, he said."I took the job because of the growth opportunities it presents," he said. "The opportunity to work in a smaller but faster-growing environment was very attractive.
BUSINESS
By New York Times News Service | September 16, 1995
A long-awaited report on the Nasdaq stock market, the nation's fastest-growing equity market, will call for changes in the market's governance and supervisory mechanisms, but will not call for a major supervisory overhaul, according to people familiar with the new study.They said the report by former Sen. Warren B. Rudman will recommend increased public representation on the boards of that stock market and its parent, the National Association of Securities Dealers, as well as a significant boost in the market's enforcement capabilities.
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